native americans

Aaron Schrank

Jane Juve makes her morning rounds through the same building where she served as Riverton’s city attorney two decades ago. Now she’s the Riverton Police Department’s new ‘community relations ombudsman.’

“If you feel like your civil rights have been violated, you’re more than welcome to come to my office in city hall,” Juve says.

South Dakota Historical Society Press

  

One of the most controversial figures in the history of the American West is Ogalala chief Red Cloud. To some a brilliant warrior and politician, to others, to blame for the Ogalala’s loss of the Black Hills. Now, there’s a new biography called Red Cloud: Ogalala Legend.

Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards talked with research historian John McDermott about how the Ogalala ended up in Wyoming, and why giving up these lands meant the end of their way of life.

Lander Art Center

Friday, November 6, the third annual Native American Art Show opens in Lander. This year, the exhibit is breaking new ground by featuring the works of contemporary performance artists alongside traditional art.

At the opening, performance artists will showcase spoken word, hip hop, music, and poetry at the Middle Fork restaurant in downtown Lander.

At the Lander Art Center gallery, artists will collaborate on a painting.

The Modern West 3: Riding For Glory At Cheyenne Frontier Days

Aug 17, 2015
Bob Beck

Take a trip to the great Western extravaganza: Cheyenne Frontier Days. Meet bullfighters and carnival barkers, rodeo queens and pow wow dancers, and discover where history and legend meet.

Aaron Schrank

In most schools, campaigns to keep students from smoking use simple slogans like “Be Smart, Don’t Start,” but those targeting Native American kids are a bit different. On Wyoming’s Wind River Indian Reservation, you’re likely to hear more nuanced catchphrases like “Keep It Sacred,” and “Traditional Use, Not Commercial Abuse.”

That’s because tobacco is an indispensable part of many Native American traditions. But with sky-high smoking rates on reservations, Wyoming Public Radio’s Aaron Schrank reports that the need to limit nontraditional tobacco use is greater than ever. 

Dawn Ballou

Thanks to the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, Native American tribes now have more legal tools than ever before. That’s according to a speaker at a conference on Monday hosted by the University of Wyoming American Indian Studies Program.

Lenz Collection, Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library Wyoming Room

The Sheridan WYO Rodeo in will host the return of some special guests this year. The Miss Indian America pageant was held during the rodeo from 1953 until 1984 and several past winners will reunite this weekend.

ARCHIVAL TAPE: [Drumming] There’s a town out west where the eye can stretch over the plains from mesa to mountains, where the heart warms in the sunshine of friends and the townspeople can see buffalo from their own backyards. Such a place is Sheridan Wyoming!  

A State Representative who represents the Wind River Reservation says it’s essential that Native Americans hold office and articulate their points of view to the rest of the state.  That’s why Representative Patrick Goggles has been working to get more young people interested in politics. 

“We are in that process of encouraging many young folks to endeavor into the arena of politics.  Our motto is that if you don’t articulate the politics of your community, someone will for you.”

Native Americans say they want the ability to compete for money and jobs generated by Internet gambling if Congress legalizes it. But they don't want to lose their sovereignty to get it.

The Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing Thursday about tribes' concerns over Internet gambling, which has been banned in the U.S. since 2006. Many people have been playing at offshore sites anyway.