Coronavirus In Wyoming: Resources & News

Wyoming Public Media is here to keep you current on the news surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. 

Updated 12/02/20 3:30 p.m.

The Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) reported 702 new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday. There have been 34,507 cases total, and there are currently 7,709 active cases in the state. There are 234 people hospitalized with the coronavirus in the state, according to self-reported hospital data.

The WDH reported 15 additional coronavirus-related deaths on Tuesday, bringing the state's overall death toll to 230. The deaths included residents from Big Horn, Campbell, Carbon, Fremont, Hot Springs, Laramie, Platte and Weston counties. Ten of those who died were older; 13 had been hospitalized; and 14 were known to have conditions recognized as putting patients at a higher risk of serious illness related to COVID-19.

Here are the numbers of lab-confirmed total cases broken down by county: Laramie 4,667; Natrona 4,228; Fremont 3,015; Albany 2,894; Campbell 2,878; Sweetwater 1,849; Sheridan 1,754; Teton 1,631; Park 1,246; Uinta 907; Goshen 711; Carbon 666; Lincoln 593; Big Horn 470; Converse 416; Washakie 395; Sublette 355; Weston 342; Crook 290; Johnson 234; Platte 225; Hot Springs 148; Niobrara 52.

Since March, 26,568 people have recovered from the virus.

(Commercial labs are required to report positive test results to WDH; negative results are not reported consistently.)

Governor Mark Gordon's Press Briefings

Press Conference on COVID-19, November 16th, 2020

State Orders -- Updated November 19, 2020

The Wyoming State Health Officer has issued the following public health orders:

The Wyoming Department of Health has changed the quarantine protocol for K-12 school settings. Specifically, quarantine is no longer required if a potential exposure occurs where both the infected student and close contacts were wearing face coverings.

Statewide Gatherings

On June 16, the Wyoming Department of Health announced it will now allow in-person visits at long-term care facilities, but under specific guidelines. Visits will only take place in a designated outdoor space, and will be limited to two visitors at a time. Also, visitors will be screened for COVID-19 symptoms, and they’ll have to wear a face covering, while staff and residents will need to wear a surgical face mask. Additionally, a facility staff member trained in patient safety and infection control measures must remain with the resident at all times during the visit. As facilities decide whether or not to allow visits, WDH is asking them to consider local conditions.

On November 19th, the Wyoming State Health Officer has issued the following public health orders:

The orders, which remain in effect through December 15, continue to allow outdoor gatherings of no more than 50% of venue capacity, with a maximum of 250 people as long as social distancing and increased sanitization measures are in place. Indoor gatherings in a confined space remain limited to 25 persons without restrictions and 100 persons if social distancing and sanitization measures are incorporated.

On May 15, many restrictions under the above public health orders were eased. Restaurants may offer outdoor and indoor dining under certain guidelines, including but not limited to: staff that come within six feet of customers or other staff must wear face coverings; tables must be at least six feet apart; and tables must be limited to groups of six people, preferably of the same household.

The public health orders also ease certain restrictions to other public gathering areas, including gyms, salons, movie theatres, performance venues, as well as churches, faith-based organizations, and funeral homes. For more details to each of the restrictions, please see links to public health orders above.

The prohibition does not apply to gatherings at private residences, hotels and motels for lodging purposes, government facilities and businesses, grocery stores and retail or business establishments that can provide adequate social distance spacing of 6 feet or more. Healthcare facilities are also exempt, as are long-term care and assisted living facilities that are complying with Wyoming Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control directives.

Wyoming Public Media would like to thank and recognize all health care workers, doctors, nurses caregivers, grocery store workers, truck drivers, and delivery workers during the global pandemic.

News & Updates:

Resources:

Do you have specific questions about the virus in Wyoming, you or your family’s health, what this means for your job, your home and your town's economy? Please submit them here and we'll do our best to report the information you need.

We also want to hear from you on how your community is responding. Tell us what you're seeing, hearing and experiencing in your neighborhood, grocery store and beyond.

On social media, use the hashtag #COVID19WY.

Ways to Connect

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Peabody Energy's share price over the past year
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Ekaterina Pokrovsky / Adobe Stock


When Willow Belden goes holiday shopping she likes to support local businesses. This year, though, it's meant calling stores and asking, "Are you guys wearing masks? But are you really wearing masks? And, like, what else are you doing?"

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https://www.nursetogether.com

Washakie County Commissioners have voted out their public health officer, after what some describe as a miscommunication between the commission and Dr. Ed Zimmerman.

Wyoming Legislature logo
Wyoming Legislature

The Campbell County Commissioners have chosen a replacement for the late Roy Edwards. Former Campbell County Commissioner Chris Knapp will take over the term of Rep. Edwards and represent District 53 at the state legislature.

As the pandemic surges across the nation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday advised against families and friends gathering for Thanksgiving. But there is one potentially safe way to see relatives and celebrate the holiday – camping.

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