business

Impact 307

Five finalists have been announced in the Sheridan Start-Up Challenge.

It's the fourth year of the entrepreneurial competition with the goal of helping new businesses grow. The event is put on by Impact 307, a business incubator in Sheridan, which is part of the University of Wyoming.

Wyoming Business and Industry Federation

Chambers of Commerce across the state are taking steps to ensure local businesses survive the coronavirus pandemic.

The Wyoming Business and Industry Federation is made up of several chambers of commerce and advocates for businesses in the state. It's developed a two-phase plan.

Wyoming Women's Foundation

The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Wyoming 2020 recently came out. It's a study that takes into account all kinds of factors for working families, including how many adults are in your household, the number of children, or which county you live in. And then it works like a calculator to determine the amount of income required to meet basic needs at a minimally adequate level.

City of Powell

The Mozambican government is looking to develop business partnerships with the city of Powell and in the Bighorn Basin.

sheridanwyoming.org

A native plant nursery, a traveling physical therapy service and a sports pain relief aid manufacturer are this year's winners of the Sheridan Start-Up Challenge.

President Donald Trump mentioned Boise-based Micron during his speech before the United Nations on Tuesday, using the high-tech company to denounce China’s trade tactics.

 


Kamila Kudelska

If you've never been to a Shopko, it's similar to a small Walmart. You can get groceries, apparel and lawn products all in one place. They're usually found in small towns.

Back in March, Shopko announced it will be closing all its locations, and it's a big deal for small towns. This is a big deal but towns throughout the Big Horn Basin are being proactive about the news.

Business leaders are seeing climate change as a major risk to their bottom line. And according to a new report, more companies are planning for it.

Worldwide, 72 percent of businesses are preparing for climate risks as part of their overall business strategy. That's true here in the U.S., but that number drops down to 65 percent.

Tony Webster via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Four communities in the Big Horn Basin joined forces to find solutions when they learned Shopko would be leaving their towns. The retail store's bankruptcy will affect 13 communities in Wyoming.

An online startup out of Idaho has launched a new service pitched as Airbnb for hunters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts.


Courtesy Image

Wyoming communities will soon see new investments in businesses and jobs thanks to a nonprofit that plans to reserve a portion of its $65 million New Markets Tax Credit award for the state.

Montana and Idaho Community Development Corporation (MICDC) will invest about $12 million in Wyoming projects in hopes of improving the state’s economy. The nonprofit expanded into Wyoming this past July and will use the first of its U.S. Treasury award for contributions to Wyoming businesses and organizations.

Logo is courtesy of the Wyoming Blockchain Coalition

You may have heard a little about Blockchain, but if some people in Wyoming have their way, you will learn a lot about it. Because according to these experts, legislation that Wyoming lawmakers are considering this year could open the floodgates for Blockchain businesses. Some lawmakers are comparing it to the internet boom of the 1990’s and say it could completely change Wyoming’s economic future. 

coralandtusk.com

A Brooklyn-based design company is moving its inventory and order fulfillment hub to Pinedale. Artist Stephanie Housley creates embroidered home décor under the brand name Coral and Tusk, which is sold around the world. 

About a year and a half ago, she and her husband decided to move from Brooklyn to the western part of Wyoming. Housley said the landscapes she has visited in the state inspired many of her designs. 

Bob Beck

Last year the governor set up the Economically Needed Diversity Options for Wyoming Council, better known as ENDOW.

After a few months of touring the state and meetings, ENDOW has developed a list of recommendations to start setting the stage for diversifying the economy. Greg Hill is the Chairman of Endow and he tells Bob Beck why ENDOW is different from past economic development efforts. 

Tony Webster from Portland, OR

Rocky Mountain Power is one of many around the country turning up their investment in wind.

 

Bright Agrotech; https://pixabay.com/en/vertical-farm-green-wall-bok-choy-916337/

Seven years after getting its start in a storage unit in Laramie, the company Bright Agrotech is merging with a San Francisco firm.

Bright’s founders developed a technology that allows people to grow food vertically, on indoor towers or exterior walls. Their hydroponic systems nourish plants using nutrient solutions instead of soil. They provide education and equipment to farmers around the world who are interested in this kind of production.

twitter.com/Uber

Uber has been operating in the state for just over a month now. Their launch followed Governor Matt Mead’s signing of a bill to legally authorize ride-sharing companies in Wyoming. However, while some consumers have been taking advantage of the service, others are less excited.

Branden French was one of the very first drivers to start working for Uber in March. Right now, he’s a university student in Laramie. He said Mead signed the bill on a Friday, and he was on the road that weekend.

The City of Laramie has hired a consultant to convince shops and restaurants to set up storefronts there.

City Manager Janine Jordan said in a press release that even though Laramie has a thriving downtown, the community has room for more retailers, especially when she compares it to other college towns.

https://pixabay.com/en/chemistry-chemical-flask-glass-155121/

After accepting a $15 million dollar loan from the State of Wyoming, Standard Alcohol Inc. is continuing plans for a new facility at Swan Ranch, outside of Cheyenne. The loan is set to be paid back in twenty years, while the rest of the funding for the $76 million dollar plant will come from private investments.

The company will use natural gas, coal, and CO2 to create a gasoline additive that company vice president Robert Johns says is high value.

picserver.org/e/economy.html

Wyoming’s economy is the most sluggish in the nation, according to a report released by Bloomberg in December. That ranking came from analysis of employment, income, stock and home prices, as well as late mortgage payments around the nation. Bloomberg analysts attributed the state’s poor score to the recent energy downturn, as well as the fact that Wyoming has no urban center, where job growth tends to accelerate.

Wyoming Business Alliance

Around 500 people will come together at the Little America Hotel in Cheyenne November 10 and 11 for the 2016 Governor’s Business Forum.

The theme this year is Innovation and Resilience for the Future. Wyoming Business Alliance president Bill Schilling joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard for a preview of the event.

Caroline Ballard

This week, the New American Economy issued a report on the economic impact of immigrants in every state, highlighting the role immigrants play as entrepreneurs. One place where immigrants are starting new companies in Wyoming is the Wyoming Technology Business Center – a business incubator for start-ups.

David Swift

 

When someone gets sick, it can be difficult to know what to do for them. Should you bring flowers, food, a card? Jackson resident Kathleen Neiley is providing an answer to that question and employing rural women around the state with her new business Full Circle.

Quilts. The company creates custom, group funded t-shirt quilts for cancer patients, and its workforce will be made up of women in rural areas of Wyoming. Neiley told Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard the idea came from her own experiences.

The Modern West 11: Eats And Drinks

May 16, 2016
Bob Beck

This month we’re putting specialty coffee, locally distilled spirits, and goat meat on the menu. Hear what’s happening in the Western kitchen. 

The state of Wyoming was amongst the locations revealed in the data leak of the Panama Papers, that involved the large offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca. The leak included 11.5 million confidential files and pointed to millionaires and others that may be hiding their money in Wyoming based shell companies.

Miles Bryan

  

H+S Coffee Head Roaster Coulter Sunderman has some advice for how you should consume your morning cup of coffee: remember to slurp.

“You want to slurp,” Sunderman says before a coffee tasting at H+S’s space in downtown Laramie. “It aerates the coffee across your tongue.”

The tasting would be familiar to anyone who's been to a wine tasting: the gathered coffee fans sample six unmarked cups, and toss out tasting notes like “cashew,” “peanut butter,” and “cola.”

Miles Bryan

Let’s start in 2011, when Wyoming was rocked by an investigation from the national news agency Reuters entitled, A Little House on the Secrets on the Great Plains.

“When you think of traditional secrecy and tax havens you most likely think of Switzerland, and the Caribbean,” begins the Reuters reporter in the accompanying video. She’s standing under the “Welcome to Wyoming” sign on I-80 outside of Cheyenne.

Wikipedia Creative Commons

Wyoming continues to rank number one in the nation in taxes for business. That’s from a report released by the Tax Foundation on Tuesday. The state’s lack of corporate and individual income tax has kept in in first place since 2012.

Wyoming Director Tony Gagliardi is with the National Federation of Independent Business’. He says the state deserves only a cautious congratulation since some of Wyoming’s taxes are going up. For instance, fuel taxes have increased and that could hurt farmers and hauling companies.

Wyoming teen Megan Grassell was listed as one Time’s 25 Most Influential Teens of 2014 this week, joining the ranks of Malia Obama and Nobel Peace Prize Winner Malala Yousafzai. She spoke with Wyoming Public Radio's Caroline Ballard about her success.

With the help of a kickstarter campaign that raised $42-thousand dollars, Grassell created her own company. Yellowberry makes training bras for pre-teen and teenage girls. Grassell, 19, was inspired after taking her younger sister shopping for her first bra. All of the training bras she tried on were padded and mature-looking. 

Sushiesque via Flickr

A new study claims that Wyoming is missing out on millions of dollars of lost business by not legalizing same sex marriage.

The study comes from the Williams Institute, a think tank housed at the University of California Los Angeles. It claims that Wyoming would see over two million dollars in new revenues in the first few years after gay marriage is legalized.

Pages