Naina Rao

Morning Edition Host

Phone: 307-766-2241
Email: nbadarin@uwyo.edu

Naina Rao comes to Wyoming Public Radio from Jakarta, Indonesia. She has worked at NPR for Story Lab and the nationally syndicated show, "1A". Naina graduated from Michigan State University in 2018 with a B.A. in Journalism. Naina enjoys swimming, listening to podcasts and watching Bollywood movies. 

Naina Rao

For people of color and immigrants living in Wyoming, getting a haircut, shopping for groceries, or celebrating holidays can be difficult. Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao has been making trips between Laramie, Wyoming, and Denver, Colorado to get the basic cultural amenities she needs for her lifestyle. She takes us on her journey in this audio postcard.

Camille T. Dungy

The University of Wyoming Libraries hosted award-winning poet and writer, Camille T. Dungy, for a virtual reading of her work on October 24, 2020. Dungy was born in Denver and has written and edited publications that often explore the ties between race and the environment.

Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao spoke with her about how she got started with poetry, her reflections on her journey, and what she thinks about the state of society today.

Shannon Smith

Wyoming will witness history this year as it elects two women to Congress. Newcomer and Northern Arapaho tribal member, Lynnette Greybull, will face incumbent Liz Cheney for the U.S. House seat. Cynthia Lummis will face ecologist and scientist, Merav Ben-David, for Wyoming's open seat in the Senate. So, what does this mean for the state?

Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon

A new Black Studies Center has opened this fall at the University of Wyoming. The center aims on advancing the accurate histories of Black people and history in the state.

Eda Uzunlar/Wyoming Public Media

Thousands have taken to the streets across the country, and right here in Wyoming, to call for an end to unchecked police misconduct. An investigation by Wyoming Public Radio and the Casper Star-Tribune found that in Wyoming law enforcement accountability can be a long, uncharted and demanding process. Naina Rao spoke with reporters Tennessee Watson and Shane Sanderson about what they found.

Scott Lair

St. Patrick's Day is usually a popular day for bars to make money. And that's what Scott Lair, who owns the Great Untamed bar in Laramie, was expecting this year. But it was also around the time COVID-19 started hitting Wyoming.

Aina Farid Shah

When the University of Wyoming announced that it will resume in-person classes and re-open campus in the fall, international student Aina Farid Shah was worried. "At first I was shocked, because, isn't that unsafe?" she said.

Nimi McConigley

Even though women in Wyoming were allowed to vote, run for office and get involved in politics back in 1870, it took much longer after that for women of color to get elected.

The first Black woman to get elected to office in Wyoming was Elizabeth Byrd. She started out in the Wyoming House of Representatives, in 1981. That's close to a century later after women were first granted the right to vote and run for office.

What took so long?

Catherine Wheeler

Listen to the full show here.

Fewer Cars On The Road, Fewer Dollars For Highways: What COVID-19 Means For WYDOT

While many businesses are losing money in the state, so are some Wyoming agencies. One that's getting the hardest hit is the Wyoming Department of Transportation. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler explains.

Bilal Madjour

It's usually around this time that Muslim international students would go home and celebrate Ramadan with their families. Ramadan is a significant holiday for Muslims around the world. It's a month where Muslims fast from dawn until dusk. And it's called the "holy month" because it's a time where people are encouraged to do good deeds, help each other, and have gratitude for their family and friends.

State of Wyoming

Listen to the full show here.

Governor Gordon Favors A Conservative Approach Towards Dealing With The Pandemic

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon says despite calls to reopen businesses he prefers to take a more conservative approach as Wyoming approaches the COVID-19 peak for the state.

Vanessa Hoene


The coronavirus doesn't discriminate and can spread to anyone. Including pregnant mothers like Vanessa Hoene.

Anna Royo


Anna Royo and Maria Oreshkina were playing a tennis match in Denver when they found out that their whole athletic season came crashing to an end.

"Everything was shocking 'cause like, overnight, it was—everything was cancelled," Anna Royo said.

Ling Li

Ling Li was on vacation with her family for winter break, in the province of Hainan, China, when the country confirmed its initial cases of coronavirus.