Congressman Cynthia Lummis

Senator Mike Enzi

After more than two decades of representing Wyoming in the United States Senate, Mike Enzi is retiring. Some of his colleagues say his departure is going to leave a huge deficit in the upper chamber.

Shannon Smith

Wyoming will witness history this year as it elects two women to Congress. Newcomer and Northern Arapaho tribal member, Lynnette Greybull, will face incumbent Liz Cheney for the U.S. House seat. Cynthia Lummis will face ecologist and scientist, Merav Ben-David, for Wyoming's open seat in the Senate. So, what does this mean for the state?

Bureau of Land Management / Flickr

Wyoming Republicans were dealt a setback in their efforts to keep sage grouse off the federal endangered species list.

House Republicans were able to include a provision in this year’s National Defense Authorization Act that would prohibit the federal government from changing the conservation status of sage grouse for the next decade. But the provision was left out of the final bill when House leaders negotiated a final bill with their Senate counterparts. That didn’t sit well with members of the lower chamber.

M&R Glasgow, Flickr Creative Commons

 

In the wake of the tragic slayings in Orlando last weekend, gun-control unexpectedly dominated Congress this week.

For Democrats the slaughter of 49 people at the Orlando LGBT club was the last straw and they’re calling for overhauling the nation’s lax gun laws. On Monday, the House dedicated a moment of silence to the victims, and Connecticut Congressman Jim Himes and a few other Democrats walked out of the chamber.

Leland Christensen

 

State Senator Leland Christensen is among the Republican candidates hoping to replace Congressman Cynthia Lummis in the U.S. House of Representatives. Lummis announced late last year that she would not seek re-election and it led to a surge of interest in her seat. Christensen has an extensive political background as both a Teton County Commissioner and a State Senator.