Ivy Engel

Part-Time Reporter

Email: iengel@uwyo.edu

Ivy started as a science news intern in the summer of 2019 and has been hooked on broadcast since. In the spring of 2020, she virtually graduated from the University of Wyoming with a B.S. in biology with minors of journalism and business. She continues to spread her love of science, wildlife, and the outdoors with her stories. When she’s not writing for WPR, she enjoys baking, reading, playing with her dog, and caring for her many plants.

 

In the fall of 2019, Ivy was promoted to a part-time paid position.

Sean MacDonald

Hawaii's Oahu island is one of the most disturbed ecosystems in the world. Non-native plants that stowed away on ships or were brought to the island by early settlers for lawns and gardens have now nearly wiped out native plants.

Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites and Trails

In an attempt to offset state budget cuts, Wyoming State Parks and Historic Sites has instituted a fee increase in all areas.

Kevin Vandivier

For the first time, all campgrounds in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway will be available for reservation starting January 26.

Shane Murphy

Wildfire research has become increasingly important in recent years as climate change has caused fires to become more common and more intense. But wildfire smoke could be having a bigger effect on the climate than previously thought. Wyoming Public Radio's Ivy Engel spoke to Shane Murphy, a University of Wyoming researcher who studied the smoke from inside the plumes.

Will Laegried

The University of Wyoming (UW) has prioritized testing for its community during the COVID-19 pandemic. Its testing program started at the beginning of the school year and has been an important tool as UW monitored the presence of the virus.

Shane Murphy

As wildfires become more common and intense, it's becoming critical to understand how they affect the climate. And according to newly accepted data from University of Wyoming (UW) researchers, climate models that have been used for years likely had some key things wrong with them.

Juntos

Experts say that immigrants can help bolster a community's declining population, but many small towns, which are common in the West, struggle to attract them. Gateways For Growth (G4G) is a national program that tries to help these towns become welcoming to immigrant populations.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is putting together a new taskforce to tackle wildlife issues that are important to the public.

Shaul Hurwitz

Old Faithful geyser is one of the most popular areas in Yellowstone National Park. But a major climate event nearly 800 years ago made the geyser a little less faithful. Wyoming Public Radio's Ivy Engel had a conversation with U.S. Geological Survey research geologist Shaul Hurwitz, who studied this strange period.

Doug Smith

Trumpeter Swans were first documented in Yellowstone National Park in the early 1900s, and they were common until the 1960s when their population started to decline. By 2010, there were only about 60 swans in the park. The loss of these birds has brought together more than seven different federal, state, and private agencies in the quest to bring them back to their former numbers.

US Forest Service

The Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team assembled by the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland has completed its assessment for the Mullen Fire area. 

Joe Ravi, via Wikimedia Commons, license CC-BY-SA 3.0

The United States Forest Service (USFS) is set to release an amendment to the Thunder Basin National Grassland management plan. There are five proposed alternatives to amend black-tailed prairie dog management on the grassland-a highly controversial subject for local landowners and wildlife advocates.

The accepted amendment will change a previous amendment from 2015.

Mike Goad via Pixabay License

Old Faithful is known for being, well, faithful. But it wasn't always that way. In fact, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters, it once stopped erupting for nearly 100 years.

Brandon Hays

When University of Wyoming Department of Botany Associate Professor Daniel Laughlin realized he would have to teach ecology online for the fall semester, he started searching for a resource to show his students landscapes from afar.

When he didn't find what he was looking for, Laughlin and his graduate students designed the Global Vegetation Project.

David Jones

At the start of the semester, the University of Wyoming decided to proceed with a hybrid of online and in-person classes. The plan was that everybody who works on campus was tested before the semester started and no students were allowed on campus until they passed an initial test. The other part of the plan is randomized testing of students and staff now that they're on campus. If there's an outbreak, classes could be pushed to online immediately.

Feeding

When the pandemic hit the Laramie community, food banks saw an increase in visitors. To continue to support those facing economic hardships this fall, Feeding Laramie Valley implemented the Kids Home For Dinner program to provide kids with two homemade meals for the weekend. 

J. Derek Scasta

Cattle ranching is a costly endeavor, and one little fly can have a huge impact on that cost. Horn flies only bite cattle and some animals are more susceptible to them than others. Knowing why could reduce the costs associated with these pests.

Photos courtesy of USFS National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation

It's a bit like CSI - if the cops suspect someone has been there, they check for DNA, take it back to the lab, and figure out who it belongs to. Only these researchers aren't looking for crooks - they're looking for endangered or invasive species, using environmental DNA (eDNA).

Pilot Hill Project

A small portion of the Pilot Hill parcel is now open to the public. The parcel, located on the eastern edge of Laramie, is part of a collaborative effort to protect nearly 4,344 acres for nonmotorized recreation and wildlife habitat.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

As part of a statewide disease monitoring plan, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is asking hunters in certain areas to submit their animals for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing.

Courtesy of NYU's Applied Mathematics Lab

How the unique topography of places like Sinks Canyon State Park in Wyoming formed has puzzled researchers for a long time. But researchers at New York University published research last week that gave some insight into the process.

pxhere via CC0 Public Domain

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many have turned to the great outdoors in an effort to get out of their house but still stay away from people. And with more people out of work, it also helps to be able to fill the freezer. For some, stocking up on food during the pandemic means buying extra meat. For others, it means buying a hunting license and heading into the field. For Tylynn Smith from Laramie, it's her first time going hunting.

Hila Shamon with Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Swift foxes are reddish-brown, a bit smaller than a house cat, with big ears and a long tail. They do their best to sound intimidating when they're live-trapped, but they tend to be quite docile. They were historically found across the Great Plains region from Alberta, Canada down through the central part of the United States, but today, they're only in about 40 percent of that area.

PxHere through Creative Commons CC0

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is urging anglers to modify their routine to protect fish. Hot, dry weather can heat up water temperatures and lower the overall dissolved oxygen in the water, which can stress the fish. 

University of Wyoming

World-renowned archeologist George Frison died this Sunday, Sept. 6 at the age of 95. Frison founded the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department and was the first state archeologist.

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