Ivy Engel

Science News Intern

Ivy is a current undergraduate student at the University of Wyoming. She is studying biology with minors in chemistry, journalism, and business. Hoping to go into science communication upon graduation in 2020, she’s excited to get a taste of the world of broadcast journalism and to share her love of science. In her free time, Ivy enjoys baking, reading, and spending time outdoors.

Jessica Ulysses Grant

Boreal toads were once common in the western part of the United States. Today, the toads, and many other amphibians, are under attack from a deadly skin disease known as chytrid fungus, which limits their ability to obtain oxygen and may lead to cardiac arrest. But somehow toads found in Western Wyoming appear to be fighting back against the disease.

Wikimedia Commons

The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $1 million to the University of Wyoming (UW) to support integration of computer science education in K-8 classrooms and public libraries across the state.

Nathan Maier

In a recent collaboration with University of Montana, University of Wyoming (UW) researchers headed out to explore a little-studied area of the Greenland ice sheet. The team was headed by Neil Humphrey, a UW professor of geology and geophysics, and his graduate student, Nathan Maier.

Tim Evanson via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) has proposed a new rule that will encourage mineral development and reduce permit hoarding in the state. Wyoming is currently a first to file state, meaning the first operator to file for a drilling permit gets it. The common practice has flooded the commission with over 1,000 applications a month

Joe Riis

Results of a recent poll show Wyomingites overwhelming favor protecting the state's wildlife, but support also varies between policies related to conservation.

James Gathany/CDC

Mosquitoes have been a nuisance in Laramie this year with higher than usual numbers. The weather has been both helping them reproduce and hindering control efforts.

Preston L. Chasteen

A recent study called upon the Western U.S. to increase its prescribed burn practice as a preventative for large-scale wildfires. Prescribed burning is used to remove flammable undergrowth and dry, dead patches that add fuel to a wildfire.

Pilot Hill Land Purchase

Wyoming Pathways has been awarded the National 2019 Coalition for Recreational Trails Achievement Award.

Alvesgaspar via Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The City of Laramie regularly tests mosquitos caught in traps for the presence of West Nile Virus. So far, in the month of June, they've tested three samples. Last week, one came back positive. For the Laramie Valley, this is an earlier than usual detection of the virus. 

Catherine Wagner

The lakes in the alpine areas of the Wind River Range have historically been fishless - that is, until humans started stocking them for recreational use. The introduction of these fish changed the ecosystems of the lakes, and specifically, the microscopic animals that float through the water, known as zooplankton. Now, University of Wyoming researchers want to know if the change in zooplankton has influenced a change in the fish.

Jessica Ulysses Grant

Chytrid fungus is a deadly disease that infects amphibians worldwide, and it's considered the worst infectious disease in the history of vertebrates. Once infected, amphibian populations often see drastic declines and sometimes even go extinct.

Ellen Currano

University of Wyoming researchers are "going back to the future." By studying the climate that existed 50 million years ago, they hope to better understand what the climate might be like in the next century.

picryl.com

With summer around the corner, fire season also looms. This year's wet spring has delayed the onset of wildfires compared to last year, but that doesn't necessarily mean the fire season will be less intense than normal. Wyoming State Forester Bill Crapser says fire season can be very hard to predict.

Lusha Tronstad

Alpine areas are predicted to be one of the areas most affected by climate change and some unique microbes have made their homes in the glacier-fed streams there. The loss of these little critters can have large effects on both the ecosystem around them and on people, says University of Wyoming invertebrate zoologist Lusha Tronstad.

Wikimedia Commons

Every year, the University of Wyoming hosts the annual Wyoming Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) conference. The event is focused on inspiring young women, 7th grade through high school, who are interested in STEM subjects to continue in the field by providing them with role models and networks on campus.