Megan Feighery

Part-Time News Reporter And Cultural Affairs Producer

Email: mfeigher@uwyo.edu

Megan Feighery is a Southern California native with both a B.A. in English Literature and an M.A. in American Studies from Cal State Fullerton. She has backpacked solo all over the world and taught English abroad for five years in both the Republic of Georgia and Japan.

You’ll most likely find her searching for the best hot chocolate in town while reading a mystery novel, cooing over every cat she sees, or hiking/kayaking. Megan is excited to be in Laramie this summer working on the HumaNature podcast. 

In the fall of 2019, Megan was promoted to a part-time paid position.


Originally from California, author Leslie Patten fell in love with Wyoming almost fifteen years ago and eventually made it her permanent home. The naturalist moved to a rustic cabin near Cody and became fascinated with the wildlife she saw right outside her door. Leslie Patten discusses writing, dogs, mountain lions, and moving from the most populated state to the least.

Her latest book Koda and the Wolves: Tales of a Red Dog is out now.

Heather Ray

Ken Keffer grew up exploring the outdoors around his childhood home in Buffalo. The Wyomingite eventually turned his passion for nature into a career as an educator and author. Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery spoke to him about his new book, Earth Almanac, birding, and his fondness for a unique creature.

West Edge Collective

Downtown Cheyenne will host the fifth annual Paint Slingers street festival on July 18 and 19. Attendees are invited to celebrate urban art culture and watch regional artists in action. Desiree Brothe is one of the event organizers and said there’s something for everyone.

Wyoming Art Drop


Last year was the launch of the Wyoming Art Drop, a curated box of six unique pieces from local artists that can be shipped nationwide. Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery spoke to creator Lori Hunter about tourism, upcycling and the unique pressures facing Wyoming artists. She says the first obstacle is location.

Caldera Productions

Two documentaries from Caldera Productions, a film company out of Lander, are up for three regional Emmy Awards this year. The Heartland Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) nominated "The State of Equality" for best historical documentary and best musical composition and arrangement, and "Ferret Town" for best feature among environmental subjects.

Juntos

Ana Castro was born in Mexico City and crossed the border with her mother as a child using a coyote- a person who smuggles immigrants across the U.S. border for a fee.

Public Domain

Wyoming's unemployment rate more than doubled in a just month, increasing from 3.8 percent in March to 9.2 percent in April. The largest job losses were seen in the leisure and hospitality industry, with Teton County being hit the hardest at 18.3 percent due to their dependency on tourism.

Mussi Katz via Flickr.com

Summer is almost here and for those living with domestic violence, this could be a reason to worry. Studies suggest that as the weather gets warmer, domestic violence rates tend to increase.

Catherine Wheeler

Listen to the full show here.

Fewer Cars On The Road, Fewer Dollars For Highways: What COVID-19 Means For WYDOT

While many businesses are losing money in the state, so are some Wyoming agencies. One that's getting the hardest hit is the Wyoming Department of Transportation. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler explains.

Angus Thuermer


Being gay in Wyoming can be challenging, but LGBTQ activist, and performing artist, Andrew Munz has decided to stay and try to make things better. Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery spoke to Munz about art, activism, and growing up in the cowboy state.

freestocks.org via Public Domain

Domestic violence and sexual assault advocacy groups are still providing services around the state, but they've had to adjust how individuals can get help. Many victims have been stuck inside the house with their abuser, unable to find the privacy to reach out to friends, family, or crisis hotlines. 

Downtown Laramie, Wyoming
Bob Beck

Listen to the full show here.

Local Government Fears Loss Of Tax Revenue

This is a tough financial time for a lot of Wyomingites. But impacts on the general public also impact funding for local governments, which directly impacts a wide variety of services from law enforcement to streets.

Chris Clogg, Public Domain


For many of us, being asked to stay home during the pandemic is inconvenient. For others, it is down right dangerous. Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery spoke with Sydney Allred, executive director of the Fremont County Alliance Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, who says social distancing is putting those already living with domestic violence at greater risk.

Listen to the full show here. 

Reported COVID-19 Numbers Are The Floor, Not The Ceiling

Wyoming is one of the states with the fewest number of COVID-19 lab confirmed cases. That's good news. But officials say the state still needs to be careful and not fall into a false sense of security that could cause a second wave and end up being disastrous to the health and economy of the state. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska reports.

Liz Putnam

Susie Pouliot recently got engaged and she and her fiancé wanted to have the ceremony as soon as possible. That's because her dad is terminally ill.

"So our thought was all about, 'what can we do in this shorter time frame to include my dad,' knowing that when we have our actual wedding he likely will not be able to be there" she said.

wyomingworkforce.org

The Wyoming Department of Workforces Services reports that workers have received more than $42 million in unemployment insurance benefits since the pandemic began in the state.

Alan Levine, Public Domain

The Wyoming Department of Workforce Services state's unemployment numbers have remained unchanged at 3.7 percent between February and March of this year. However, those numbers are expected to rise.

Grand Teton via Flikr.com

With widespread layoffs and public closures still in effect until April 30, many Wyoming artists are finding it difficult to support themselves. Michael Lange, Executive director for the Wyoming Arts Council, said he knew he had to find a way to offer support.

State of Wyoming

Listen to the full show here.

Governor Gordon Favors A Conservative Approach Towards Dealing With The Pandemic

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon says despite calls to reopen businesses he prefers to take a more conservative approach as Wyoming approaches the COVID-19 peak for the state.

Anne Mason

Last month, musician John Sidle set up a video camera in his home to perform live on YouTube at the Jackson Hole Hootenanny. The Hootenanny, or The Hoot, is an acoustic musical showcase performed every Monday night at Dornan's, a local bar and restaurant just outside the entrance to Grand Teton National Park. And except for extreme weather it's never been canceled. Then the pandemic happened.

Jason Hammock

A new virtual gallery has made it possible for those self-distancing to still enjoy the arts. It Takes A Village is the brainchild of Cheyenne-based artist Bria Hammock and is Wyoming's first quarantine-friendly art gallery. 

Victor Llorante

Playwright Will Arbery is among ten winners of this years Whiting Award. The prestigious award is the largest literary award in the U.S and recognizes ten emerging writers each year. Arbery was the only playwright to win this year and finds the entire experience both surreal and uplifting.

Bethann Garramon Merkle

Her Flag is a nationwide project celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gave some U.S. women the right to vote. Bethann Garramon Merkle is a research scientist at the University of Wyoming and one of the women chosen to participate in the Her Flag project.

Mike Lockhart

Wyoming is one of the most important golden eagle habitats in North America. But the iconic raptors are facing a potential population decline due to conventional and renewable energy development and other human-caused threats.

Cristy Anspach

A Pinedale artist has a new show on display that was inspired by…roadkill. Cristy Anspach has spent the last two and a half years making ceramic jars to honor each animal killed on her route between Boulder and Pinedale. Over the course of eight months she made 110 jars. The show, titled "Unintended Consequences" will be on display at the Mystery Print Gallery until March 1.

Anspach talked to Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery about finding beauty in death and how every creature deserves respect.

Kristina Hufford

A new study published by researchers at the University of Wyoming could make mine cleanups less ecologically impactful. The scientists tested something called geomorphic reclamation at two abandoned mine sites in Freemont County and just outside of Rock Springs, and compared the findings with traditional practices.

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