Bob Beck

News Director

Phone: 307-766-6626
Email: btwo@uwyo.edu 

Bob Beck has been News Director of Wyoming Public Radio since 1988. During his time as News Director WPR has won over 100 national, regional and state news awards. 

In addition to duties as News Director, Bob is the co-creator, co-host and producer of the news magazine Open Spaces, which has won eight national Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRNDI) awards. Bob has personally won three PRNDI awards for reporting and three regional Edward R. Murrow Awards. He has also won numerous Associated Press and Wyoming Association of Broadcasters awards in his career. 

Bob was given the WEA School Bell Award for education reporting and was honored by the Governor’s Council on Impaired Driving for his reporting. On the television side, Bob has been part of two Emmy Award-winning PBS telecasts. 

In his career, Bob has covered the legislature longer than any Wyoming broadcaster. Additional coverage as a reporter includes events such as the Mark Hopkinson execution, the Jessica Dubroff plane crash, the Matthew Shepard murder and a drunk driving crash that killed eight University of Wyoming Athletes. 

Professionally, he has served on the PRNDI Board and has been state coordinator for the Radio Television Digital News Association and Project Vote Smart.  

Bob taught broadcast news at the University of Wyoming for 20 years and twice was honored with a Top Prof award by the UW Mortar Board.   

Around Laramie, Bob is active in community events. He co-chaired the 2009 Albany County United Way Campaign, served as President of the United Way Board, and has been involved with other non-profit organizations as a board member and volunteer.

Prior to coming to WPR, Bob worked as a News and Sportscaster at stations in Wyoming and Illinois. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Radio-Television from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is a native of Wheaton, Illinois in suburban Chicago.

Ways to Connect

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The Wyoming House Revenue Committee has actually approved a tax bill. Committee members voted to send a 14 cents a pack increase on cigarettes to the House floor. The bill also increases the tax on smokeless tobacco by 12 cents.

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The state Senate Corporations Committee approved a bill that would reform the net metering system for those who use renewable energy to reduce their electricity rates. The vote comes despite opposition from those saying the change would reduce the incentive to install solar.

Rone Tempest


In 1978, one of Wyoming's most infamous killings took place in Rock Springs. Rock Springs Director of Safety Ed Cantrell shot his deputy Michael Rosa, who was in the backseat of a car. Cantrell said he shot Rosa in self-defense, while others suggested that Cantrell was trying to keep Rosa from testifying about local corruption he had witnessed.

Cantrell hired Wyoming Attorney Gerry Spence and was acquitted of first-degree murder in Pinedale. Award-winning investigative journalist Rone Tempest has written about the incident in his new book, The Last Western. He sets the stage by describing Rock Springs at the time.

U.S. House Office of Photography

Wyoming Congresswoman Liz Cheney says her vote to impeach President Donald Trump was done so with a heavy heart, but said she had no choice.

Wyoming PBS

Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon said the state is prepared to protect its energy industry against the Biden administration, but he is concerned that regulations could continue to hurt the state's bottom line.

Stephanie Joyce

The Wyoming Consensus Revenue Estimating Group (CREG) said the state's revenue picture looks brighter. The latest CREG forecast shows an $82 million improvement from October. The news came as the legislature held an opening day session.


Wyoming Public Radio's Capitol Hill Correspondent Matt Laslo was covering the counting of the electoral votes in the U.S. Capitol when it was stormed by Trump supporters this week. Laslo joined Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck and described his experience.

Matt Laslo

Members of Wyoming's Congressional Delegation were quickly moved to safety after a group of pro-Trump extremists overtook the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan 6.

UTAH PUBLIC RADIO

There is a lot of confidence from Wyoming's health officer over the possibility of a vaccine being made available to state residents. But it might take a while before most of us get access to a vaccine, that's because a couple of them are still in the trial phase. Companies are testing vaccines using people from across the country.

One person who's part of the process is Madelyn Beck, she's a former reporter for Wyoming Public Radio who's been closing following COVID-19 as part of her current job as a reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau. She spoke with Bob Beck about what the testing process is like and what interested her in becoming a guinea pig for the secret serum.

University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming plans to start the spring semester classes on January 21. In-person instruction will begin on January 25, with plans to move completely to online classes after a short spring break in April.

Andrew Graham, WyoFile

The Albany County Democratic Party has provided the names of three people to replace Dave O'Malley as the Albany County sheriff. Democrats picked former Sheriff's Deputy Gary Wilken, current University of Wyoming police officer Aaron Appelhans, and Laramie County District Attorney Baend Buus who lives in Albany County.

https://www.nursetogether.com

Saying that too many people have died, Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon issued a statewide mask order from Wednesday, Dec. 9 until Jan. 8, 2021.

Additional orders also close bars and restaurants at 10:00 p.m. and limit the amount of people in most of those facilities to 10 people. Exercise classes in gyms will also be reduced to 10.

Wyoming Department of Health - State of Wyoming


After a summer with relatively few serious cases of COVID-19, Wyoming's hospitals are full and the death toll is rising. Even the governor and first lady have contracted the coronavirus and it shows no signs of letting up. State Health Officer Doctor Alexia Harrist joined Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck to discuss the virus, face coverings and the vaccine.

Bob Beck

Wyoming legislative leaders say they will delay the bulk of the 2021 legislative session until the state's COVID-19 outbreak is under control.

Google Maps

Since the start of the pandemic nursing homes and long term care facilities have been on pins and needles. With some huge outbreaks in facilities across the state, leading to a number of deaths, that anxiety has skyrocketed.

Jonni Belden oversees The Legacy Living and Rehabilitation Center in Campbell County. She joined Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck to describe the challenges they've faced keeping their older residents safe and the impacts this is having on their staff. She started the conversation by discussing challenges faced by residents.

Public Domain

The Legislature's Joint Revenue Committee has voted to recommend approval of a nine cent fuel tax increase to pay for highway maintenance. Wyoming Department of Transportation Director Luke Reiner said WYDOT faces a funding gap of $136 million and the tax increase would help chip away at that.

https://www.nursetogether.com

Albany County will join Laramie County in requiring face coverings to be worn when people are in a public place and if they are lined up outside. 

NPR

Wyoming voters reminded everyone that it's still a strongly red state. Republicans won the majority of races and three incumbent Democrats were defeated.

Wyoming Secretary of State's Office

A University of Wyoming survey shows that Wyomingites favor the president and two other republican candidates for federal office ahead of Tuesday's election.

Wyoming Business Council

This week, Governor Mark Gordon unveiled some final CARES ACT aid. The money will be split between Wyoming businesses and the agriculture community.

The Wyoming Business Council will oversee the distribution and Wyoming Business Council CEO Josh Dorrell joins Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck to explain the funding, starting with the agriculture support.

Lynette Greybull and U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney

On Tuesday, Nov. 3, Wyoming will vote to send two women to congress. Former Republican Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis is running against University of Wyoming Professor Merav Ben-David for retiring Sen. Mike Enzi's U.S. Senate seat. The two differ on almost everything, especially when it comes to health care, climate change and the future of Wyoming's economy.

On the House side, two-term U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney is facing off against Democrat Lynette Greybull who is the first known Native American to seek a Wyoming congressional seat. Greybull told Wyoming Public Radio that she's used her time in the limelight to target some key issues.

Eda Uzunlar

Wyoming's revenue picture looks better than it did in May, but a top state budget analyst told the legislature's Joint Appropriations Committee that it's still not good. 

Screenshot of Wyoming PBS stream

Gov. Mark Gordon says the trend of COVID-19 cases in the state is going straight up.

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