Coronavirus In Wyoming: Resources & News

Wyoming Public Media is here to keep you current on the news surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. 

The Latest News On COVID-19 In Wyoming 

Updated 10:40 a.m. MDT 3/26/2020

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wyoming has reached 53. Laramie County numbers continue to climb with two new cases tying it with Fremont for the highest confirmed cases with 14.

Teton County now has 7 cases and Johnson County reported its first case.

Natrona County has 6 cases with multiple cases also in Carbon and Sheridan counties.

Additionally, Albany, Campbell, Park and Sweetwater have reported one confirmed case each.

As of 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 26, the Wyoming Public Health Laboratory completed 865 tests for COVID-19. There are 239 tests reported by commercial labs, though negative test results are not reported consistently. The Centers for Disease Control completed one test.

(Commercial labs are required to report positive test results to WDH; negative results are not reported consistently.)

State Orders

Governor Mark Gordon has supported a statewide order issued by the state health officer prohibiting gatherings of 10 people or more in a single room or confined space. The order does provide some exemptions.

The order supplements a statewide order issued March 19 that closed bars, restaurants, theaters, gymnasiums, some child care facilities and schools. Many restaurants remain open with carry out, delivery and drive thru service only.

The state of Wyoming issued an order to close all non-essential personal services. The closure applies to cosmetology services including nail salons and barber shops. It will also affect massage parlors, tattoo, body art and piercing shops. The order begins Wednesday, March 25, and lasts until April 3.

The prohibition does not apply to gatherings at private residences, hotels and motels for lodging purposes, government facilities and businesses, grocery stores and retail or business establishments that can provide adequate social distance spacing of 6 feet or more. Healthcare facilities are also exempt, as are long-term care and assisted living facilities that are complying with Wyoming Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control directives.

Wyoming Public Media would like to thank and recognize all health care workers, doctors, nurses and care givers during the global pandemic.

News & Updates:

Resources:

Do you have specific questions about the virus in Wyoming, you or your family’s health, what this means for your job, your home and your town's economy? Please submit them here and we'll do our best to report the information you need.

We also want to hear from you on how your community is responding. Tell us what you're seeing, hearing and experiencing in your neighborhood, grocery store and beyond.

On social media, use the hashtag #COVID19WY.

Ways to Connect

Loring Schaible

One of Fremont County's nine confirmed COVID-19 patients went to SageWest Health Care in Lander last week, but was sent home without being tested for the disease. That's according to the patient's daughter, who said her mother began showing symptoms, including a severe cough, that same week. 

Charles Willgren via https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wyoming has risen to 19. Those cases are spread between Sheridan, Fremont, Park, Laramie and Teton Counties.

Amid the COVID-19 epidemic, blood drives on campuses and corporate offices across the Mountain West have been cancelled. That's led to a "severe blood shortage."

The fact that the novel coronavirus appeared in the middle of flu season has prompted inevitable comparisons. Is COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, pretty much similar to the flu or does it pose a far greater threat?

Although there are still many unknowns about COVID-19, there is some solid information from researchers that sheds light on some of the similarities and differences at this time.

Symptoms

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

U.S. taxpayers will have a three-month extension to file their taxes because of the coronavirus pandemic, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday.

He said that at the president's direction, "we are moving Tax Day from April 15 to July 15."

"All taxpayers and businesses will have this additional time to file and make payments without interest or penalties," Mnuchin added.

At the same time, he encouraged people who are set to receive refunds to file earlier so that they can get their money more quickly.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

The White House sought to show that it's in control of the sprawling coronavirus crisis on Friday even as it acknowledged enduring shortfalls in key supplies.

Administration officials also said they're imposing new controls on travel and restricting passage through the northern border with Canada and the southern border with Mexico following agreements with those governments.

Here were some key points from the latest briefing.

Too few tests

As the Mountain West braces for more coronavirus cases, one community service has become even more vital: Meals on Wheels.

Downtown Laramie
Nyttend

The Wyoming State Health Officer, with the support of Governor Mark Gordon, found it's necessary to close public spaces for a two-week period in order to slow the spread of COVID-19.

President Trump signed a second coronavirus emergency aid package into law Wednesday evening, after it passed with overwhelming support from the Senate.

The legislation follows a first emergency funding bill, which allocated roughly $8 billion for coronavirus prevention, preparation and response efforts.

As Americans shift their lives indoors and away from large public gatherings, people across the U.S. are grappling with basic questions about life, work and social distancing in the age of COVID-19.

Schools have shut down or pivoted to online learning, restaurants have halted dine-in services, and businesses across the nation have altered their work hours or shuttered completely. NPR checked in this week, with residents of three U.S. cities that have been among the first to face high numbers of cases and restrictions related to the outbreak.

The Interior Department has announced it’s temporarily waiving entrance fees for recreation areas, national monuments and national parks. Secretary David Bernhardt said he wanted to make it easier for people to recreate on public lands.

People infected with the coronavirus can spread it easily, even if they're not yet experiencing severe symptoms of the disease, according to virologists watching the pandemic unfold in Europe.

Wyoming Public Radio

Ultra Petroleum Corp., Wyoming's largest natural gas producer in 2019, agreed to additional one-time bonuses to six executives totaling $1,561,250.

Special hours for seniors to shop are just one of the ways grocery stores across the U.S. are adjusting their operations during the coronavirus pandemic.

Supermarkets are restricting their opening hours to give workers time for cleaning and restocking. They're also limiting how many items people are allowed to buy. And they're adding special designated hours when only seniors and others most vulnerable to the coronavirus are invited to shop.

Vasiliymeshko / Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)

There are 18 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wyoming as of Thursday, March 19, spread between Sheridan, Fremont, Park, Laramie and Teton Counties.

Update 3/18/20 at 3 p.m.: Sleeping Giant announced on its Facebook page Wednesday afternoon, March 18, that it will close.

"Due to new information and the most recent update from the Park County Health Officer, Sleeping Giant Ski Area has decided to suspend operations for the remainder of the season. This decision was not made lightly, but we must put the health of the community first. Please keep yourself and your loved ones safe. Thank you for your continued support, have an enjoyable summer and hope to see you next winter." 

As of this time Anteloppe Butte lifts remain open six days a week and all food operations are closed. 

FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Grocery store shelves across our state are empty due to stockpiling and panic-buying. Many grocers are responding by making special accommodations for the elderly, immunocompromised, and others at high risk during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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