Ivy Engel

Part-Time Reporter

Email: iengel@uwyo.edu

Ivy is a current undergraduate student at the University of Wyoming. She is studying biology with minors in chemistry, journalism, and business. Hoping to go into science communication upon graduation in 2020, she’s excited to get a taste of the world of broadcast journalism and to share her love of science. In her free time, Ivy enjoys baking, reading, and spending time outdoors.

In the fall of 2019, Ivy was promoted to a part-time paid position.

Mike Goad via Pixabay License

Old Faithful is known for being, well, faithful. But it wasn't always that way. In fact, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters, it once stopped erupting for nearly 100 years.

Brandon Hays

When University of Wyoming Department of Botany Associate Professor Daniel Laughlin realized he would have to teach ecology online for the fall semester, he started searching for a resource to show his students landscapes from afar.

When he didn't find what he was looking for, Laughlin and his graduate students designed the Global Vegetation Project.

David Jones

At the start of the semester, the University of Wyoming decided to proceed with a hybrid of online and in-person classes. The plan was that everybody who works on campus was tested before the semester started and no students were allowed on campus until they passed an initial test. The other part of the plan is randomized testing of students and staff now that they're on campus. If there's an outbreak, classes could be pushed to online immediately.

Feeding

When the pandemic hit the Laramie community, food banks saw an increase in visitors. To continue to support those facing economic hardships this fall, Feeding Laramie Valley implemented the Kids Home For Dinner program to provide kids with two homemade meals for the weekend. 

J. Derek Scasta

Cattle ranching is a costly endeavor, and one little fly can have a huge impact on that cost. Horn flies only bite cattle and some animals are more susceptible to them than others. Knowing why could reduce the costs associated with these pests.

Photos courtesy of USFS National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation

It's a bit like CSI - if the cops suspect someone has been there, they check for DNA, take it back to the lab, and figure out who it belongs to. Only these researchers aren't looking for crooks - they're looking for endangered or invasive species, using environmental DNA (eDNA).

Pilot Hill Project

A small portion of the Pilot Hill parcel is now open to the public. The parcel, located on the eastern edge of Laramie, is part of a collaborative effort to protect nearly 4,344 acres for nonmotorized recreation and wildlife habitat.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

As part of a statewide disease monitoring plan, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is asking hunters in certain areas to submit their animals for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing.

Courtesy of NYU's Applied Mathematics Lab

How the unique topography of places like Sinks Canyon State Park in Wyoming formed has puzzled researchers for a long time. But researchers at New York University published research last week that gave some insight into the process.

pxhere via CC0 Public Domain

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many have turned to the great outdoors in an effort to get out of their house but still stay away from people. And with more people out of work, it also helps to be able to fill the freezer. For some, stocking up on food during the pandemic means buying extra meat. For others, it means buying a hunting license and heading into the field. For Tylynn Smith from Laramie, it's her first time going hunting.

Hila Shamon with Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Swift foxes are reddish-brown, a bit smaller than a house cat, with big ears and a long tail. They do their best to sound intimidating when they're live-trapped, but they tend to be quite docile. They were historically found across the Great Plains region from Alberta, Canada down through the central part of the United States, but today, they're only in about 40 percent of that area.

PxHere through Creative Commons CC0

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is urging anglers to modify their routine to protect fish. Hot, dry weather can heat up water temperatures and lower the overall dissolved oxygen in the water, which can stress the fish. 

University of Wyoming

World-renowned archeologist George Frison died this Sunday, Sept. 6 at the age of 95. Frison founded the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department and was the first state archeologist.

Pilot Hill Project

The Wyoming Board of Land Commissioners closed a land exchange on Friday that secures 4,343 acres of land for the Pilot Hill Project. The exchange has been in the works for more than two years and traded 11,668 acres of isolated state trust land for the area now in Pilot Hill.

Yathin S Krishnappa via the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Hunter education is required for all hunters in Wyoming who were born after January 1, 1966. But the Wyoming Game and Fish Department's (WGFD) Hunter Mentor Program enables new hunters who haven't completed their hunter education to experience the hunt with a mentor who has taken the course.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is encouraging kids and their families to get outside and learn more about the state's wildlife with their "Inspire a Kid" program. The program kicked off in June with the release of the "Wyo-100" checklist which features 100 outdoor activities to do across the state.

Nursing student Jessica Wiechman checks patient Agnes Taylor's leg wound.
Ivy Engel

Before nurses begin working in real-world scenarios, they have to go through lots of training and preparation. At the University of Wyoming (UW) Faye W. Whitney School of Nursing, students have to complete a minimum of 1,125 hours of clinical practice, which includes around 100 hours of simulations.

Bureau of Land Management via Attribution 2.0 Generic

There are over 700,000 acres in Wyoming designated as Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) and U.S. Sen. John Barrasso is circulating a new bill that recommends action for 176,454 acres - about 23 percent - of that land. 

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Residents in Wyoming and across the country are reporting packages of mysterious seeds showing up at their doorstep, but the recipients never ordered them. 

barrasso.senate.gov

The U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works held a hearing on reducing the spread of zoonotic diseases on July 22. A zoonotic disease is one that spreads from animals into humans.

A male Sage Grouse (also known as the Greater Sage Grouse) in the USA
Pacific Southwest Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from Sacramento, US

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is asking landowners and outdoor recreationists to report dead sage grouse they find as part of an ongoing effort to track West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks in the species.

Ivy Engel

The Pilot Hill Project started in 2017 when rancher Doug Samuelson approached Albany County with a proposition. They could have first dibs on his almost 5,500 acres of land just East of Laramie - it was already land where people liked to recreate in the past - but they had to raise the ten million dollars to purchase it within a year. Since then, it's blossomed into a community-wide project.

Wyoming toad
Sara Armstrong / USFWS Mountain-Prairie

Imperiled species - species that are threatened or endangered - are seeing population declines that are much faster than they were 100 years ago, according to a recent study by researchers at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Stanford University, and the Missouri Botanical Garden. While Wyoming is home to a relatively low number of imperiled vertebrate species, scientists warn that's no reason to be lax.

Photos courtesy of DEQ

As the summer season ramps up, so does the possibility of Harmful Cyanobacteria Blooms (HCBs). Also known as blue-green algae, cyanobacteria are found in many bodies of water worldwide. They're normally harmless, but when their growth explodes and forms a bloom, they can release toxic chemicals into the water around them. They can cause symptoms in people ranging from skin irritation to liver damage, and they can be deadly to animals.

BLM Wyoming Photo by Mark Thonhoff via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Tracking wildlife in Wyoming is no easy task, but the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is working to create comprehensive datasets on the state's animal populations.

courtesy of WYDOT

The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) may soon adopt technology that could give them an earlier warning when a "creeper" landslide is occurring and allows them to respond. 

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