Police

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It's been a month of turmoil for the Jackson Police Department. Two officers resigned in mid-August after a post about a sexual assault investigation on the department's Facebook page drew community outrage.

Just after that, an investigation by the Jackson Hole News and Guide uncovered another incident that raises questions about the culture of the department. Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher spoke with the News and Guide's investigative and justice reporter Emily Mieure about what she found.

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Update 8/21/20 5:00 p.m.: According to the Jackson Hole News and Guide, the officer who wrote the blotter has resigned from the Jackson police. 

Last week, a post on the Jackson Police Department's Facebook page drew outrage, including from advocates for victims of sexual assault.

The post on the department's Facebook blotter made light of an investigation of an alleged sexual assault of a minor. The department's Facebook blotter usually uses humor to share police matters with the public. But this time much of the public felt it went too far.

Eda Uzunlar/Wyoming Public Media

Thousands have taken to the streets across the country, and right here in Wyoming, to call for an end to unchecked police misconduct. An investigation by Wyoming Public Radio and the Casper Star-Tribune found that in Wyoming law enforcement accountability can be a long, uncharted and demanding process. Naina Rao spoke with reporters Tennessee Watson and Shane Sanderson about what they found.

ACLU Wyoming

The ACLU of Wyoming is hosting a virtual forum this weekend, providing space for a discussion about police brutality. The call-in forum encourages communities of color and victims of police brutality to share their stories.

Protests are unfolding across the country over the death of Elijah McClain at the hands of police in Aurora, Colo. Now, frustration is also building over local law enforcement’s use of force this past weekend at a vigil in Aurora honoring him — frustration that was visible at a city council meeting Tuesday night dedicated to the response. 

Andrew Graham, WyoFile

In February, Albany County Sheriff David O'Malley dismissed concerns raised by a Laramie resident about a controversial deputy by telling a county human resources official that the complainant needed "professional help" and was "difficult to listen to."

Protests against racism and police brutality continue in Colorado, but there are many faces and voices that are missing. Here, four Colorado women who are Black activists and scholars share their thoughts on what this moment means to them. They’ve opted out of protests, due to health complications or because they’re participating in other ways. Scroll down for their full bios. 

Conor Mullen


Protesting racism and police brutality is nothing new. But large, sustained turnouts, especially in small, mostly white towns, is something we've not seen before. For many of these protesters, it's their first time demonstrating - ever.

Catherine Wheeler

Buffalo, Wyoming is a small Western town with fewer than 5,000 residents. The historic Occidental Hotel still stands on Main Street. Murals of horses paint the sides of old brick buildings. Buffalo's most widely attended event is a four-day long festival that celebrates a fictional sheriff in town based on Buffalo and Johnson County.

Kamila Kudelska

As the protests erupt throughout the nation and state over police brutality, some law enforcement officials have come out speaking against George Floyd's killing at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer. Cody Police Chief Chuck Baker released a joint statement with the Powell Police and Park County Sheriff departments describing themselves appalled by the use of force.

Chief Baker spoke at a rally in Cody saying he was there to listen. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska sat down with the Cody police chief to hear what he learned from being present at the rally.

Savannah Maher

It's been three weeks since George Floyd was killed by a Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes. Floyd's killing has sparked unrest across America, including in parts of Wyoming that aren't used to seeing protests. From Laramie and Casper to Gillette, Riverton, and even small towns like Dubois and Pinedale, people in our state are speaking out against racism and police violence against Black people. At many of these vigils, marches and demonstrations, Black Wyomingites are leading the way.

 

Cooper McKim

It's a hot, sunny day as Black Lives Matter protesters stand at a busy intersection in Laramie. It's during one of the daily protests in town that began in early June.

The ongoing protests over police brutality is highlighting another ongoing issue: the militarization of police departments.

Maggie Mullen

On a windy Wednesday evening, local protesters filled the sidewalks of downtown Laramie wearing masks and holding signs with messages like, "Black Lives Matter" and "Silence = Violence."

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A memorial was held Thursday for George Floyd, who died last week after a police officer pressed a knee into his neck while detaining him in Minneapolis, triggering protests across the country.

In front of a golden casket and flower bouquets, and against a backdrop of artwork depicting Floyd saying, "I can breathe now," his brother Philonise shared memories of growing up together, eating banana mayonnaise sandwiches and sleeping in the same bed as kids.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

U.S. Attorney General William Barr on Thursday defended the decision to order that protesters be driven back from a park near the White House this week and said extremist groups were involved in sometimes violent demonstrations in the aftermath of George Floyd's death.

Savannah Maher


More than 100 people gathered at Riverton City Park on Monday night to honor George Floyd, the 46-year-old Black man who died last week after a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes. Demonstrators chanted "Black Lives Matter" and "Justice for Floyd" along Federal Boulevard before holding a candlelight vigil for Floyd. The event, which was organized by young people from the Wind River Reservation, remained peaceful.

Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher compiled this audio postcard from the vigil, featuring the voices of Black and Indigenous demonstrators.

A lawsuit alleging the Albany County Sheriff's Department violated a sexual assault victim's civil rights will move forward, according to a federal judge's ruling Tuesday, May 12.

Casper Police Department Facebook page

The Casper Police Department (CPD) is offering a new optional video 9-1-1 service for the next 30 days. The service, called 911eye, will allow callers to share video and location data from their phone with emergency dispatchers.

Flickr Creative Commons

Officers with the Riverton Police Department will soon be equipped with body cameras. According to Police Chief Eric Murphy, the change comes in response to the recent deadly shooting of Anderson Antelope by a Riverton Police Officer.

Savannah Maher

Some residents of Fremont County are calling for the release of more information about a September police shooting that killed 58-year-old Anderson Antelope and the encounter that led up to it.

Savannah Maher

After weeks of back and forth with the county attorney, Fremont County Coroner Mark Stratmoen has called off a public inquest into the September police shooting that killed Anderson Antelope. In a Thursday morning press release, Stratmoen wrote that his office has been "obstructed from completing the process" and that the manner of Antelope's death will be certified as "undetermined."

Savannah Maher

It's been just over two months since a police officer shot and killed 58-year-old Anderson Antelope outside of a Walmart store in Riverton. This afternoon, Fremont County Attorney Patrick Lebrun released a statement saying that the officer's actions were justified, and that his office will take no further action on the case.

https://www.tinker.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/845444/emergency-dial-911/

The Teton County Communications Center has less than half of the staff it needs to answer emergency calls. The County Sheriff is asking the county commissioners to increase the salary of dispatchers in an effort to address the shortage.

Flickr Creative Commons

 

State lawmakers and police are looking for new solutions to a loophole that has long allowed non-Native people some degree of immunity from law enforcement on the Wind River Reservation.

Tennessee Watson / Wyoming Public Radio

Monday marked a year since Albany County Sheriff's Deputy Derek Colling shot and killed Robbie Ramirez, an unarmed man with mental illness. The police accountability group which formed after Ramirez's death is still seeking action from county officials and hosted a rally on the courthouse steps Nov. 4.

Savannah Maher

On a sunny October afternoon two weeks after the police shooting of 58-year-old Anderson Antelope, dozens marched down a busy street in Riverton chanting "Justice for Andy."

Savannah Maher

Two days after a police officer shot and killed 58-year-old Anderson Antelope in front of a Walmart store in Riverton, Fremont County Coroner Mark Stratmoen announced that he would convene a public inquest.

Savannah Maher

It's been nearly a week since a man was shot and killed by law enforcement outside of a Walmart store in Riverton. Last night, community members held a vigil for the man, who has been identified as 58-year-old Anderson Antelope, a citizen of the Northern Arapaho Tribe.

Savannah Maher

Members of the Northern Arapaho community held a candlelight vigil last night for Anderson "Andy" Antelope, the 58-year-old man shot and killed by law enforcement in front of a Walmart store in Riverton on Saturday, September 21.

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