Kamila Kudelska

Cody Reporter

Phone: 307 578-4056
Email: kkudelsk@uwyo.edu 

Kamila has worked for public radio stations in California, New York, France and Poland. Originally from New York City, she loves exploring new places. Kamila just received her master in journalism from Columbia University. In her spare time, she enjoys a solid run, a game of squash and recording nature.

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Jackson Hole Police Department

The Teton County Board of Commissioners appointed five members of the community to be on a task force that will help shape the direction of law enforcement in the valley.

This comes after the commissioners received public feedback on budgeting for law enforcement and human services. This was at the same time of the national movement to defund the police. 

Mike Ursuy

Powell residents Mike and Jessie Ursuy were shocked when they drove by a house one evening last week and saw a stuffed dummy with brown overalls on and what looked like a brown mask. The dummy was hanging by its neck, from a noose attached to a tree branch and its hands were bound behind its back.

NPS / Jacob W. Frank

Yellowstone National Park is proposing new opening and closure dates for the East Entrance for the winter season. Currently, the Cody entrance to the national park opens in mid-December and closes in the beginning of March. 

Whitney Western Art Museum

The Whitney Western Art Museum commissioned a painting for the Invisible Boundaries Exhibition. The exhibition explored Yellowstone National Park’s animal migrations. 

James Prosek ended up painting what is now titled, “Yellowstone Composition No. 1” It is very big at 120 by 120 inches. 

Shannon Lastowski Monahan

On a crisp late fall afternoon, Colin Monahan and Shannon Lastowski Monahan were about to relax after a nice dinner with friends at their home in Wapiti, about 20 miles west of Cody towards Yellowstone National Park.

Tedweverka via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

For the first time in nearly 50 years, there will be no winter lodging at Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park.

William F. Wood via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

Environmental groups have issued an intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if the agency does not put the proposal to put wolverines under Endangered Species Act protections back on the table.

Public Domain

As COVID-19 cases and related hospitalizations surge in our state, some public health officers are worried that some individuals who tested positive are not adhering to health safety guidelines and potentially threatening the more vulnerable populations in the state.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Plains Indian Museum

Winter counts are recordings of the Lakota tribal history. The Plains Indian Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West has one winter count that is known as the lone dog winter count. That’s because Lone Dog was the last known keep of this tribal history. It’s a calendar representation of important events between 1800 and 1871.

Image by Paul Brennan from Pixabay

At the start of the pandemic, the CEO of St. John's Hospital in Jackson had a big concern. The hospital runs a Senior Living Center and Paul Beaupre feared an outbreak.

Jonathan Othén, via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced Thursday, October 8, that wolverines in the lower 48 are healthy and will not be put on the threatened species list under the Endangered Species Act.

Wyoming Department of Health

October marks the first month the Wyoming Children's Health Insurance Program is run by the state’s Department of Health. 

Also known as Kid Care CHIP, the program provides health insurance benefits for low-income children. It was previously operated by a private insurance company.

Raif via Flickr

A record 44 people are hospitalized for COVID-19 in the state as of Tuesday, October 6. State officials and health experts have concerns about the pressure this could put Wyoming's small hospitals.

On a frosty early August morning, Jordan Harrison and Corey Anco packed for a day of off-trail hiking in the Beartooth Mountains. Anco is the Draper Natural History Museum assistant curator and Harrison is a field biologist for WEST, Inc.

Kids Ask WhY

A brand new podcast, Kids Ask WhY, will be available showcasing issues Wyoming kids are interested in. The podcast, which debuts on Tuesday, October 6, was developed by the Buffalo Bill Center of the West and Wyoming Public Media. Bob Beck sat down with the producer Kamila Kudelska.

Creative Commons CC0

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Mark Gordon appointed a coronavirus task force. He's since broadened its focus to the cost of healthcare in our state. 

Made up of 40 different stakeholders, including representatives from the state Department of Family Services and the Board of Pharmacy, the goal of the group is to decrease healthcare costs in the state. The governor's health and human service policy advisor Jen Davis said past governors have created a similar task force in the past with no results. 

McCracken Research Library

The McCracken Research Library at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West receives many gifts, donations and loans from patrons. The staff has to go through all the collections to catalog them and also find out what’s in them. 

John Blair

A Wyoming saddlemaker will represent the state at the Made in America product showcase at the White House on Monday, October 5.

Jean Beaufort / CC0

"It all began with an incident that we had two years ago where we had an outfitter and his client that were involved in a grizzly attack," recalled Teton County Sheriff Matt Carr. His office was notified by the client who had fled the scene.

Shirley Ann Higuchi

Nestled in between Cody and Powell in northwest Wyoming, the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center tells the story of over 10,000 Japanese-Americans who were held in the internment camp against their will during World War II. It turns out, the museum wouldn't exist if it weren't for the formerly incarcerated and their children's' dedication.

Chair of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation Shirley Ann Higuchi just released her new book Setsuko's Secret, which tells these stories. To start, Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska asked Higuchi how she learned about her parents' time at Heart Mountain.

Shirley Ann Higuchi

A new book focuses on the importance of having a memorial at Heart Mountain, where Japanese-Americans were imprisoned during World War II. 

Shirley Ann Higuchi is the daughter of former incarcerees at Heart Mountain. In her new book, Setsuko’s Secret, Higuchi tells the story of her parents and many others whose lives were touched by the Japanese-American concentration camp. 

Tim Lumley via Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

The Shoshone National Forest Travel Management plan is facing criticism just as the public comment period comes to a close.

skisg.com

A small community ski slope west of Cody is in the process of moving into private hands after a tumultuous winter season. 

Last spring, Sleeping Giant announced it would be unlikely for the mountain to re-open for the next ski season. The news came after more than ten years of running a deficit. But after community outcry, the nonprofit said they would figure out a way to make it work.

Jessica Ulysses Grant

In 1988, Yellowstone National Park and surrounding areas experienced a huge wildfire. And only a couple of decades later, some of those areas burned again. 

Nathan Gill, an assistant professor of fire ecology at Texas Tech University, has been studying how this affects trees' seeds dispersal. It turns out more frequent fires don't allow enough time for the tree to grow back and spread its seeds. 

Bob Beck

So far, Northwest Wyoming sugar beet producers are happy with their harvest. 

While this week's winter storm had a potential to threaten the crops, Western Sugar Cooperative's Randall Jobman, the north region vice president of agriculture at Western Sugar Cooperative, said thankfully it didn't get cold enough. 

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