wildlife

Park County landowners, residents, NGO organizations, and local government have united to tackle wildlife-friendly fencing in the area. This is the first of its kind in the state.

US Fish & Wildlife Service

The Wyoming Pocket Gopher is extremely hard to study, but scientists at the University of Wyoming have found one way to make it easier.

Ben Kraushaar


In 2018, a Wyoming research scientist ran 92 miles in just three days. His goal? Highlight the challenges of the seasonal migration for mule deer; a well-known species in Wyoming, but also one that's been in decline. A movie called 92 Miles is set to come out in the next few months about his journey. Wyoming Public Radio's Cooper McKim spoke with Wyoming Migration Initiative research scientist and runner Pat Rodgers on the importance of his trek.

Public Domain

In 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) proposed to list the wolverine in the lower 48 states as endangered.

Kamila Kudelska

Early one morning, eight volunteers surrounded a table with a 400 pound grizzly bear carcass in its center. Draper Natural History Museum Assistant curator Corey Anco said they are defleshing the animal.

"They are removing all of the meat around the bones, all the meat around the ribs, all the meat around the vertebrae," said Anco. "And they're trying to get this as clean as we can reasonably so."

Joe Riis

An elk has tested positive for chronic wasting disease in Grand Teton National Park.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a neurological disease that is deadly to deer, elk and moose. It has been identified in moose and deer in northwest Wyoming but this is the first elk in the area to have it.

USFWS

This week, the northern spotted owl and the monarch butterfly were denied protections under the Endangered Species Act, even though both animals qualify.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is putting together a new taskforce to tackle wildlife issues that are important to the public.

Asiir via CC-BY-SA-2.5

For years, a wide variety of stakeholders have been working to come up with how to better manage prairie dogs in the Thunder Basin National Grassland. On Tuesday, Dec. 1, the U.S. Forest Service announced its final decision for its management plan amendment.

TOM MANGELSEN

Grizzly 399 is arguably one of the most famous grizzly bears in the U.S. due to the amount of attention she has gotten over the years. This year is no different.

She and her four cubs have been spotted outside of Grand Teton National Park, and Jackson residents started worrying she could be in danger.

AMEEN AL-GHETTA/USFWS

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is starting the process to rework its elk feedground management plan. The first step is a public comment period.

For the past couple of years, Game and Fish has grappled with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), a neurological disease that is deadly to deer, elk and moose. A public process looking at CWD management resulted with the need to examine the management of the 22 elk feedgrounds in northwest Wyoming. 

Diego Delso

Researchers at the University of Wyoming are studying how moose cool themselves down.

UW researcher Tana Verzuh said the moose population in the Snowy Range is declining and that rising temperatures may be a cause.

Doug Smith

Trumpeter Swans were first documented in Yellowstone National Park in the early 1900s, and they were common until the 1960s when their population started to decline. By 2010, there were only about 60 swans in the park. The loss of these birds has brought together more than seven different federal, state, and private agencies in the quest to bring them back to their former numbers.

USGS

Back in 2018, the U.S. Geological Survey and several Western states formed the Corridor Mapping Team, a first-of-its-kind collaboration among state and federal wildlife biologists to map ungulate migrations.

Last week, the team published its first volume of maps, which document more than 40 big-game migration routes in Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming.

Panthera

For the past 17 years, researchers have been tracking mountain lions, also called pumas, north of Jackson Hole. When they started the research, the population was around 20 to 25 adults, but now it's down to about 10 adults. 

Michael Dillon

Climate change is forcing insects to move to higher elevations.

Joe Ravi, via Wikimedia Commons, license CC-BY-SA 3.0

The United States Forest Service (USFS) is set to release an amendment to the Thunder Basin National Grassland management plan. There are five proposed alternatives to amend black-tailed prairie dog management on the grassland-a highly controversial subject for local landowners and wildlife advocates.

The accepted amendment will change a previous amendment from 2015.

Dulcinea Groff

A researcher at the University of Wyoming studied the history of seabirds in the Falkland Islands, off the tip of Argentina. The goal was to learn how climate change affected the ecosystem in the past.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed protections Thursday for the gray wolf under the Endangered Species Act in the lower 48 states.


NPS / J. Mills

Scientists at the University of Wyoming are studying how moose respond to bark beetles killing their forest habitats.

Chuck Bartlebaugh

A new study finds that bear spray is still effective in wind and cold.

The study, led by Brigham Young University, tested bear spray range for different conditions that might occur in harsh climates.

For many communities in the West, the water that flows out of kitchen faucets and bathroom showerheads starts high up in the mountains, as snowpack tucked under canopies of spruce and pine trees.

This summer’s record-breaking wildfires have reduced some of those headwater forests to burnt trees and heaps of ash. In high alpine ecosystems, climate change has tipped the scales toward drier forests, lessened snowpack, hotter summers and extended fire seasons.

William F. Wood via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

Environmental groups have issued an intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if the agency does not put the proposal to put wolverines under Endangered Species Act protections back on the table.

Savannah Maher

 

This fall, the White Buffalo Program took a group of young tribal members to the Big Horn Mountains on the Crow reservation for a buffalo hunt.

Mark Elbroch

Mountain lions are one of the great conservation success stories. Hunting once whittled their numbers down to a few thousand. But when they were re-classified as a game instead of vermin, they made a big comeback. But it's also led to more conflicts with humans.

A new book called the Cougar Conundrum: Sharing the World with a Successful Predator offers ideas for how to live with these big predators and how to better manage them. Wyoming Public Radio's Melodie Edwards chatted with author Mark Elbroch, the Director of Panthera's Puma project.

Jonathan Othén, via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced Thursday, October 8, that wolverines in the lower 48 are healthy and will not be put on the threatened species list under the Endangered Species Act.

Valentin Panzirsch

University of Wyoming researchers have created a computer model that can identify animals in images taken by camera traps.

Bob Wick, BLM

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon was in the nation's capital this week testifying about his desire to overhaul the Endangered Species Act. Correspondent Matt Laslo has the story on his testimony calling to upend that act - a message he delivered before Wyoming Senator John Barrasso's Environment and Public Works Committee.

Jean Beaufort / CC0

"It all began with an incident that we had two years ago where we had an outfitter and his client that were involved in a grizzly attack," recalled Teton County Sheriff Matt Carr. His office was notified by the client who had fled the scene.

Large numbers of migratory birds have reportedly dropped dead in New Mexico and Colorado.

There’s still confusion over the deaths, like how many died and what exactly killed them. However, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service believes the bird deaths in Colorado and New Mexico were caused by an unusual cold front.


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