Erin Jones

Cultural Affairs Producer

Phone: 307-766-2418                    
Email: ejones29@uwyo.edu

Erin Jones is Wyoming Public Radio’s cultural affairs producer, as well as the host and senior producer of HumaNature. She began her audio career as an intern in the Wyoming Public Radio newsroom, and has reported on issues ranging from wild horse euthanization programs to the future of liberal arts in universities. Her audio work has been featured on WHYY Philadelphia’s The Pulse and the podcast Out There

In addition to her regular production work on HumaNature, she has led two innovative science series for the podcast: “Science Camp”, which explored the human side of science, and “The Event Horizon”, which started with black holes, detoured through god, and ended with death.

Erin earned her Bachelor of Arts from The University of Texas at Austin in geography, and her Master of Fine Arts from the University of Wyoming in creative writing and environment and natural resources. Her writing has won the Frank Nelson Doubleday Award, a Kimmel Harding Nelson residency, and publications in The Normal School andWestern Confluence

Erin grew up in Texas, Utah, and Georgia, but she’s mostly Texan. Her partner in crime is her Hurricane Harvey rescue lab mix, Frankie.

Ways to Connect

Kamila Kudelska

Listen to the full show here.

"The Spanish School:" Mexican Segregation In Northwest Wyoming

Usually segregation in school is something you heard about in the south. But it turns out Wyoming had segregated schools as well. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska goes back in history and takes a look at one such school in Worland.

Erin Jones


When you think of pioneers, you might imagine Little House on the Prairie. Or the Oregon Trail game we all played in the nineties. One thing these popular depictions of pioneers have in common is they're White. But pioneers weren't all White, and historians argue it's important to set the record straight.

Erin Jones


The award-winning Wyoming Public Media podcast HumaNature enters its sixth season this coming week. The podcast host and senior producer Erin Jones joined Bob Beck to discuss the podcast, the upcoming season and how HumaNature came about.

Regal House Publishing

Even though there's a pandemic happening, life must go on—and that includes publishing books. After being delayed from a June publication, a new novel from a Wyoming author has just been published.

Susan Simpson

The legal right to vote doesn't always translate to the ability to vote. 

There can be barriers to the polls, says Susan Simpson, the president of the League of Women Voters of Wyoming. That's a nonpartisan organization that provides information on political candidates and works for higher participation in the political process. Simpson talked with Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones about how Wyoming measures up when it comes to voting access.

Catherine Wheeler

Listen to the full show here.

Fewer Cars On The Road, Fewer Dollars For Highways: What COVID-19 Means For WYDOT

While many businesses are losing money in the state, so are some Wyoming agencies. One that's getting the hardest hit is the Wyoming Department of Transportation. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler explains.

Šarūnas Burdulis via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

The news can tend to focus on everything that's going wrong. So Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones wanted to know about Wyomingites' pandemic silver linings. Here are some of the voicemails you left.

Ben Markley

As people stay at home due to COVID-19, it's harder for musicians to play music together. And a lot of them miss it. So one Wyoming artist came up with a creative way to collaborate.

Looking for a pandemic read? Craig Johnson, Nina McConigley, and others have plenty of recommendations.

Listen to the full show here. 

Reported COVID-19 Numbers Are The Floor, Not The Ceiling

Wyoming is one of the states with the fewest number of COVID-19 lab confirmed cases. That's good news. But officials say the state still needs to be careful and not fall into a false sense of security that could cause a second wave and end up being disastrous to the health and economy of the state. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska reports.

AP Photo, Sarah Voegele

By some accounts, Shakespeare wrote King Lear while he was physical distancing during the plague. But that puts a lot of pressure on anyone trying to do creative work while life is in limbo. So how are Wyoming writers coping with quarantine in 2020? And what can we learn from them about creativity in times of stress?

State of Wyoming

Listen to the full show here.

Governor Gordon Favors A Conservative Approach Towards Dealing With The Pandemic

Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon says despite calls to reopen businesses he prefers to take a more conservative approach as Wyoming approaches the COVID-19 peak for the state.

Public Domain

So many of the things we had all hoped to do this spring are canceled. And we grieve those things, big and small. But grief can fester, or it can air.

So Wyoming Public Radio set up a voicemail for you to give air to your grief. And you answered—with dozens of replies, messages, and voicemails. Listen to the voices of Wyoming residents reflecting on what they've lost due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Courtesy University of Wyoming Art Museum

Arts organizations throughout Wyoming are stepping up with creative online activities while the coronavirus epidemic keeps people home.

Erin Jones

As people follow recommendations to stay home in the face of the coronavirus pandemic, some folks are left totally alone. That can be disruptive to mental health—especially in a state with one of the leading suicide rates.

During the coronavirus pandemic, people are following advice to stay home. Fewer customers means less cash flow for small local businesses. That's especially true when businesses have to close altogether. And that affects the entire community, as employees are left adrift.

U.S. Capitol Building
Public Domain

Listen to the full show here.

Two Wyoming Republicans Are Playing A Role In The Impeachment Debate

Two Wyoming lawmakers are playing key roles in the impeachment saga slowly unfolding in Washington. Correspondent Matt Laslo has the details from the nation’s capital.

Alex Myers

A new novel tells the story of a newly-out transgender Harvard student who has to give everything up when his family and girlfriend reject him. He's broke and looking for a new start—so he heads to Wyoming. Continental Divide is partly based on the real-life experiences of author Alex Myers, who was the first openly transgender student at Harvard. He talked with Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones about Wyoming, masculinity, and writing a new kind of fiction.

Craig Johnson

Bestselling author Craig Johnson has just published his fifteenth book. Land of Wolves continues the adventures of Walt Longmire, a sheriff who solves mysteries in a fictional rural Wyoming county.

Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones learned about the ten years of perfecting his first novel, how to maintain relationships when you're an artist, and what it's like now to write a book a year.

What if you could put all your hard feelings—grief, depression, sadness—into the body of another person? That’s the premise of the new speculative young adult novel The Grief Keeper. And the people charged with carrying the grief of others? United States immigrants.

Ballet With A Twist

Sep 27, 2019
Ballets with a Twist

A New York City ballet company is coming to Cheyenne, with a performance called Cocktail Hour: The Show. It's exactly what it sounds like: dance vignettes of drinks. The Bloody Mary, the Mint Julep, the Shirley Temple...all performed with original choreography, music, and costumes. This is classical ballet with a twist. Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones got the scoop from choreographer Marilyn Klaus.

Erin Jones

The Internet has changed a lot of things about the way we read, think, and do politics, and it's also changed the creative writing of teens. Spoiler, this is a positive story about kids and the Internet.

A gas flare, used to burn off flammable gas -- on Highway 59 from Gillette
Cooper McKim / Wyoming Public Radio

Listen to the full show here.

Barrasso Pushes To Get Wyoming Natural Gas Sold Overseas

U.S. House Democrats are taking aim at an issue Wyoming Senator John Barrasso seems to have spent the most time on in the past few years: Exporting American, well – Wyoming energy – abroad. Correspondent Matt Laslo has the story from Washington.

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