Coronavirus In Wyoming: Resources & News

Wyoming Public Media is here to keep you current on the news surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. 

Updated 7/31/20 at 3:30 p.m.

There are a total of 2,726 confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 in Wyoming with 603 active cases. On Friday, there were 37 new confirmed cases across 14 of Wyoming's 23 counties.

Here are the numbers of lab-confirmed cases broken down by county: Fremont County 411; Laramie 320; Teton 296; Sweetwater 226; Uinta 207; Natrona 182; Park 104; Campbell 92; Albany 76; Lincoln 65; Carbon 54; Washakie 43; Sheridan 40; Big Horn 31; Sublette 24; Converse 19; Johnson 18; Hot Springs 15; Goshen 12; Crook nine; Weston five; Platte four; Niobrara county has one case.

The Wyoming Department of Health reports that 2,123 lab-confirmed and probable cases have recovered across the state. More than 77,000 tests have been completed statewide.

(Commercial labs are required to report positive test results to WDH; negative results are not reported consistently.)

Governor Mark Gordon's Press Briefings

Press Conference on COVID-19, July 28, 2020

State Orders -- Updated July 28, 2020

The Wyoming State Health Officer has issued the following public health orders:

Statewide Gatherings

On June 16, the Wyoming Department of Health announced it will now allow in-person visits at long-term care facilities, but under specific guidelines. Visits will only take place in a designated outdoor space, and will be limited to two visitors at a time. Also, visitors will be screened for COVID-19 symptoms, and they’ll have to wear a face covering, while staff and residents will need to wear a surgical face mask. Additionally, a facility staff member trained in patient safety and infection control measures must remain with the resident at all times during the visit. As facilities decide whether or not to allow visits, WDH is asking them to consider local conditions.

The Wyoming State Health Officer has issued the following public health orders:

On March 27, Gov. Mark Gordon made further changes to his orders regarding public gatherings. The governor's updated orders allow for outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people to occur after June 1, with social distancing and increased sanitization measures in place.

On May 15, many restrictions under the above public health orders were eased. Restaurants may offer outdoor and indoor dining under certain guidelines, including but not limited to: staff that come within six feet of customers or other staff must wear face coverings; tables must be at least six feet apart; and tables must be limited to groups of six people, preferably of the same household.

The new public health orders also ease certain restrictions to other public gathering areas, including gyms, salons, movie theatres, performance venues, as well as churches, faith-based organizations, and funeral homes. For more details to each of the restrictions, please see links to public health orders above.

State Parks campgrounds were opened on May 15 for Wyoming residents only.

The prohibition does not apply to gatherings at private residences, hotels and motels for lodging purposes, government facilities and businesses, grocery stores and retail or business establishments that can provide adequate social distance spacing of 6 feet or more. Healthcare facilities are also exempt, as are long-term care and assisted living facilities that are complying with Wyoming Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control directives.

Wyoming Public Media would like to thank and recognize all health care workers, doctors, nurses caregivers, grocery store workers, truck drivers, and delivery workers during the global pandemic.

News & Updates:

Resources:

Do you have specific questions about the virus in Wyoming, you or your family’s health, what this means for your job, your home and your town's economy? Please submit them here and we'll do our best to report the information you need.

We also want to hear from you on how your community is responding. Tell us what you're seeing, hearing and experiencing in your neighborhood, grocery store and beyond.

On social media, use the hashtag #COVID19WY.

Ways to Connect

Aina Farid Shah

When the University of Wyoming announced that it will resume in-person classes and re-open campus in the fall, international student Aina Farid Shah was worried. "At first I was shocked, because, isn't that unsafe?" she said.

This story was powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

Nearly two-thirds of residents in the Mountain West believe Trump isn't doing a good job handling the pandemic, according to a survey from researchers at Harvard, Rutgers, Northeastern and Northwestern universities released Tuesday.

 


Screenshot: https://twitter.com/GovernorGordon/status/1280618114661658629

In recent weeks, new cases of COVID-19 have been on the rise in Wyoming. On Monday, July 6, the state saw its largest single day increase since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic: 37 new confirmed cases.

Care19

Contact tracing is one of the most difficult aspects of fighting COVID-19, but a new state-backed app could assist Wyoming officials in that effort.

Millions of Americans have been relocated due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a recent survey from the Pew Research Center.

The survey, conducted in early June, shows that 22% of Americans either have moved or know someone who has because of the pandemic. That translates to more than 72 million people.

There’s significant evidence that the novel coronavirus can spread through tiny particles that linger in the air. Thanks to a University of Colorado chemistry professor, now there’s a free tool to measure those risks.

stjohnsfoundation.health

St. John’s Medical Center in Jackson Hole is raising prices for inpatient and outpatient services.

The eight percent increase was approved by St. John's Health's board of trustees in an effort to align prices with similar Mountain West medical facilities. Chief Financial Officer John Kren said the hospital has raised prices over the past couple of years. 

Allan Henderson

The University of Wyoming Board of Trustees has approved a plan to reopen campus this fall, but some classes will still be taught online.


Dr. Bret Frey is an emergency room physician in Reno, Nevada, and he likens working in health care right now to fighting in a war. 

"I always thought that there was a good chance that World War III would happen in some form in my lifetime, I just didn't appreciate it was going to come in the form of a virus," Frey says.

The voting process has long disenfranchised Native American communities. With the COVID-19 pandemic and mail-in voting exacerbating the problem, U.S. senators in the Mountain West and across the country are asking the federal government to make sure voters in Indian Country can cast ballots come November.

Researchers have released a new guide for parents about how to keep their kids from being recruited by extremists online.

 

For some people of faith, gathering together is a central tenet of church. You bolster each other's beliefs, sing communally and feel the transcendence of the moment.

Daniel Foster/Flickr / Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

If you receive a call threatening to shut off your power, Rocky Mountain Power wants you to know it's not them calling - no matter what the caller ID says.

The electric company's customers across Wyoming, Idaho and Utah have been reporting the fraudulent activity, which has affected both residential and business customers.

Kamila Kudelska

With the Fourth of July holiday weekend fast approaching, Park County health officials are worried because of a recent surge in COVID-19 cases.

Well into June, Park County had just two cases of COVID-19. But over the last week and a half, that number quickly jumped to nearly 50 cases.

Leonard J. DeFrancisci via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Park County's tourism numbers are slowly increasing as the state reopens.

Yellowstone National Park kept its gates closed until mid-May and both of its entrances in Wyoming opened for day use only.

Park County Travel Council Executive Director Claudia Wade said since then Cody and the county have seen a steady increase of tourists but nothing like what was originally predicted.

Wyoming Department of Health - State of Wyoming

Wyoming continues to see new COVID-19 cases at a very high rate, and it has some officials nervous as the fourth of July weekend looms. State Health Officer Alexia Harrist said at a news conference that people need to social distance and start wearing face coverings in order to stop the surge.

She said it's becoming clear what factors have driven the numbers up.

Savannah Maher

 

Fremont County, which continues to lead the state in confirmed COVID-19 cases, will be without a public health officer until August. Dr. Brian Gee chose to step down from the job after his term ended on Tuesday.

According to County Commission Chairman Travis Becker, the COVID-19 pandemic abruptly turned the public health officer position from a relatively casual role to an 80-hour per week commitment.

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