COVID-19 In Wyoming: Resources & News

We're here to keep you current on the news surrounding the coronavirus pandemic in Wyoming and around the country.

Pilot Hill Land Purchase

A recent partnership between the Pilot Hill Project and Occidental Petroleum will help protect the 5,500 acre parcel of land east of Laramie from future mineral development. 

A new study has found that long-term air pollution increases COVID-19 mortality rates.

Updated at 7:30 p.m.

President Trump said more oil producers are "getting close to a deal" to try to put a floor under prices as demand for energy plummets amid the global pandemic.

Trump said at his daily coronavirus briefing on Thursday that he'd just finished a conference call with the leaders of Saudi Arabia and Russia and that he hoped they'd agree on a cut or another solution that would stabilize the cost per barrel.

Maggie Mullen

Last weekend, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) sold 153 nonresident fishing licenses, about the same number it sold during the same period of time last year.

University of Wyoming's Pokes Make The Difference Campaign page

University of Wyoming students facing financial hardship due to impacts from the coronavirus can now apply for aid through an emergency fund. The Pokes Make a Difference campaign is collecting donations from the public in order to help students with housing, food, and technology access.

U.S. Census Bureau

The Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes have both mounted outreach efforts to ensure their members have the tools to complete the 2020 census. But the COVID-19 pandemic could get in the way of a complete count on the Wind River Reservation.


This story is powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

On a recent rainy day in Rockville, Utah, cars roared down the highway as Dutch cyclists Marica van der Meer and Bas Baan huddled together underneath the awning of a post office, trying to fix a flat tire.

Wyoming High School Activities Association

The Wyoming High School Activities Association (WHSAA) announced it is canceling spring sports this year.

The 3A/4A high school state basketball tournaments were canceled back in March. Now, WHSAA is furthering cancelations, which will affect outdoor track and field, soccer, golf and tennis.

The microbe known as Verrucomicrobium spinosum, catalogued by microbestiary.org
Dennis Kunkel and James T. Staley

The microbesitary is a University of Wyoming program and website that seeks to illustrate the microbial world.

Updated at 7:38 p.m. ET

President Trump and congressional Democrats appeared to have a ways to go on Wednesday before they could agree on details for more relief spending for the coronavirus disaster.

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NPR News

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Rev. Radu Titonea, a hospital chaplain in Queens, N.Y., about ministry and the celebration of holy days during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Wayne Riley, president of SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, and an NPR science correspondent answer more questions about the racial disparity in how the coronavirus is impacting patients.

Dr. Wayne Riley, president of SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, and an NPR science correspondent answer questions about the racial disparity in how the coronavirus is impacting patients.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

From shows taped in a field to episodes filmed in a hallway, TV's late-night talk show hosts have found a wide variety of ways to keep broadcasting while in social isolation. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has the scoop on who's succeeding and who is stumbling in the effort to keep America laughing in late-night.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

From shows taped in a field to episodes filmed in a hallway, TV's late-night talk show hosts have found a wide variety of ways to keep broadcasting while in social isolation. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has the scoop on who's succeeding and who is stumbling in the effort to keep America laughing in late-night.

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