Film

A love of apocalyptic horror films may have actually helped people mentally prepare for the COVID-19 pandemic. At least, that's according to research published this month in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.


Ben Kraushaar


In 2018, a Wyoming research scientist ran 92 miles in just three days. His goal? Highlight the challenges of the seasonal migration for mule deer; a well-known species in Wyoming, but also one that's been in decline. A movie called 92 Miles is set to come out in the next few months about his journey. Wyoming Public Radio's Cooper McKim spoke with Wyoming Migration Initiative research scientist and runner Pat Rodgers on the importance of his trek.

Ben Pease

In some Native communities getting to a grocery store can take up to an hour and requires access to a vehicle. And there is no guarantee that the food there is fresh, often being trucked in from days away. Tsanavi Spoonhunter is the director of Crow Country: Our Right to Food Sovereignty.

The documentary explores food insecurity on the Crow Reservation in Montana. Wyoming Public Radio's Taylar Stagner spoke with her about the award-winning film and the inspiration that brought her to Montana.

WYO Film Festival

As statewide public health orders aimed at slowing the spread of the coronavirus are being lifted over time, more public events are resuming. Many film festivals around the world have had to cancel or change their formats to limit risks. But for the WYO Film Festival in Sheridan, the shows will go on in-person, with some modifications. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler spoke with the festival's director Justin Stroup.

A new documentary revealing one Marine's experience of the Vietnam War is screening in Cheyenne at the Terry Bison Ranch Drive-In on Sunday, July 19 at 9 p.m.

"We're just trying to always figure out a way to call attention to these amazing places and this amazing country where we live and the incredible wildlife that surrounds us." David Rohm

This interview with David Rohm discusses their work at Wild Excellence Films. Wild Excellence Films was awarded a Spark grant from Wyoming Humanities for their documentary Golden Eagles: Witnesses to a Changing West, and focused on Native American cultural and spiritual significance and relationship to the golden eagle—that will educate the public about golden eagles and a biologically diverse and threatened region. The film is expected to air on Wyoming PBS in 2023, and a screening is planned at the Center of the West in Cody in early fall of 2022.  For more information go to ThinkWY.org.

Caldera Productions

Two documentaries from Caldera Productions, a film company out of Lander, are up for three regional Emmy Awards this year. The Heartland Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) nominated "The State of Equality" for best historical documentary and best musical composition and arrangement, and "Ferret Town" for best feature among environmental subjects.

Public Domain

The spring season of the Northwest Wyoming Film Series begins the week of January 27. The film series is entering its eighth season of showing signature films for people in the northwest region. Harriet Bloom-Wilson, a board member of the series, said it allows residents of the Bighorn Basin the opportunity to see more than just Hollywood films.

Alpheus Media

 

A documentary film produced on the Wind River Reservation will air on PBS stations around the country on Monday, November 11.

Smithsonian Channel

On Sunday, March 10, the Smithsonian Channel is premiering a new four-part series focused on Yellowstone National Park. The series was produced by Grizzly Creek Films based in Bozeman, Montana.

Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska spoke with Thomas Wilson, the executive producer, and Eric Bendick, a producer and writer for the series, to get a behind the scenes of how wildlife focused series is created. First Bendick answered how the series tries to differentiate from well-known Yellowstone stories.

A film festival highlighting women athletes is showing in Laramie this week. The No Man's Land Film Festival started in Carbondale, Colorado and now travels around the world with the goal of making the adventure and sports film genre more diverse.

Jackson Tisi

A new short film follows a young Arapaho skateboarder from Riverton. It's called Good Medicine and is a part of 365 Days of Love, a project exploring the concept of love around the nation and world. The film was produced by Sofia Vergara and explores different concepts of what good medicine could be to different generations and features different generational perspectives on what good medicine can be.

Ben Moon

Doug Peacock spent much of his life alone in the wilderness in Montana and Wyoming observing grizzly bears. Director Ben Moon just released a short film titled Grizzly Country focusing on Peacock's life and connection to grizzlies. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska spoke with Doug Peacock about how grizzly bears helped him after returning from Vietnam and why he believes they need to continue to be protected.

Jen Tennican

A Jackson Hole documentary filmmaker, Jennifer Tennican, is premiering her film "Hearts of Glass" at the Wild and Scenic Film Festival in Northern California later this month. The film follows the trials of the first 15 months of the Vertical Harvest project.

Kids! It's almost Halloween, but this year your spooky shenanigans can last longer than October 31. The Cheyenne Youth Short Film Festival presents the 2018 Fear Film Fest. Anyone under 18 from anywhere in Wyoming is invited to create their own suspense/thriller film.

Western films are iconic like Stagecoach, The Magnificent Seven and High Noon. But has the Western genre lost its popularity in the modern days of the Avengers and superheroes? Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska asked film critic, Dr. Andrew Patrick Nelson, whether the genre is really dying or just changing?

Shawn Parker

On October 5 through 7, the Sheridan WYO Film Festival will kick off its new event by showing Miss Snake Charmer. The world premiere will be in good company with 33 other films from all over the world. There were over 600 entrants from 54 countries.

Archives On The Air 9: Terror In The Theaters—Julius Blaustein Papers

Jun 28, 2018
American Heritage Center

  

Science fiction movies in the 1950s often masked real fears and anxieties of the Cold War era. One of the common themes was a fear that technology would lead to the destruction of the planet.

Ghost of the Mountains, Brian Leith Productions with Disneynature Productions and Chuan Films

The Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival attracted an international audience this week for what many call the Oscars of nature film. Finalists included Wyoming filmmaker Shane Moore. Moore started making films when he was just 12 and growing up in Granite Creek, 30 miles southeast of Jackson. He met pioneers of nature shows, including the Wild Kingdom and Walt Disney, on his family ranch where they came to film. Moore was a finalist for two films, Born in China and Ghost of the Mountains. Both feature the rarely seen and rarely filmed snow leopard.

Katsey Long

In 1994, between 500,000 and 1,000,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed in the Rwandan genocide. The documentary Forgiveness: The Secret of Peace tells the story of Father Ubald, a Tutsi and Catholic priest in Rwanda. He escaped the genocide, but most of his family and parishioners were killed. He now preaches a message of forgiveness and reconciliation between perpetrators and victims, and holds widely attended “healing masses.”  

Ghost of the Mountains, Brian Leith Productions with Disneynature Productions and Chuan Films

Hundreds of filmmakers are gathering at Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park this week for a biennial film competition that attracts filmmakers from around the globe.

"It's incredible, I mean there's more than 800 people attending this festival from all over the world so it definitely is the Oscars of wildlife filmmaking," said Jackson filmmaker Shane Moore.

The Modern West 26: Going To The Movies

Aug 15, 2017

Wyoming is the setting for many a Western—even if the films aren’t shot on location. But even if big studios pass the state by, Wyomingites are making their own movies. 

After spending the past decade working primarily in New York City as an actress on stage, TV and for the Metropolitan Opera, Oakley Boycott of Lander is playing the character of Nancy in the sci-fi western film, The Rider. Director, writer, and leading actor Jesse Judy says the part was written for Boycott. 

“Oddly enough, the part that I wrote, the woman in mind was actually Oakley Boycott. Oakley read the part exactly how I envisioned writing it.”

Jennifer Tennican

Vertical Harvest is finishing up its first year of operation. The hydroponic, or soil-less, greenhouse is located in downtown Jackson, and not only provides locally grown produce, but also employs 15 people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

Bringing History To Life In Film And On The Page

May 5, 2017
Clay Landry

The era of the mountain man was brief—the high point of the Rocky Mountain beaver fur trade was between 1820 and 1840. But the period still holds fascination today. Clay Landry has written extensively on the subject.

He’ll be speaking on non-fiction writing at the Wyoming Writers Conference June 2-4 in Gillette. As Landry told Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer, he recently served as a historical advisor for the 2016 film The Revenant.

Photo by Arundathi Nair

With the fossil fuel industry in a decline, policy makers, industry executives, and environmental activists are faced with some hard questions about Wyoming's energy future. The topic captured the attention of Arundathi Nair, a 9th grader at Laramie High School. She recently won C-Span's StudentCam 2017 competition for her film "Fossil Fuels to Renewables," which promotes seeking solutions through discussion rather than debate.

Nair's film can be viewed here.

 

thebeardedladyproject.com

A University of Wyoming scientist has created a documentary to celebrate women in paleontology.

Ellen Currano said she and a friend, filmmaker Lexi Jameison Marsh, conceived of the project after a hard day in their separate fields. Both women had felt like outsiders who were not taken as seriously as their male colleagues.

Flickr Creative Commons

A bill to incentivize movie production companies to film in Wyoming passed the Wyoming Senate today. 

Senate File 24 will give the Wyoming Tourism Board more flexibility when it comes to reimbursing certain costs of film making to production companies, and investments in those production companies.

Douglas Senator Brian Boner said movie production itself won't bring revenue directly into the state, but it could attract tourism.

  

On Monday, January 16 at 9 p.m., Wyoming PBS will air a new documentary set in Wyoming called What Was Ours, directed by Mat Hames. It’s about three Native Americans on the Wind River Indian Reservation and their relationship to artifacts and ceremonial objects and how hard it can be to keep such things within the tribe. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards spoke with two people who appear in the film, Northern Arapaho members Jordan Dresser and former Powwow Princess Mikala Sunrhodes.

A new documentary that premiered in Wyoming on September 9 and 10, tells the stories of three Native Americans from the Wind River Indian Reservation and their quest to find and reclaim tribal artifacts locked away in museums and other storage facilities.

Mat Hames is the director of the new film, What Was Ours, which was commissioned by Wyoming PBS. Hames says the film follows an Eastern Shoshone elder and two Northern Arapaho youths, a journalist and a powwow princess, as they track down artifacts that belonged to Native Americans at the turn of the last century.

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