Artist

If this was a normal year, right now, thousands of people would be flocking to the middle of the northern Nevada desert to watch “The Man” burn. But it’s not a normal year, and this year’s Burning Man counterculture outdoor festival has been canceled along with many, many live events across the region. That’s taking its toll on the arts, the community and the economy. 

West Edge Collective

Downtown Cheyenne will host the fifth annual Paint Slingers street festival on July 18 and 19. Attendees are invited to celebrate urban art culture and watch regional artists in action. Desiree Brothe is one of the event organizers and said there’s something for everyone.

Angus Thuermer


Being gay in Wyoming can be challenging, but LGBTQ activist, and performing artist, Andrew Munz has decided to stay and try to make things better. Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery spoke to Munz about art, activism, and growing up in the cowboy state.

Jason Hammock

A new virtual gallery has made it possible for those self-distancing to still enjoy the arts. It Takes A Village is the brainchild of Cheyenne-based artist Bria Hammock and is Wyoming's first quarantine-friendly art gallery. 

Jennifer Carrigan

The Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area announced its four artists in residence for the coming summer.

Cristy Anspach

A Pinedale artist has a new show on display that was inspired by…roadkill. Cristy Anspach has spent the last two and a half years making ceramic jars to honor each animal killed on her route between Boulder and Pinedale. Over the course of eight months she made 110 jars. The show, titled "Unintended Consequences" will be on display at the Mystery Print Gallery until March 1.

Anspach talked to Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery about finding beauty in death and how every creature deserves respect.

Robert Martinez

Governor Mark Gordon honored five Wyoming artists with the 2019 Governor's Arts Award, including visual artist and graphic designer Robert Martinez. Martinez is Northern Arapaho and Chicano, and grew up in a family of talented painters and beadworkers on the Wind River Reservation. He draws and paints portraits using bright, contrasting tones in a style intended to challenge the viewer's assumptions of what Native people and Native art should look like.

"You see many depictions of Natives as black and white or sepia toned, and that connotes to a dead culture," Martinez said. "So, one of the things I was doing with this bright paint was I wanted to show that we're not dead, we're alive and strong."

Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher visited Martinez at his studio outside of Riverton and talked with him about his work and what it means to be one of only a few people of color ever awarded the state's top artistic honor.

Cooper McKim

Your phone, your house, your car. It all originally comes from the earth. Artist Nina Elder is fascinated by the complexity of land being at once something beautiful, sometimes sacred, and often extremely valuable - providing resources that the modern world depends on. Through long journeys to mining-based communities, Elder collects found materials and creates intricate drawings that help tell the multilayered stories that lands have to tell.

She's been supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation, Rauschenberg Foundation, and the Pollock Krausner Foundation. Elder has been features in VICE Magazine, PBS and Art In America. She's also held positions as an Art + Environment Research Fellow at the Nevada Museum of Art and Polar Lab Research Fellow. Wyoming Public Radio's Cooper McKim speaks with Elder about her latest exhibit now at the University of Wyoming's Visual Arts Building called Nina Elder: Accumulations.

Savannah Maher

Jackson's Snow King Sports Center usually hosts skating lessons and peewee hockey games. But for one weekend in mid-September, it was filled with about $50 million worth of art.

The space had been taken over by the brand new Jackson Hole Fine Arts Fair. Visitors were greeted at the door by a giant inflatable goldfish — the work of Jackson artist Bland Hoke — before visiting booths from more than 50 galleries based all over the country.


Courtesy of the Tony Foster Foundation

The Whitney Western Art Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West hosted explorer artist Tony Foster for a week. For the past 35 years, Foster takes journeys to paint wild areas…many of them in the American West. Before his residency at the Buffalo Bill Center, he went on a rafting journey on the Green River. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska spoke with Foster to get a better understanding of what it means to be an explorer artist today.

Catherine Wheeler

The Ucross Foundation's ranch is usually very quiet and serene, but tonight, the art gallery that sits on the grounds is filled with the sounds of people and the art itself.

Catherine Wheeler

A Wyoming artist, James Jackson has received a National Heritage Fellowship. It's the nation's highest honor that celebrates traditional and folk art. Jackson is most well-known for his intricate leather carving and spent most of his career at King's Saddlery in Sheridan. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler sat down with Jackson in his leather shop at the Brinton Museum to talk about how his career has been infused with Wyoming's culture.

The Brinton Museum will display a new exhibit featuring the work of an artist as she explores the story of her mother's decline into dementia.

Photo courtesy The Brinton Museum

The Brinton Museum in Big Horn, Wyoming, is home to a collection of artifacts and objects from many Plains Indian tribes. As it open for the season, the Brinton along with the Center for American Indian Research and Native Studies put together an exhibit centered around the Lakota creation story. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler sat down with Craig Howe, the director of the Center for American Indian Research, to talk about how the story has an impact today.

Catherine Wheeler

The American West has inspired countless artists. But that holds especially true for one prominent artist from the region. Gabe Leonard is a Gillette native who calls himself the "Cinematic Artist."

Catherine Wheeler / Wyoming Public Media

A Gillette art and framing shop held a show over the weekend featuring three generations of artists to spotlight the region's art community.

Anna talks about perceptions, boundaries and expectations that confine Native American Art. Using video, sculpture, installations, and photographs, Anna explores themes of Native identity through contemporary mediums, forcing people to readjust how they think of Native-American aesthetics.

Tim Lawson

Tim Lawson is a nationally recognized painter. He grew up in Sheridan and has recently moved back, after living all over the U.S. Now, his hometown is celebrating his work with a show at SAGE Community Arts. The exhibition runs through January 2. On Thursday, November 15, Lawson will give an artist talk at the WYO Theatre, followed by a reception at SAGE. Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones spoke with Lawson.

Winston Churchill / Heather James Fine Art

Winston Churchill is known for being the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II and helping lead the allied powers to victory. But in addition to being a statesman, Churchill was also an accomplished amateur artist, submitting his work to shows under pseudonyms.

Now, eleven of his paintings are on display at Heather James Fine Art in Jackson through September 16, and on September 11 there will be a reception for the exhibit. Churchill’s great-grandson Duncan Sandys is attending the reception. He spoke with Wyoming Public Radio's Caroline Ballard about what led Churchill to paint.

National Museum of Wildlife Art/James Prosek

In recent years, scientists have been astounded to learn how far large animals like elk, pronghorn and mule deer migrate in Wyoming. But a new show at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson looks at both the great and small creatures that travel to and fro to reach the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards sat down with painter and writer James Prosek to talk about evolution, language and whether to name waterfalls.

Kamila Kudelska

When museums have special exhibitions, what visitors don't know is that it takes years for the exhibit to evolve from a concept to the moment you are standing in front of that famous work of art. The Whitney Western Art Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West just opened its new exhibit featuring the famous Western American artist, Albert Bierstadt. But the process behind securing loans is not so easy.

Albert Bierstadt—He’s a late 19th-century artist, most well-known for his majestic landscape paintings of the Wind River Range, Yellowstone and the American West. But there's more to him than paintings of grand open spaces. The Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody and the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma worked together to create an exhibit exploring Bierstadt’s influence on conservation and wildlife management in America. It’s called Albert Bierstadt: Witness to the Changing West. Kamila Kudelska speaks talks to three museum curators as they tell the little-known story of a beloved American artist. 

Hunter Old Elk


The Plains Indian Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West has partnered with the Creative Indigenous Collective (CIC). A group of Northern Plains indigenous artists created the collective to promote contemporary native art. This is the first time the Plains Indian Museum is partnering with modern artists. 

Ucross Foundation

A new art exhibition, up now at the Ucross Gallery in northern Wyoming, takes a contemporary look at the image of the horse. Printmaker Mark Ritchie was inspired to invite artists from around the world to submit their work after attending a horse-focused art workshop in Hungary. 

Jave Yoshimoto

Omaha-based artist Jave Yoshimoto’s distinct style of painting blends traditional Japanese woodblock, Chinese brush painting, and comic book-like graphics.

Zenka is an artist and a futurist. “I mix new tech with collaboration structures to form strategies to improve the outcome of future. Exponential growth - the ability for something to change drastically rather than slowly - has forever changed the way I see the world. Change can be scary but it also can be good, especially if we can think ahead and create a strategy and a clear vision for the world we want to build.”

Cheech Marin On Wyoming Sounds

Sep 22, 2017
Grady Kirkpatrick

Thanks to legend Cheech Marin, comedian, actor, activist, and art collector who was a guest DJ this morning on Wyoming Sounds.

Ortegon

  

This week the University of Wyoming hosted a summer institute for an organization that supports women of color in academia. One of the guest speakers was Sarah Ortegon, artist and former Miss Native American USA. Wyoming Public Radio’s Maggie Mullen spoke with Ortegon about her paintings currently exhibited at the UW Art Museum, partly inspired by her childhood on the Wind River Reservation. Her work will be exhibited until September 2.

Executive Director of the Grand Teton Music Festival shares his philosophy of music and sports and how they share similarities of passion and discipline.

Melodie Edwards

There’s a long tradition of what’s called plein aire art in the West. That’s when an artist paints right there in the great outdoors. But for 40 years, one Laramie artist has taken this technique to new heights…literally. You could almost call his work thin air painting. Joe Arnold has painted from the tops of some of the world’s most majestic mountains. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards decided to scale a Wyoming mountain with Arnold to see it through his eyes.

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