Meg Anderson

Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team. She helps shape the team's groundbreaking work for radio, digital and social platforms. She served as a producer on the Peabody Award-winning series Lost Mothers, which investigated the high rate of maternal mortality in the United States. She also contributes her own original reporting to the team, including the series Heat and Health in American Cities, which investigated the link between heat, health and poverty in cities across the country. That series won the National Press Foundation Innovative Storytelling Award and an honorable mention for the Philip Meyer Journalism Award. She also completed a fellowship as a local reporter for WAMU, the public radio station for Washington, D.C. Before joining the investigations team, she was an integral part of NPR's 2016 election team and also had brief stints on NPR's Morning Edition and the Education desk. Her roots are in the Midwest, where she graduated with a Master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

Every four years, the Electoral College creeps back into the lives of American voters. In some presidential elections, the strange, indirect system used to select the next U.S. president can feel like a formality that doesn't seem to matter much.

In other elections, it matters very much indeed. This is one of those years.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said Friday that she plans to vote in favor of legalizing recreational marijuana in California.

"I will vote for it, but I have not made a public statement about it until right this very second," Pelosi, who represents the district that serves San Francisco, told the editorial board and reporters at the Los Angeles Times.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Federal agents now have a search warrant they need to examine the thousands of emails found on a computer belonging to former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner that could be pertinent to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's personal email server, sources familiar with the matter tell NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Weiner is the estranged husband of Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

President Obama has a very busy week ahead of him. According to a schedule released by the White House, the president plans to campaign Tuesday through Friday next week for Hillary Clinton. He is likely to keep up the vigorous campaign schedule in the days leading up to the election.

It's time to talk about ballot measures. Or rather, those other things voters are deciding on Nov. 8.

This November, there are 156 measures being voted on in 35 states and the District of Columbia. California is in the lead, with a whopping 17 measures on its ballot.

Although these ballot measures are voted on state by state, there are some big national themes.

This election has been particularly noisy.

But when all the Twitter storms and heated exchanges (maybe) fade away after Nov. 8, the issues that affect real voters will remain.

With that in mind, we set out to create a cheat sheet on where each candidate stands on the issues voters care about most. The issues we chose to highlight come from the top 10 issues voters said were "very important" to their vote, according to a 2016 poll from the Pew Research Center.

WikiLeaks on Saturday released another tranche of emails allegedly linked to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, bringing the total to more than 11,000 emails released over the last eight days.

This batch was the eighth installment of what Wikileaks says are Podesta's emails, and the controversial organization claims to have more than 50,000 emails in total that they plan to release.

Jin Park remembers where he was when Donald Trump announced his presidential bid in June, 2015. He was alone in his Harvard dorm room and watching Trump on TV.

"When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best," Trump told the crowd at New York's Trump Tower, "They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people."

Then he proposed a wall along the United States border with Mexico.

The controversial whistleblower organization WikiLeaks on Friday released emails that they say are linked to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It'll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump's bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama's executive orders on immigration.

The most popular time to tweet in the last couple days, if you're a presidential candidate, has been before the sun rises.

On Saturday, Hillary Clinton unleashed a pre-dawn tweetstorm in response to Donald Trump's now-infamous early-morning tweets the previous day.

Contrasting tweetstorms

In her 3 a.m. tweets, Clinton focused on policy — specifically on national service, which was the focus on a speech she gave Friday.

Pages