Maggie Mullen

Reporter, MOUNTAIN WEST NEWS BUREAU

Phone: 307-766-5086
Email: mmullen5@uwyo.edu

Maggie Mullen reports for the Mountain West News Bureau out of Wyoming Public Radio. She is a fifth generation Wyomingite, born and raised in Casper. Before coming to Wyoming Public Radio, she was a Master’s student in American Studies at the University of Wyoming, where she also earned a BA in English and French. Her work has been featured onMarketplace, Science Friday, Here and Now, Morning Edition, and All Things Considered. She was awarded a 2019 regional Edward R. Murrow Award for her story on the Black 14. Maggie enjoys cooking for friends and family, swimming in rivers and lakes, and spending time with her rescue dog, Moonee.

Ways to Connect

NIH

Allergy season is here. For many of us, that means lots of sneezing and itchy eyes. So how can you tell the difference between seasonal allergies and something more serious, like COVID-19?

cBill Oxford / Unsplash

As shelter-in-place and stay-at-home orders get extended further into the year, some local governments across the Mountain West are threatening jail to enforce those orders. But groups like the American Civil Liberties Union say that's the wrong approach.

Maggie Mullen


It's the Monday after spring break, a day when students and professors would usually be returning to campus. But that traditional springtime bustle is nowhere to be seen here at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

Maggie Mullen

Last weekend, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) sold 153 nonresident fishing licenses, about the same number it sold during the same period of time last year.

University of Wyoming's Pokes Make The Difference Campaign page

University of Wyoming students facing financial hardship due to impacts from the coronavirus can now apply for aid through an emergency fund. The Pokes Make a Difference campaign is collecting donations from the public in order to help students with housing, food, and technology access.

EPW GOP

Most states have issued stay-at-home orders to slow the spread of COVID-19. Wyoming and Utah are two of the very few remaining without statewide orders.

UntestedMontana.com

With COVID-19 tests still in short supply, a Montana computer programmer created websites intended to tally the number of people in Montana and Wyoming who self-report symptoms of the disease and haven't been able to get tested.

Ken Lund via CC BY-SA 2.0

In an unexpected move, Gov. Mark Gordon vetoed a bill that would have laid the groundwork for a major land and mineral rights deal between Wyoming and Occidental Petroleum.

https://www.westernaf.net/

The coronavirus pandemic has put an indefinite hold on live events, and musicians are among those losing out. So performers are turning to the internet as a virtual concert venue.

Charlize Branch

Ethel Branch is the former attorney general of the Navajo Nation. A few weeks ago, when she went grocery shopping in Flagstaff, Arizona, she noticed that the shelves were already pretty bare. That worried her. For shoppers from the nearby Navajo Nation, a grocery store can be hours away.

https://health.wyo.gov/

A Green River man in his 40s tested positive for COVID-19 - he is currently self-isolating at home. 

Jim Peaco / NPS

New federal guidelines say it's OK to haze a grizzly bear-even with a paintball gun.

public domain

In an announcement made Thursday afternoon, Acting University of Wyoming President Neil Theobald said spring break would be extended to two weeks, with students returning on March 30. And while the university is holding off on moving classes completely online, the extended break is meant to give faculty time to prepare for distance learning in case it becomes necessary.

Ted Brummond, University of Wyoming Photo Service

Two major actions ​regarding sports ​activities across Wyoming came on Thursday because of concerns over COVID-19. 

Tufts University

Federal lands are much better at reducing habitat loss and protecting endangered species than private lands, according to a new study out this week by researchers at Tufts University and the conservation group Defenders of Wildlife.

BLM photo by Bob Wick

Wyoming's Red Desert is the largest unfenced swath of land in the continental U.S. Exploring it can be daunting, since there's little signage or information online. The Wyoming Outdoor Council is hoping to change that with a new map of the landscape.

Sunday Vinyl

The Mountain West is very well represented in this year's James Beard Awards, the semifinalists for which were announced last week.

InciWeb

The U.S. Forest Service is rethinking how it employs firefighters.

Wyoming Women's Foundation

The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Wyoming 2020 recently came out. It's a study that takes into account all kinds of factors for working families, including how many adults are in your household, the number of children, or which county you live in. And then it works like a calculator to determine the amount of income required to meet basic needs at a minimally adequate level.

Washington State Department of Agriculture

It's not uncommon for livestock to get certain strains of coronavirus. But the strains that affect cattle and other farm animals are not the ones raising fears of a global pandemic.

Bureau of Land Management

Ten years ago, when Colorado College first conducted the Conservation in the West Poll, 48 percent of respondents said yes, climate change is a problem requiring action. This year, that number is up to 59 percent.

Old Main by thecoldmidwest is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The University of Wyoming's Board of Trustees released the names of the three finalists for the president position. It includes Gregory W. Bowman, dean of West Virginia University College of Law; Edward Seidel, vice president for economic development and innovation for the University of Illinois System; and Daniel M. White, chancellor of the University of Alaska-Fairbanks.

Public Domain

The number of skiers led by ski guides out of bounds and into the backcountry at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort may double next season.

Utah Avalanche Center

Highways and some ski resorts in our region have had to close in recent days due to high avalanche danger.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr


April Poley is a broker and real estate agent in Gillette, Wyoming. Lately she's been getting a lot of her potential clients through a business called Conservative Move.

NPS Photo / Stacey Skirvanek

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service faces a pending lawsuit from conservation groups who argue the agency has taken too long to protect wolverines under the Endangered Species Act.

Diane Renkin / NPS

The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission is calling on the National Park Service to cancel its plans to use aerial gunning to remove invasive mountain goats from Grand Teton National Park.

On Wednesday, the commission passed a resolution condemning the plan, writing, "Having government personnel kill mountain goats from helicopters and leaving them to rot and be wasted is unacceptable."

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