Bob Beck

News Director

Phone: 307-766-6626
Email: btwo@uwyo.edu 

Bob Beck has been News Director of Wyoming Public Radio since 1988. During his time as News Director WPR has won over 100 national, regional and state news awards. 

In addition to duties as News Director, Bob is the co-creator, co-host and producer of the news magazine Open Spaces, which has won nine national Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRNDI) awards. Bob has personally won four PRNDI awards for reporting and four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards. He has also won numerous Associated Press and Wyoming Association of Broadcasters awards in his career. 

Bob was given the WEA School Bell Award for education reporting and was honored by the Governor’s Council on Impaired Driving for his reporting. On the television side, Bob has been part of two Emmy Award-winning PBS telecasts. 

In his career, Bob has covered the legislature longer than any Wyoming broadcaster. Additional coverage as a reporter includes events such as the Mark Hopkinson execution, the Jessica Dubroff plane crash, the Matthew Shepard murder and a drunk driving crash that killed eight University of Wyoming Athletes. 

Professionally, he has served on the PRNDI Board and has been state coordinator for the Radio Television Digital News Association and Project Vote Smart.  

Bob taught broadcast news at the University of Wyoming for 20 years and twice was honored with a Top Prof award by the UW Mortar Board.   

Around Laramie, Bob is active in community events. He co-chaired the 2009 Albany County United Way Campaign, served as President of the United Way Board, and has been involved with other non-profit organizations as a board member and volunteer.

Prior to coming to WPR, Bob worked as a News and Sportscaster at stations in Wyoming and Illinois. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Radio-Television from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is a native of Wheaton, Illinois in suburban Chicago.

Ways to Connect

Wyoming Governor Matt Mead says it is doubtful that his office will propose legislation for the 2012 session on how the state should handle Juvenile offenders. Some reports have claimed that Wyoming incarcerates more Juveniles than any other state. Governor Mead says his office is trying to verify that information and is closely looking at good practices that are taking place in some of the counties in the state. Mead says it has been a difficult issue to resolve, but he does want to find a solution.

Although Wyoming officials oppose a recent court ruling that re-instated the Clinton era roadless rule, a conservationist says the ruling could actually help,not hurt Wyoming's economy. Eric Molvar is a wildlife biologist with the Biodiversity Conservation Alliance. He says Elk gather in roadless areas, so he says the ruling could help the economy through increased hunting opportunities.

K-12 education reform has the interest of University of Wyoming President Tom Buchanan, who joins Bob Beck to talk about that and other subjects. Buchanan says the work legislative committees are doing will benefit the state.

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