Naina Rao

Morning Edition Host

Phone: 307-766-2241
Email: nbadarin@uwyo.edu

Naina Rao comes to Wyoming Public Radio from Jakarta, Indonesia. She has worked at NPR for Story Lab and the nationally syndicated show, "1A". Naina graduated from Michigan State University in 2018 with a B.A. in Journalism. Naina enjoys swimming, listening to podcasts and watching Bollywood movies. 

Kamila Kudelska

Listen to the full show here.

"The Spanish School:" Mexican Segregation In Northwest Wyoming

Usually segregation in school is something you heard about in the south. But it turns out Wyoming had segregated schools as well. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska goes back in history and takes a look at one such school in Worland.

Vincent Horiuchi


The pandemic has put uncertainty at the forefront of many people's lives. It's forced many to believe and hope for better days, even if there's no end in sight.

Screenshot / University of Wyoming

The University of Wyoming's Black Studies Center and UW President Ed Seidel held a town hall meeting on February 24 to address the recent racist Zoom-bombing attack that occurred during a live virtual panel on February 15.

Anne Mason

Relative Theatrics is back on schedule with its eighth season. It's just announced a new play called The Care and Feeding of Small Animals, which will be streamed virtually while performed live by its cast.

Ling Li


Lunar New Year begins on February 12, 2021. And usually, the holiday involves huge festivities with fireworks, dancing, and family reunions. But as the pandemic continues into this year, the celebration will look and feel different this new year. Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao reports this story.

Image courtesy of Lifetime Arts

The Wyoming Arts Council has partnered with the Wyoming State Library and Lifetime Arts to train Wyoming-based artists and librarians on 'Creative Aging'.

Nicole Crawford


When an insurrection mob violently pushed through the entrance of the Capitol building on January 6, the American Alliance of Museums issued a statement condemning the violence that occurred. They did so because the Capitol is more than a workplace, it's a living museum.

Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao spoke to University of Wyoming's Art Museum director, Nicole Crawford, on her perspective regarding the aftermath and effects the insurrection has made on art, history, and museums.

Sequencing Through Time and Place

Casper-based nonprofit arts incubator ART 321 is hosting the Wyoming Creative Collectives Exhibit for the first time this month.

Rock Springs Main Street/Urban Renewal Agency

Arts organizations, businesses, and individuals from Rock Springs have formed the Sweetwater Arts Partnership group to combine their efforts to raise awareness and strengthen the arts scene in the local community.

University of Wyoming (UW) College of Law Professor Darrell Jackson, UW Art Museum Director Nicole Crawford and former UW law student have co-written a book chapter focusing on race theory.

Eugene Gagliano

It's safe to say that 2020 has been a very difficult, trying year for a lot of people across the world. Wyoming's Poet Laureate, Eugene Gagliano, agrees. But the pandemic also made him realize a different perspective—how grateful he was to be living in the state of Wyoming.

He shared his perspective by writing a poem, called The Blessing of Wyoming. And it got published in the New York Times. He recited the poem during his conversation with Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao.

http://www.donlonfh.com/

The numbers of cases and deaths related to COVID-19 have dominated most media headlines this year. And funeral homes in Wyoming are included in that story. 

Naina Rao

For people of color and immigrants living in Wyoming, getting a haircut, shopping for groceries, or celebrating holidays can be difficult. Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao has been making trips between Laramie, Wyoming, and Denver, Colorado to get the basic cultural amenities she needs for her lifestyle. She takes us on her journey in this audio postcard.

Camille T. Dungy

The University of Wyoming Libraries hosted award-winning poet and writer, Camille T. Dungy, for a virtual reading of her work on October 24, 2020. Dungy was born in Denver and has written and edited publications that often explore the ties between race and the environment.

Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao spoke with her about how she got started with poetry, her reflections on her journey, and what she thinks about the state of society today.

Shannon Smith

Wyoming will witness history this year as it elects two women to Congress. Newcomer and Northern Arapaho tribal member, Lynnette Greybull, will face incumbent Liz Cheney for the U.S. House seat. Cynthia Lummis will face ecologist and scientist, Merav Ben-David, for Wyoming's open seat in the Senate. So, what does this mean for the state?

Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon

A new Black Studies Center has opened this fall at the University of Wyoming. The center aims on advancing the accurate histories of Black people and history in the state.

Eda Uzunlar/Wyoming Public Media

Thousands have taken to the streets across the country, and right here in Wyoming, to call for an end to unchecked police misconduct. An investigation by Wyoming Public Radio and the Casper Star-Tribune found that in Wyoming law enforcement accountability can be a long, uncharted and demanding process. Naina Rao spoke with reporters Tennessee Watson and Shane Sanderson about what they found.

Scott Lair

St. Patrick's Day is usually a popular day for bars to make money. And that's what Scott Lair, who owns the Great Untamed bar in Laramie, was expecting this year. But it was also around the time COVID-19 started hitting Wyoming.

Aina Farid Shah

When the University of Wyoming announced that it will resume in-person classes and re-open campus in the fall, international student Aina Farid Shah was worried. "At first I was shocked, because, isn't that unsafe?" she said.

Nimi McConigley

Even though women in Wyoming were allowed to vote, run for office and get involved in politics back in 1870, it took much longer after that for women of color to get elected.

The first Black woman to get elected to office in Wyoming was Elizabeth Byrd. She started out in the Wyoming House of Representatives, in 1981. That's close to a century later after women were first granted the right to vote and run for office.

What took so long?

Catherine Wheeler

Listen to the full show here.

Fewer Cars On The Road, Fewer Dollars For Highways: What COVID-19 Means For WYDOT

While many businesses are losing money in the state, so are some Wyoming agencies. One that's getting the hardest hit is the Wyoming Department of Transportation. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler explains.

Bilal Madjour

It's usually around this time that Muslim international students would go home and celebrate Ramadan with their families. Ramadan is a significant holiday for Muslims around the world. It's a month where Muslims fast from dawn until dusk. And it's called the "holy month" because it's a time where people are encouraged to do good deeds, help each other, and have gratitude for their family and friends.

State of Wyoming

Listen to the full show here.

Governor Gordon Favors A Conservative Approach Towards Dealing With The Pandemic

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon says despite calls to reopen businesses he prefers to take a more conservative approach as Wyoming approaches the COVID-19 peak for the state.

Vanessa Hoene


The coronavirus doesn't discriminate and can spread to anyone. Including pregnant mothers like Vanessa Hoene.

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