armed school staff

Instructor Graham Dunne is holding up some printouts with faces on them. He tells his students they're smaller than real heads.

"Here's some useless knowledge from being a sniper," he says. "The average human head is 6 inches across by 10 inches high. These are probably half that."

We're at the Flatrock Regional Training Center in Commerce City, Colorado. Usually the people training here are law enforcement, but today they're teachers, principals, bus drivers, coaches and school administrators — 13 of them.

As kids across the country head back to school for the year, the question of how to keep students safe is constant and ever-evolving, especially when it comes to mass shootings. One recent active shooter training at Pinnacle Charter School in northern Colorado focused on three actions: evacuate, barricade, and fight.

Standing on blue gym mats, under bright fluorescent lights, a trainer and a student lean in, heads close.

Campbell County School District

The Campbell County School Board has decided to move forward in its discussion of arming district staff.

The school board decided at Tuesday's meeting that they want to continue discussions on a potential policy but no final decisions have been made.

Campbell County School District

The Campbell County School District is continuing to discuss a policy that would allow district staff to carry concealed firearms.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office/Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International

The Fremont County District 1 School Board voted 4-2 on July 23 to allow approved staff members to conceal carry firearms in schools, making Lander the fourth district in Wyoming to approve such a policy.

Data from Campbell County School District

The Campbell County School District Board of Trustees is continuing the discussion on whether to allow teachers to carry firearms after reviewing the results of a community-wide survey.

Tennessee Watson / Wyoming Public Radio

On the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High school shooting, students at Laramie High School joined young people across the country who walked out to make their voices heard on gun reform.  

Katie Kvenild was the first student in her 9th grade biology to stand up and head towards the door for the 10 am walk out. She said despite her strong commitment to her beliefs, she was still nervous.