Taylar Stagner

Cultural Affairs Volunteer and Part-Time News Reporter

Taylar Dawn Stagner is from Riverton, Wyoming and is Northern Arapahoe and Eastern Shoshone. A graduate of the undergraduate American Studies program, Taylar is accustomed to working at the intersections of activism, art, and academia. She was a McNair Scholar and a recipient of funding from the Social Justice Research Center for her research about the Wind River Reservation. She has presented her research at conferences across the country and loves to act and perform. The opportunity to work with talented staff at Wyoming Public Media is a privilege and she is ecstatic to learn and help as much as she can.

Matt Celeskey

This summer two professors excavated the fossilized remains of a Phytosaur on the Wind River Indian Reservation without explicit permission from the Northern Arapaho or Eastern Shoshone tribes. 

University of Wyoming

The 2018-2019 Symphony Orchestra season at the University of Wyoming is shaping up to be a magical one. Literally. This season will have pieces inspired by famous magical stories such as “A Midsummer Night's Dream” and “The Nutcracker”.

Shawn Parker

On October 5 through 7, the Sheridan WYO Film Festival will kick off its new event by showing Miss Snake Charmer. The world premiere will be in good company with 33 other films from all over the world. There were over 600 entrants from 54 countries.

University of Wyoming


Orientation is a common activity for freshmen at any university. While there are students who don’t want to go, some relish the chance to meet new people and well… orient themselves. University of Wyoming President Laurie Nichols set a goal of increasing the number of Native Americans attending UW, especially since enrollment of tribal members recently reached an all-time low. Wyoming Public Radio’s Taylar Stagner participated in the Native American Research Center’s first-ever orientation. The goal is to make students comfortable from day one. 

Although we live in the West not everyone has the opportunity to ride a horse. A summit in Jackson is trying to make horses accessible to more people. Even if you live far away and sometimes need help going through your day today.

A recently published paper argues that more self-determination and frank discussions about structural racism could help improve access to health care for indigenous populations.

Last week, Governor Matt Mead approved new social studies content and performance standards. The changes are the result of the 2017 Indian Education for All Act, which requires schools statewide to teach the history and culture of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho. 

The Oglala Lakota leader Crazy Horse helped lead The Battle of the Greasy Grass. That the tribe’s name for what non-Natives call the Battle of Little Big Horn. Crazy Horse has had many biographies written about him, but never from someone related to the leader.

Floyd Clown and William Matson have changed that.

The two have recently collaborated on a book, Crazy Horse: The Lakota Warrior’s Life and Legacy, an oral history of Crazy Horse from his direct decedents. Only recently has the family felt that it was time to tell their story.

Ivory Brien is Really Good at Basketball, Flathead Reservation, Montana, 2016 by Sue Reynolds.

The new website Everyday Native highlights the use of photography and poetry to help bridge the gap between Native and non-Native students alongside their teachers. 

The second Native American Summer Institute wrapped up last month and grew from 28 students last year to 38 this year. Participants were high school Native American students with an interest in coming to the University of Wyoming. Most students were from the Wind River Reservation, but also from as far as Billings, Montana. The students participated in workshops over the week that included student-driven talks about being Native American.