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Second season of "Native America" showcases Indigenous impact in modern America

The final episode of the second season of "Native America" aired in late November. The season celebrates and showcases the impacts that Native Americans have on modern American life.
Image courtesy of PBS
The final episode of the second season of Native America aired in mid-November. The season celebrates and showcases the impacts that Native Americans have on modern American life.

This week, the PBS series Native America aired the last episode of its second season. The show highlights the ways that Native people are shaping modern American society through science, sports, culture and other fields.

Native Public Media, a network of tribal public radio and television stations, helped to promote the second season. They also completed some polling about the series. CEO Loris Taylor says these polls show the reaction in Colorado and Alaska has been extremely positive.

“I think if you look at the ecosystem that we have, there's a lot to share and Native Americans are just beginning to flex their storytelling arm," said Taylor. "It’s really wonderful to see.”

Shows like Native America and Reservation Dogs have centered the stories and production talents of Indigenous people. Taylor believes that changes their portrayal in popular culture.

“I always felt that taking control of our narrative would empower Native Americans by allowing us to assert our own agency over stories,” she said. “And I feel like that's happening today.”

One thing she wants viewers to take away: Native Americans are not a monolith.

“We have over 574 sovereign nations in this country, and they're incredibly diverse,” Taylor said. “They have their own history, culture and, and challenges, their own language and their own stories.”

“There's been a good reception across Americans in general. So I'm hoping that it results in season three. We would love to continue telling our stories on PBS,” she said.

You can read more about the program on PBS’ website.

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