Journalism

America’s biggest supermarket chain is removing free publication racks from its stores beginning this month, prompting criticism from alternative weekly newspaper publishers. 

“These are some of our largest distribution sites,” said John Weiss, founder of the Colorado Springs Independent. “As fewer people are reading the dailies, more people are getting their newspaper fix from a free weekly. It’s hard to beat our price.”

Many parts of the Mountain West are news deserts -- and it’s getting worse. More than 20 counties in our region have no local newspaper. The ones that are left are struggling. And research suggests news deserts contribute to low voter turnout and increasing partisanship

Wyoming Public Radio Wins Four National Native Media Awards

Aug 2, 2019
Anna Rader

The Native American Journalists Association has recognized two Wyoming Public Media (WPM) reporters for their news features. Wyoming Public Radio News won four awards in the annual National Native Media Awards competition. 

The Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA)  announced Tuesday the winners of the 2019 national Edward R. Murrow Awards. These awards honor the highest caliber journalism being produced by radio, television and online news organizations around the world. The Mountain West News Bureau's Amanda Peacher won best in feature reporting for her story on a student in Boise experiencing homelessness.

Wyoming Public Radio News has been awarded a 2019 National Edward R. Murrow award in the small market category for Best Use of Sound. It was for Cooper McKim's story, Scientists Race To Research Stonefly Species Threatened By Climate Change.

Wyoming Public Radio & Media Wins Four National PRNDI Awards

Jun 17, 2019
Maggie Mullen

Wyoming Public Radio and Media won four national awards at the annual Public Radio News Directors conference in Washington D.C. over the weekend. Reporter Cooper McKim won first place for Best Use of Sound in Division B for his story on how scientists are following the fate of a stonefly species that can only be found in mountain streams. 

Anna Rader

Tennessee Watson, an education reporter with Wyoming Public Media, was selected as a Nieman Fellow by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard. Following her year as a Nieman Fellow, she will have additional support as an Abrams Nieman Fellow to do an investigative project on juvenile justice in Wyoming. 

Three Wyoming Public Media reporters were awarded four Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards honoring outstanding achievement in broadcast and digital journalism. 

PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs

The Cody High School Broadcast Journalism program has produced a news piece on how a six-student school in Wyoming is surviving. The report was a collaboration with PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs. The collaboration has professional journalists help to guide students in their reporting and producing.

It can be hard to escape national political news. On the flip side, it's getting harder to find out what's going on in our own backyard. In our region, we've lost around 70 local papers in recent years. A new study says that trend is contributing to today's partisan politics.

Melodie Edwards

This week Wyoming Public Media engaged in a bit of an experiment. Reporters Tennessee Watson and Melodie Edwards set up a pop-up newsroom at the third annual Wyoming Conference for Violence Prevention and Response hosted in Riverton. They joined Caroline Ballard for a conversation about the newsroom and its goals.

The Rocky Mountain News. The South Idaho Press. The Lone Peak New Utah.

These long-gone newspapers range from a Pulitzer-winning metro-area daily to small weeklies in rural towns. All are victims of an ongoing trend that’s pummeling the local American newspaper.

On Thursday night, President Trump rallied in Montana for Republican candidates. At the rally, he congratulated a Montana congressman for body-slamming a reporter last year.

Newspapers across the Mountain West have faced troubling times recently. There have been layoffs, budget cuts and, on Tuesday morning, Montana’s biggest alternative weekly was abruptly shut down by its parent company.

The Denver Post wasn’t dying, says Larry Ryckman; it was being murdered.

“We were under attack by our own owners,” says Ryckman, who was until recently senior editor of news at the newspaper.

The Pew Research Center is reporting that more than a third of large newspapers laid off staff in the last year or so, including in our region.

When The Denver Post laid off about a third of its newsroom earlier this year, senior editor for news Larry Ryckman left to start something new, The Colorado Sun.

Wyoming Public Radio Wins Two National PRNDI Awards

Jun 25, 2018

Wyoming Public Radio has won two national first-place awards from Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI). Reporter Melodie Edwards won first place for Best Use of Sound in Division B which recognizes stations with news staff sizes between 4 and 7 people. HumaNature also won first place in Division B for Best Station Podcast.  

In 2016, a wealthy Utah family bought The Salt Lake Tribune, Utah’s biggest newspaper.  Now, the owner has shrunk the 90-person newsroom to just 56, citing waning ad revenue and dropping print circulation. It joins a growing pattern across the country and the Mountain West.

Casper Star-Tribune's Facebook Page

Newsroom staff at the Casper Star-Tribune are starting the process of forming a union.

Content from the Branding Iron. Layout by Tennessee Watson

An interaction between the UW Police Department and the UW student newspaper has prompted the university to clarify its policy regarding the rights and obligations of student journalists.

 

In a November 3 article, Branding Iron reporter Destiny Irwin reported on allegations that an unnamed resident assistant sexually assaulted women in a dorm. Irwin quoted Resident Assistant Rachel MacDonald, who said the incidents caused Residence Life to change its hiring practices.

 

Vicky Morales

The National Scholastic Press Association has awarded a Wyoming high school student second place for Broadcast News Story of the Year.

Vicky Morales, a junior at Cody High School, won the award for a news story she produced last year on organ donation month.

Wikipedia

The Wyoming Supreme Court has ruled that government agencies can charge media organizations and individuals for certain costs associated with producing electronic public records.

  

The Board of Trustees at Northwest College in Powell voted Monday night to eliminate the college’s journalism program, along with two other programs.

Trustees voted 4 to 2 to cut the journalism program. Northwest President Stefani Hicswa had recommended the cut amid a $2 million budget shortfall.

A spokesperson for the college said the recommendation was made after a thorough cost-benefit analysis. 

Journalism professor Rob Breeding is disappointed that the decades-old program is going away.

Northwest College

As Northwest College in Powell faces a $2 million budget crunch, its president is recommending cutting a handful of programs to save some money. One is the school’s journalism program, which supports its student newspaper.

Professor Rob Breeding is the entire journalism department at Northwest, and advisor to The Northwest Trail student paper. He says the move to cut journalism is about more than cost-savings.

“There are ulterior motives,” says Breeding. “It relates to silencing the first amendment rights of this student newspaper.”

Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake McLaughlin / Flickr

Journalist Bob Woodward, famous for exposing the Watergate Scandal, was the keynote speaker at the 2014 Wyoming Forum in Cheyenne yesterday.

He talked about the work he did with Carl Bernstein at the Washington Post that contributed to President Nixon’s resignation. He also discussed the presidency of Obama, who he characterized as failing to connect with Congress or convey strength abroad, despite his admirable goals.

Woodward says he’s concerned about growing polarization in American society.