wildlife


Originally from California, author Leslie Patten fell in love with Wyoming almost fifteen years ago and eventually made it her permanent home. The naturalist moved to a rustic cabin near Cody and became fascinated with the wildlife she saw right outside her door. Leslie Patten discusses writing, dogs, mountain lions, and moving from the most populated state to the least.

Her latest book Koda and the Wolves: Tales of a Red Dog is out now.

Lisa Barrett

University of Wyoming researchers examined how elephants use water as a tool in a new study.

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park is asking for the public's help in addressing its non-native mountain goat problem. The park announced Thursday, August 6, it is now accepting applications from qualified volunteers for a culling program. Culling is set to begin mid-September and wrap up by the middle of November.

Neal Herbert / NPS

In 2019, there wasn't a single human injury caused by a grizzly bear throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. But the number of injuries has already reached eight in 2020 - a new record for the first half of the year, as the Jackson Hole News&Guide reported last week.

Alan Wilson

Polar bears have been endangered for years, but a new study finds that without a decrease in greenhouse gas emission, almost all polar bears will die by 2100.

USDA photo by Scott Bauer

The Wyoming Game and Fish commission approved a Wyoming Chronic Wasting Disease Management Plan with no revisions. Some environmental groups, though, are worried that the plan doesn't address elk feedgrounds.

Heather Ray

Ken Keffer grew up exploring the outdoors around his childhood home in Buffalo. The Wyomingite eventually turned his passion for nature into a career as an educator and author. Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery spoke to him about his new book, Earth Almanac, birding, and his fondness for a unique creature.

UW BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE

The BioBlitz asks people in Wyoming to take pictures of wildlife and plants so that scientists can get a snapshot of the ecosystem in the state. 

USGS Photo - Frank VanManen

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled to uphold a federal judge’s 2018 decision to keep Yellowstone grizzly bears under Endangered Species Act protections. 

Wyoming toad
Sara Armstrong / USFWS Mountain-Prairie

Imperiled species - species that are threatened or endangered - are seeing population declines that are much faster than they were 100 years ago, according to a recent study by researchers at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Stanford University, and the Missouri Botanical Garden. While Wyoming is home to a relatively low number of imperiled vertebrate species, scientists warn that's no reason to be lax.

William F. Wood

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will decide whether wolverines should be listed as threatened by the end of August. 

This deadline comes after a long wait, said Andrea Zaccardi, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. 

Tyler Quiring / Unsplash

As humans around the world have limited their movement during the coronavirus pandemic, some animals appear to be changing their behavior. Biologist Christian Rutz may have seen one small example for himself.

"We're just trying to always figure out a way to call attention to these amazing places and this amazing country where we live and the incredible wildlife that surrounds us." David Rohm

This interview with David Rohm discusses their work at Wild Excellence Films. Wild Excellence Films was awarded a Spark grant from Wyoming Humanities for their documentary Golden Eagles: Witnesses to a Changing West, and focused on Native American cultural and spiritual significance and relationship to the golden eagle—that will educate the public about golden eagles and a biologically diverse and threatened region. The film is expected to air on Wyoming PBS in 2023, and a screening is planned at the Center of the West in Cody in early fall of 2022.  For more information go to ThinkWY.org.

BLM Wyoming Photo by Mark Thonhoff via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Tracking wildlife in Wyoming is no easy task, but the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is working to create comprehensive datasets on the state's animal populations.

Greg Nickerson, Wyoming Migration Initiative

A new study by the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Wyoming found mule deer migration is negatively impacted by global warming induced droughts.

Tom Koerner/USFWS

Researchers from Western Ecosystems Technology and the University of Wyoming have found how much land development a deer can actually handle in a recent study.

Land Report Editors

Sublette County ranchers say a lawsuit challenging a U.S. Forest Service grazing permit could run them out of business along with additional negative consequences.

Tom Mangelsen

Typically, grizzly bears give birth to single or twin cubs. But Grizzly 399 is not a typical bear. She's given birth to multiple sets of triplets. And this spring, the Yellowstone region's most famous bear showed up in Grand Teton National Park with four cubs by her side.

Brandi Forgey

Part of a rancher's daily life is dealing with threats to their livestock. And one of the almost impossible threats to try and solve is depredation - especially if the culprit is a protected species, like the golden eagle.

CC0 Public Domain

Yellowstone grizzly bears are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) but starting Tuesday, May 5, a federal court will begin hearing oral arguments on whether the bears should be taken off.

Diana Miller

Yellowstone cutthroat trout are starting to show signs of recovery after nearly 30 years of efforts to eliminate the invasive lake trout threatening their population. 

Sheridan Community Land Trust

The Sheridan Community Land Trust (SCLT) has been granted $235,000 to secure two voluntary conservation easements in Sheridan County.

The two easements will help the organization maintain not only the land and water resources but also habitat for animals like greater sage grouse, mule deer and several species of migratory birds.

Parks Canada

Environmental groups have officially sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for allowing up to 72 grizzly bears to be killed over ten years. The groups filed an intent to sue earlier this year.

National Park Service

Researchers recently discovered that plague is much more prevalent in the Grand Teton area than previously thought. 

By USFWS Mountain-Prairie (Mule Deer on Winter Range in SW Wyoming) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0) or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The last of five installments of funding totaling almost $2.5 million was approved by the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission recently. The $560,000 has been distributed over the past five years to support the Statewide Mule Deer Initiative.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department

Approximately 75 pronghorn have died in a 35 square mile area north of Gillette this year. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department has identified the cause: a bacteria called Mycoplasma bovis, which is usually found in cattle and has not been known to affect pronghorn.

Jim Peaco / NPS

New federal guidelines say it's OK to haze a grizzly bear-even with a paintball gun.

In today’s partisan political climate, one thing most Westerners seem to agree on is the need to protect wildlife corridors.

Wildlife corridors are historic wildlife migration routes. And sometimes, those routes need protecting. It could be as simple as restoring some native species, or it could involve building a grassy overpass over a busy highway.

Tufts University

Federal lands are much better at reducing habitat loss and protecting endangered species than private lands, according to a new study out this week by researchers at Tufts University and the conservation group Defenders of Wildlife.

Mike Lockhart

Wyoming is one of the most important golden eagle habitats in North America. But the iconic raptors are facing a potential population decline due to conventional and renewable energy development and other human-caused threats.

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