Coronavirus In Wyoming: Resources & News

Wyoming Public Media is here to keep you current on the news surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. 

Updated 9/17/20 at 3:30 p.m.

Three more Wyoming residents have died after testing positive for COVID-19. The state Department of Health reported Thursday that three older men from Goshen, Natrona and Park counties died in the last week. There have now been 49 confirmed coronavirus-related deaths in Wyoming.

There are a total of 4,652 confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 in the state with 652 active cases. On Thursday, the Wyoming Department of Health reported 86 new cases. Albany County saw the largest increase, with 16 new cases.

Here are the numbers of lab-confirmed cases broken down by county: Fremont County 574; Laramie 480; Teton 454; Natrona 347; Sweetwater 302; Uinta 266; Albany 257; Campbell 197; Park 184; Carbon 179; Sheridan 162; Washakie 104; Lincoln 101; Goshen 64; Converse 60; Sublette 50; Big Horn 46; Hot Springs 28; Crook 27; Johnson 23; Weston 17; Platte 13; Niobrara County has one case.

The Wyoming Department of Health reports that 4,000 lab-confirmed and probable cases have recovered across the state. More than 140,000 tests have been completed statewide.

(Commercial labs are required to report positive test results to WDH; negative results are not reported consistently.)

Governor Mark Gordon's Press Briefings

Press Conference on COVID-19, September 9, 2020

State Orders -- Updated August 27, 2020

The Wyoming State Health Officer has issued the following public health orders:

Statewide Gatherings

On June 16, the Wyoming Department of Health announced it will now allow in-person visits at long-term care facilities, but under specific guidelines. Visits will only take place in a designated outdoor space, and will be limited to two visitors at a time. Also, visitors will be screened for COVID-19 symptoms, and they’ll have to wear a face covering, while staff and residents will need to wear a surgical face mask. Additionally, a facility staff member trained in patient safety and infection control measures must remain with the resident at all times during the visit. As facilities decide whether or not to allow visits, WDH is asking them to consider local conditions.

The Wyoming State Health Officer has issued the following public health orders:

On August 26, an extension to Wyoming’s current public health orders released today by the Wyoming Department of Health contain no changes. The orders, which remain in effect through September 15, continue to allow outdoor gatherings of no more than 50% of venue capacity, with a maximum of 1,000 people as long as social distancing and increased sanitization measures are in place. Indoor gatherings in a confined space remain limited to 50 persons without restrictions and 250 persons if social distancing and sanitization measures are incorporated.

On May 15, many restrictions under the above public health orders were eased. Restaurants may offer outdoor and indoor dining under certain guidelines, including but not limited to: staff that come within six feet of customers or other staff must wear face coverings; tables must be at least six feet apart; and tables must be limited to groups of six people, preferably of the same household.

The public health orders also ease certain restrictions to other public gathering areas, including gyms, salons, movie theatres, performance venues, as well as churches, faith-based organizations, and funeral homes. For more details to each of the restrictions, please see links to public health orders above.

The prohibition does not apply to gatherings at private residences, hotels and motels for lodging purposes, government facilities and businesses, grocery stores and retail or business establishments that can provide adequate social distance spacing of 6 feet or more. Healthcare facilities are also exempt, as are long-term care and assisted living facilities that are complying with Wyoming Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control directives.

Wyoming Public Media would like to thank and recognize all health care workers, doctors, nurses caregivers, grocery store workers, truck drivers, and delivery workers during the global pandemic.

News & Updates:

Resources:

Do you have specific questions about the virus in Wyoming, you or your family’s health, what this means for your job, your home and your town's economy? Please submit them here and we'll do our best to report the information you need.

We also want to hear from you on how your community is responding. Tell us what you're seeing, hearing and experiencing in your neighborhood, grocery store and beyond.

On social media, use the hashtag #COVID19WY.

Ways to Connect

The Utah Department of Health reported 911 COVID-19 cases Thursday, setting a new record in the state for most new cases in a single day since the pandemic began.

Gov. Gary Herbert said due to the ongoing COVID spike, the state will postpone any decision on loosening coronavirus restrictions in counties across the state. Thirteen counties are currently in the green, new normal phase of their pandemic response, and the rest of the state is in the yellow, low-restriction phase.

Cayla Nimmo, Star-Tribune

The University of Wyoming is part of an international effort to create a rapid handheld test for COVID-19.

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

The poll came from the Colorado Health Foundation but national polls over the past few months paint a similar picture.

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

Researchers recently investigated three outbreaks of COVID-19 at child care centers in Salt Lake City. Their findings are helping to fill a knowledge gap on how younger children might spread the virus.

Two of the outbreaks started after staff came to work while their sick relatives were experiencing COVID-19 symptoms at home. In the third outbreak, it’s unclear who brought it in, but in the end children in that particular outbreak seemed to have passed the virus to at least five people at home, including a parent who had to be hospitalized.

Tennessee Watson

How do you think K-12 schools are doing AFTER returning to in-person classes?

By contributing your comment, you consent to the possibility of having it read on the air. 

WPM/NPR Community Discussion Rules

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

Catherine Wheeler

In Cody, Park County School District Number 6 Superintendent Peggy Monteith said with all the uncertainty going on in the world, she was just happy to see kids climb onto a school bus on the first day of school?

"I stopped behind the bus with their red lights on and watched these little, little guys get on the bus with their masks. And I was an emotional mess by the time I got to the school because I was so happy to see them back on buses, but also so sad that they had to get on buses in masks," Monteith said. "What a world! It's turned upside down."

pxhere via CC0 Public Domain

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many have turned to the great outdoors in an effort to get out of their house but still stay away from people. And with more people out of work, it also helps to be able to fill the freezer. For some, stocking up on food during the pandemic means buying extra meat. For others, it means buying a hunting license and heading into the field. For Tylynn Smith from Laramie, it's her first time going hunting.

University of Wyoming


University of Wyoming officials had high hopes for phasing students back into the classroom, but those hopes were dashed when large numbers of positive COVID-19 tests started coming in.

As of Thursday, September 10, the university had 66 active cases. And 63 of those were students, 50 of whom live off-campus.

Kevin Vandivier

Taking a vitamin D supplement may be a good idea as the summer comes to an end. Medical experts say it can provide a boost to your immune system, and may even help your body fight the coronavirus.

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

Nate Hegyi, rural reporter for the Mountain West News Bureau, is embarking on a 900-mile cycling trip crisscrossing the continental divide in August and September, interviewing and listening to Americans ahead of the 2020 election. You can follow along on social media, an online blog and this "Where Is He Now?" map.

Pages