CWD

Colorado's poised to put the question of wolf reintroduction on the November ballot. One unanswered question is how the predators might affect the spread of chronic wasting disease, if at all.

CWD is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that currently infects deer, elk, moose and reindeer. Critics of wolf reintroduction argue that more predators on the landscape could further spread CWD.

Statewide Chronic Wasting Disease Distribution (All Species)
Wyoming Game and Fish Department

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department has released a draft of its Chronic Wasting Disease management plan.

A working group of 31 Wyoming residents released a report with their recommendations on how to manage Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the state.

Chronic wasting disease is continuing to pop up in deer and elk populations around the Mountain West. But researchers have found one way to help prevent hunters from further spreading the neurodegenerative disease: household bleach.

wgfd.wyo.gov

As hunting season begins, Wyoming Game and Fish (WGF) officials encourage hunters to have their animals tested for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). CWD is a deadly brain disease that effects deer, elk and moose. It's almost impossible to spot, and spreads easily between animals. The Centers for Disease Control recommends against eating meat from an infected animal.

Chronic Wasting Disease is a wildlife illness similar to Mad Cow Disease.  It’s rooted itself in the Mountain West and is thinning herds throughout the region.

Nevada and Idaho are the only states in our region with no confirmed cases of the highly contagious and fatal wildlife infection. But that doesn’t mean it hasn’t made it there.

Public Domain

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department will host trainings throughout the Bighorn Basin to teach hunters how to collect samples from mule deer for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing.

A neurodegenerative illness called chronic wasting disease is spreading among deer and elk in our region. Now, researchers at Colorado State University say they’ve found a new way to study the disease -- and another indication that it might eventually become capable of sickening people.

Chronic wasting disease is crippling deer populations in the Mountain West, around the country and in bordering Canadian provinces. It's not a bacterium or a virus or even a fungus, but caused by something called a prion, a type of protein that all mammals have in their bodies.

Ameen Al-Ghetta/USFWS

Earlier this week, a conservation coalition filed a lawsuit against the National Elk Refuge in Jackson for continuing to provide supplemental feed to elk in the winter, especially since Chronic Wasting Disease has been detected in Teton County.

Kamila Kudelska

On a snowy and foggy morning in Jackson Hole, Brian Glaspell, manager of the National Elk Refuge, walked toward a green trash can.

Statewide Chronic Wasting Disease Distribution in Wyoming
Wyoming Game and Fish Department

A case of chronic wasting disease, or CWD, was found in a deer outside Meeteetse. The white-tailed buck was legally harvested by a hunter southwest of the town, and was later sampled by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Testing confirmed the buck positive for CWD.

Tom Koerner/USFWS / Flickr

A new case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) was found in a harvested mule deer buck 12 miles outside of Dubois this week. It was found in hunting area 128 and neighbors area 171 where CWD had been found earlier this year. According to Wyoming Game and Fish Wildlife supervisor in Lander, Jason Hunter, it’s not surprising that the disease has spread. 

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

New research had found that the fatal brain illness, chronic wasting disease (CWD), has a direct impact on the population decline of white-tailed deer. University of Wyoming graduate student David Edmunds worked on the study and said the research shows the disease lowers the survival rate of female deer under the age of seven. As of right now, there is no way to manage the disease once introduced into a population of deer.