Benjamin Swasey

Ben Swasey is a deputy editor on the Washington Desk, covering politics and voting.

A Massachusetts native, Swasey was previously a political editor and digital manager at WBUR in Boston.

Combating the coronavirus pandemic has been job one for the Biden administration's first 100 days.

President Biden leaned into the 100-day marker, setting goals for vaccinations and in-person schooling, and asking Americans to mask up for the three-plus months.

So with Biden's first 100 days in office ending this week, here's a quick look back at the pandemic's course, using the simple metrics of cases, deaths and vaccinations.

Former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama say a Minneapolis jury "did the right thing" in convicting former police officer Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd.

Though they said that justice was done in this case, the nation's first Black president and his wife said in a statement, "we know that true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial."

They added:

While the debate and recriminations over Georgia's controversial new election law continue, some attention turns elsewhere, to other states where lawmakers are similarly weighing contested voting legislation.

President Biden this week unveiled a massive infrastructure proposal that he says would deliver a "once-in-a-generation investment" in the United States.

Here are six key numbers from the wide-ranging measure:

$2 trillion

The plan's overall estimated price tag.

Updated March 31, 2021 at 1:31 PM ET

Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz, a controversial conservative and boisterous ally of former President Donald Trump's, confirmed Tuesday he is being investigated by the Department of Justice over sexual misconduct but denied the allegations tied to the probe.

The Biden administration has announced that it will begin shipping about 1 million COVID-19 vaccine doses a week directly to thousands of pharmacies in an attempt to address equity concerns and speed up the country's crucial inoculation effort.

The vaccines sent to pharmacies will be in addition to the millions of doses sent weekly to states, territories and tribes and that are sometimes administered at local pharmacies.

Updated at 5:46 p.m. ET

President Biden announced Tuesday that his administration is working to purchase an additional 200 million doses of the two COVID-19 vaccines that have been authorized for emergency use, with the goal, the White House says, of having enough vaccine supply for the entire adult U.S. population by the end of the summer.

He also announced steps to increase vaccine doses going to state and local governments over the next three weeks, and to provide them more clarity going forward about how much supply they should expect.

Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden is tapping Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, a Biden ally with deep ties to unions, as his labor secretary.

The Democrat campaigned for the White House saying he'd be the "most pro-union president you've ever seen."

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

Congress reconvened Wednesday night to certify President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory, just hours after the U.S. Capitol was thrust into chaos by supporters of President Trump — an angry mob that breached the complex in an unprecedented violent act at the seat of America's federal government.

In a contest with historic turnout, President-elect Joe Biden topped President Trump by nearly 7 million votes, and 74 votes in the Electoral College, but his victory really was stitched together with narrow margins in a handful of states.

President-elect Joe Biden said in a statement that "it's time for America to unite," after he was declared the winner of the presidency by The Associated Press.

Biden will address the nation Saturday at 8 p.m. ET and will be joined by the vice president-elect, Kamala Harris, and their spouses.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

You're probably anxious about the results, but patience may truly be a virtue on election night.

Democrats enter the presidential contest's homestretch with a big cash advantage.

President Trump's campaign announced late Thursday that it, the Republican National Committee and joint committees raised $248 million in September — a strong haul but nonetheless well behind the record-setting one-month sum collected by Joe Biden's campaign and his party.

Updated at 1:29 p.m. ET

President Trump's positive coronavirus test adds him to a growing list of world leaders who've contracted the virus that causes COVID-19.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

A New York Times investigation published on Sunday said that President Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes each year in 2016 and 2017, which the president denied at a news conference using a familiar retort: "fake news."

The Times cites Trump's long-sought-after tax returns, further reporting that he paid no income taxes at all in 10 of the previous 15 years as Trump reported massive losses to his businesses.

Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins says the nomination of a Supreme Court justice to fill the vacancy left by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg should be made by whichever candidate wins the presidential election.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, stopped outside the Supreme Court Saturday morning, following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

"Justice Ginsburg was a titan—a relentless defender of justice and a legal mind for the ages," Harris said in a tweet. "The stakes of this election couldn't be higher. Millions of Americans are counting on us to win and protect the Supreme Court—for their health, for their families, and for their rights."

Football and the presidential campaign have intersected yet again.

President Trump on Wednesday cheered the Big Ten Conference's decision to resume its college football season in late October.

President Trump and Republicans could've set a one-month fundraising record — had their Democratic counterparts not hauled in some $150 million more.

The president's campaign, the Republican National Committee and their joint fundraising efforts raised a combined $210 million last month, they announced on Wednesday.

Updated at 3:19 p.m. ET

National convention planning for Republicans and Democrats continued to evolve on Wednesday, as the parties try to adapt their nominating events, which are typically filled with throngs of people, to the realities of the ongoing pandemic.

Updated at 8:41 a.m. ET

Cori Bush, a nurse and Black Lives Matter activist, has ousted longtime Missouri U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay in a Democratic primary, according to The Associated Press.

It's the latest example of a progressive challenger topping a long-tenured Democratic incumbent.

Voters head to the polls in a handful of states Tuesday, in the latest tests of voting systems stressed by the ongoing pandemic.

Teams in the National Basketball Association, the American pro sports league long most vocal on social justice issues, are stepping up their civic participation, as three have now volunteered their facilities to serve as voting sites amid the pandemic.

The development comes as local election officials, especially those in major metropolitan areas, frantically search for places that are centrally located and big enough to allow voters to social distance while waiting in line and casting their ballots.

Updated at 4:48 p.m. ET

A video shared by President Trump on Twitter Sunday includes a man who appears to be a Trump supporter saying "white power" in response to protesters.

In the video, apparently taken at The Villages, a retirement community in Florida, people wearing Trump shirts and with Trump signs on their golf carts drive by protesters yelling insults at them and about the president.

Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET

As overlapping crises convulse an anxious nation, President Trump on Sunday sought to cast blame for widespread protests gripping cities on "radical-left anarchists," while adding that the media "is doing everything within their power to foment hatred and anarchy."

Updated on April 23 at 8:20 a.m. ET

A high-ranking federal scientist focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post because of his "insistence" that the government spend funds on "safe and scientifically vetted solutions" to address the coronavirus crisis and not on "drugs, vaccines and other technologies that lack scientific merit."

Editor's note: This story has been updated with an entry for Jan. 14 with statements from WHO about human-to-human transmission.

On Tuesday, President Trump said he's suspending U.S. funding for the World Health Organization. He said the agency has "mismanaged" the pandemic, has been slow to respond to the crisis and is "China-centric."

We looked at the public record to see what Trump and the WHO had to say over the past 15 weeks about the coronavirus pandemic. Here's a timeline highlighting key quotes.

Jan. 5

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET Tuesday

Joe Biden has won the Wisconsin Democratic primary, garnering 63% of the vote.

The former vice president was already the party's presumptive presidential nominee, after Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign last week.

Sanders formally endorsed Biden on Monday.

Updated at 4:27 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders officially endorsed his former rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, on Monday.

Sanders, who suspended his campaign last week, had long said he'd support whoever won the Democratic nomination, but he did not formally endorse Biden when he announced an end to his own run on Wednesday.

Sanders made the announcement as he remotely joined Biden on a livestream video.

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