2020 election


Last summer, I met up with Ben Barto outside the small town of Dubois, Wyo. He's a huge Trump supporter and we were having a conversation about where he thought America was headed. 

"Revolution," he said. "I think it's headed there."

The insurrection in the U.S. Capitol on January 6 stunned the nation and the world. Many lawmakers in the Mountain West played a role in this unprecedented moment in history – whether they have decried President Donald Trump's attempts to overturn a free and fair election or supported his baseless claims.

Prominent Republicans in the region including Sen. Mitt Romney from Utah and Rep. Liz Cheney in Wyoming have condemned the president's conspiracy theories.

Alan Simpson

On Wednesday, pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C., stopping the counting of the electoral vote and forcing House and Senate members, as well as staff and journalists, to evacuate.

Matt Laslo

Members of Wyoming's Congressional Delegation were quickly moved to safety after a group of pro-Trump extremists overtook the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan 6.

Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi informed House lawmakers that Congress will reconvene Wednesday night to continue its constitutional duty to count and certify the electoral votes after pro-Trump protestors breached the Capitol and forced Capitol Police to evacuate both the House and Senate.

A voting machine company based in the Mountain West has become the center of an unfounded conspiracy theory propagated by the president intended to shed doubt on the presidential election.


Democrats once again lost ground in much of the rural West. That includes Montana, where Republicans swept the election for the first time in at least two decades. Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., will soon be the lone progressive holding federal office in the state. He's also the only working farmer in the U.S. Senate and author of a new book, Grounded: A Senator's Lessons On Winning Back Rural America. He spoke about lessons learned from November's election with reporter Nate Hegyi of the Mountain West News Bureau.

2016 presidential map including vote map of Campbell County
New York Times

In 2016, President Donald Trump won Wyoming by the largest margin in the country. In Campbell County, he took 86.7 percent of the vote - the second highest margin in the state, only behind Crook County. This time, there was an even higher voter turnout. Still, Gillette Mayor Louise Carter-King said it still felt different.

While President Donald Trump's accusations of widespread voter fraud are based on no evidence, they are gaining some traction in the region. 

Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., is asking his supporters via text to help fund the president's legal fight, saying, "Dems are stealing the election." 

The constitutional amendment to remove the limit of debt municipalities can have on sewer projects has failed after Tuesday's general election.

Though the majority of votes on the issue were in support of it, those more than 126,000 votes made up only 45 percent of total votes cast in the election. More than 50 percent is the threshold required to amend Wyoming's Constitution.

Montana has long prided itself as a purple state, handing wins to both Democrats and Republicans over the past few decades. 

But on Tuesday night, conservatives won every key race in the state, nabbing a hotly contested U.S. Senate seat, Montana's lone congressional seat, and the governorship.

Lynnette Grey Bull for Congress

 

A record 14 Indigenous people ran for Congress this year from both parties, including six candidates in the Mountain West. Most of them were not successful. But Aliyah Chavez, a reporter and producer for Indian Country Today, says their campaigns still had an impact. She spoke with Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher about the outcomes of those races, the six Native people who will serve in Congress in the upcoming session, and whether they will be able to work across the aisle for Indian Country.


wyodems.org

It was no surprise that President Donald Trump overwhelmingly won Wyoming last night. But Democrats in the state were hoping for wins locally.

NPR

Wyoming voters reminded everyone that it's still a strongly red state. Republicans won the majority of races and three incumbent Democrats were defeated.

Cynthia Lummis

Cheyenne Republican Cynthia Lummis has won the U.S. Senate race in Wyoming. Lummis is a seasoned political figure in the state who served in the U.S. House for eight years from 2009 to 2017 and before that in the state legislature. 

Wyoming Legislature

Gillette State Rep. Roy Edwards has died. The Casper Star Tribune reported on Monday afternoon the 66-year-old died on that morning after a week-long struggle with an unspecified illness.

Quarantined On Election Day? Call Your County Clerk

Nov 2, 2020
CREDIT WYOFILE/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

As COVID-19 cases continue to surge in our state, thousands of Wyomingites will be sick with the coronavirus or under quarantine orders on Election Day. That doesn't mean that they can't cast a ballot.

Wyoming Secretary of State's Office

A University of Wyoming survey shows that Wyomingites favor the president and two other republican candidates for federal office ahead of Tuesday's election.

Lynette Greybull and U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney

On Tuesday, Nov. 3, Wyoming will vote to send two women to congress. Former Republican Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis is running against University of Wyoming Professor Merav Ben-David for retiring Sen. Mike Enzi's U.S. Senate seat. The two differ on almost everything, especially when it comes to health care, climate change and the future of Wyoming's economy.

On the House side, two-term U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney is facing off against Democrat Lynette Greybull who is the first known Native American to seek a Wyoming congressional seat. Greybull told Wyoming Public Radio that she's used her time in the limelight to target some key issues.

Talia Mayden of HUMAN

About a week before Election Day, as the Wind River Reservation was bracing for snow, Wyoming state Rep. Andi Clifford squeezed in some roadside campaigning outside of a community hall in Arapahoe.

"Normally we would've been inside," she said. "But we can't, so we're out here."

Last weekend, as the Wind River Reservation was bracing for snow, Wyoming State Rep. Andi Clifford was squeezing in some campaigning in the parking lot of Great Plains Hall in Arapahoe. 

Caitlin McCoy

Biden's stance on fracking has been all over the news; that the Democratic presidential candidate would prohibit the practice on federal land, while allowing current permits to continue. The presidential election is also expected to impact U.S. coal markets - either way it breaks.

Wyoming Public Radio's Cooper McKim spoke with Caitlin McCoy, a staff attorney at Harvard Law School's environmental and energy law program, about what that might look like.

President Donald Trump is finding ways to continue reaching voters in Nevada through rallies, even as COVID-19 cases climb and state restrictions limit crowds.

Read in English.

Mientras se aproxima el día electoral, algunos estados en Mountain West se están preparando para una posible violencia e intimidación a los votantes, a raíz de la retórica del presidente Donald Trump.

Legal challenges and accusations of fraud are just a couple of the issues seeding doubt about a clear winner in the presidential race on Election Day. 

“My advice for voters this year is patience,” said Ken Miller, a political science professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

As election day approaches, some states in the Mountain West are preparing for potential voter intimidation and violence following rhetoric from President Donald Trump.

Shannon Smith

Wyoming will witness history this year as it elects two women to Congress. Newcomer and Northern Arapaho tribal member, Lynnette Greybull, will face incumbent Liz Cheney for the U.S. House seat. Cynthia Lummis will face ecologist and scientist, Merav Ben-David, for Wyoming's open seat in the Senate. So, what does this mean for the state?

Meg Kelly/NPR

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are holding a final debate Thursday in Nashville, with Kristen Welker of NBC News moderating. After a haphazard first debate, and a canceled second one, this final debate has new rules established by the Commission on Presidential Debates. Follow live updates and analysis.

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Campaigning in a normal election year can be difficult even for the most seasoned politicians. But campaigning during a pandemic adds a host of new challenges. The biggest might be how does a candidate connect with voters safely.

Chip Redmond

Every four years there's a near universal complaint that western issues get passed over in presidential elections. Not this year, which is mostly because large swaths of the West have been burning.

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