Taylar Stagner

Part-Time News Reporter

Taylar Stagner is Arapaho and Shoshone and was born and raised in Riverton, Wyoming on a cattle ranch. Stagner has her associate's in acting from Central Wyoming College, a bachelor's in American Studies from the University of Wyoming, and is currently working on her master's in American Culture Studies from Bowling Green State University. She has written for Wyoming Public Radio since 2018 as an intern and now works as the Wind River Indian Reservation/Fremont County correspondent.

 

Stagner's research interests are racial justice, Indigenous rights in contemporary systems of oppression, and gender/sexuality.

Jason Baldes

Buffalo on the Wind River Indian Reservation have given birth, setting plans into motion to build a better environment for their future.

The Northern Arapaho Tribe

Wyoming's U.S. Sen. John Barrasso voiced opposition to Deb Haaland during last week's confirmation hearing for secretary of the interior.

wysac.uwyo.edu


Nicole Wagon knew something was wrong days before she would get the news.

SCREENSHOT / CSPAN

Wyoming's congressional lawmakers expressed opposition during Tuesday's confirmation hearing for Secretary of the Interior Department nominee Deb Haaland.

American Indian Science and Engineering Society

The University of Wyoming Native American Program is starting a chapter of a STEM program that focuses on providing support to native students. The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), was founded in 1977 to support Native students and their involvement in STEM programs.

Taylar Dawn Stagner

While there are a few smaller meat processors in central Wyoming, in Riverton a new processing plant looks to keep more and business in its own community.

John Wood


Central Wyoming College (CWC) faculty member Tarissa Spoonhunter is working to make Wyoming's only American Indian Studies associate degree into a practical program that her students can relate to.

Jenni Wildcat

Since December, Wind River Cares has been distributing the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. Distribution is now happening at Great Plains Hall in Arapaho to allow for social distancing while the health care workers administer the vaccines.

Pixabay

The nation's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) civil rights organization reports that Wyoming and many other states need more laws and policies to battle discrimination.

Wind River Start Up Challenge

The Wind River Start-Up Challenge is an annual program that provides seed money, mentorship and workshops for budding entrepreneurs on the Wind River Indian Reservation.

CWC Marketing Team

Central Wyoming College (CWC) has been designated as a Native American Serving Non-Tribal Institution. That means the college will be better equipped to support their Native American students.

Rubena Tillman


On the Wind River Indian Reservation, it's hard to get things like fresh vegetables. And that lack of access is a contributor to the fact that Native Americans on the reservation have a life expectancy 20 years shorter than non-Indigenous people in the state.

Akai GreyBull

After President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were sworn in at the nation's capital a virtual parade was held. Participants from both the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes were invited to dance for a national audience.

Erika Yarber

Wind River Cares, a community-based health organization that serves the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes, is piloting a program in schools to provide proactive care for eligible students.

Taylar Dawn Stagner

There is an excess of homeless dogs in Fremont County and on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Local shelters are trying to keep up with demand, but one group is helping ease the burden.

Taylar Dawn Stagner

According to NPR, Animal shelters across the nation saw an uptick in adoptions during lockdown to cope with isolation. Two Wyoming shelters hope the dogs stay adopted and aren't returned to the shelters because there's now a lack of kennel space due to local courts being backed up.

Division of Criminal Investigation

Due to a large number of missing and murdered Indigenous people, efforts have been made to install a Wind River Indian Reservation specific Amber Alert system.

Taylar Stager

Wyoming has a short growing season and one non-profit is already starting the new year preparing to combat food insecurity on the Wind River Indian Reservation.

Elizabeth Ridgely

Food insecurity is being without access to affordable, healthy food. Historic racism and long drives to a grocery store impede Native people on the Wind River Reservation from access to healthy food.

Ben Pease

In some Native communities getting to a grocery store can take up to an hour and requires access to a vehicle. And there is no guarantee that the food there is fresh, often being trucked in from days away. Tsanavi Spoonhunter is the director of Crow Country: Our Right to Food Sovereignty.

The documentary explores food insecurity on the Crow Reservation in Montana. Wyoming Public Radio's Taylar Stagner spoke with her about the award-winning film and the inspiration that brought her to Montana.

Sue Reynolds

Since August of 2019, there has been a 200 percent increase in teachers, administrators, and the public utilizing a free web service called Everyday Native. It's an online resource that aims to provide educational material.

Taylar Stagner

Riverton Library is quiet today. And sure, libraries are supposed to be quiet places but right now it's extra quiet. Before COVID-19 heath restrictions the Riverton Library was seeing 450 people on average per day with a staff of ten assistant librarians.

Pixabay

About 40% of Wyomingites have a library card, which makes many resources available while staying at home. Curbside pickup, increased access to audiobooks, and e-readers eliminate the need to go inside a library and pick up a book. But librarians across the state are still looking for better ways to help communities access all their services.

Patricia Radar

November is Native American Heritage month and the University of Wyoming's Native American Education, Resource, and Cultural Center recently held a virtual speaker series that attracted about 100 students, faculty, and community members.

Pages