Women

Pedigree Stage Stop Race

The Pedigree Stage Stop Race in Jackson is the biggest dog sled race in the lower 48 states. This year, for the first time ever, women took the event's top three spots.

Mary Beth Coyne


Last February, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort launched a new extreme skiing and snowboarding competition. 18 men and seven women competed to be crowned the King and Queen of Corbet's. At the awards ceremony, the top male won $5,000 more than the top female finisher. The incident drew attention to the fact that there's nothing in place to guarantee equal prizes in big mountain freeskiing.

Wyoming House for Historic Women

In 2019, Wyoming will mark 150 years of women’s suffrage in the state – half a century before the U.S. ratified the 19th amendment. To honor the occasion, the Wyoming Office of Tourism has announced a new campaign called the “Year of Wyoming Women.”

The University of Wyoming has a new recruitment campaign featuring the slogan "The World Needs More Cowboys." It rolled out with a video and new advertising materials, but some on campus are not happy about it. Christine Porter is a professor of community and public health, and says the slogan excludes women and people of color. Helen Raleigh is a Chinese-American UW alum. She also writes for the conservative publication The Federalist, and recently published an article supporting the new slogan.

Vicki Christiansen was sworn in this morning as Chief of the U.S. Forest Service. She’s only the second female to serve in this role in its 113-year history.

The 2018 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report commissioned by American Express

Wyoming is ranked 42nd in the nation for growth of women-owned businesses since 2007, with a 22 percent increase in that time. That’s compared to a 58 percent increase of women-owned businesses nationwide. But Wyoming still ranks in the top ten for women’s businesses that employ large numbers of people.

The 2018 midterms could be the year of the woman and possibly the independent as well - especially in Colorado.

The Modern West 35: Forgotten Women Of The West

Jun 21, 2018

From washing the army’s clothes to solving murders, three authors tell the stories of strong Western women.

Wyoming Secretary of State's Office

Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, Secretary of State Ed Buchanan, and the Wyoming Department of Transportation will designate a 19 mile stretch of Highway 28 in Fremont County as the "Wyoming Women's Suffrage Pathway."

Kamila Kudelska

Last week the Wyoming Archaeological Society and the Montana Archaeological Society held a joint conference in Billings, Montana. Three years ago, women archaeologists from both Wyoming and Montana started a group called The Sisterhood of the Traveling Trowel.

The group tries to help emerging women archaeologists in their careers. Crystal Allegria and Bonnie Smith are both members of the sisterhood and archaeologists in the Plains Country. Wyoming Public Radio’s Kamila Kudelska speaks with both women on the need to help women archaeologists. Kudelska first asked Bonnie Smith what the group’s goal was this year. 

The famous aviator first visited Wyoming in 1934. She traveled to Meeteetse for summer break where she stayed on local guide Carl Dunrud’s dude ranch. Earhart fell in love with the region right away. 

University of Wyoming

If your name is John, you’re more likely to run a large company or be a politician than if you’re a woman with any name. That’s according to the latest "Glass Ceiling Index" by the New York Times. So does this under-representation hold true in our region’s so-called "Equality State"?

The Modern West 33: Women In Wyoming, Part 2

Apr 17, 2018
Neltje on her ranch in Banner, Wyoming.
LINDSAY LINTON BUK

More conversations from the series Women in Wyoming…about pushing boundaries and redefining what it means to live in the modern West. Featuring Neltje and Affie Ellis.

The Modern West 32: Women In Wyoming, Part 1

Mar 27, 2018
Nina (left) with her mother, Nimi (right) at Nimi's home in Casper, Wyoming.
LINDSAY LINTON BUK

Conversations from the series Women in Wyoming…about pushing boundaries and redefining what it means to live in the modern West. Featuring Nimi and Nina McConigley.

Mayor Grace Miller, third from left, and the Jackson Town Council, 1921.
Wyoming Tales and Trails.

The National Elk Refuge is commemorating the role of women in American conservation for Women’s History Month with an exhibit at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center. The temporary exhibit includes a timeline of Jackson Hole women who played a vital role in the area, including Grace Miller, the town's mayor who presided over an all-female town council from 1920 to 1923. 

Wyoming State Historical Society

The Wyoming House passed a bill to create a day commemorating Estelle Reel. She was the first woman elected to a statewide office in 1894, as the Superintendent of Public Instruction.  

 

While the majority of lawmakers wanted to recognize Reel’s accomplishment, House Minority Leader Cathy Connolly said Reel’s discriminatory attitude toward Native Americans and women should make them think twice.

 

Connolly said she researched Reel and read multiple articles.

 

Andrew Burr

This past weekend was the 20th Cody Ice Climbing Festival. The festival is a weekend long featuring nightly speakers and ice clinics. Angela Vanwiemeersch, a professional ice climber, has been climbing for over five years. As a woman, she teaches many all women classes. She spoke with Wyoming Public Radio’s Kamila Kudelska about how she got introduced to ice climbing and how the sport is becoming more attractive for women.

Maggie Mullen

Women’s March Wyoming organizers are working to ensure safety after a potentially threatening comment was left on a Facebook post about the Cheyenne march. The comment referenced “claymores” and “c4” – types of explosives – saying they would come in handy at a march.

Graphics from SANS. Altered by Tennessee Watson

Jobs in cybersecurity are in high demand, and Governor Matt Mead is encouraging young people in Wyoming to explore the field, especially young women.

 

The governor has announced Wyoming will now participate in the “High School Girls CyberStart Challenge” — a cybersecurity competition for junior and seniors in the form of an online game. In the simulation, players are cyber agents responsible for protecting a base. The idea is to get girls interested in the cybersecurity field, where women are generally underrepresented.

 

Wyoming Humanities

The artwork of 31 of the Middle East's premier contemporary women artists is coming to Jackson. “I AM” is an international traveling exhibit focusing on the contributions that Middle Eastern women make to local and global culture, and movements for peace and harmony.  

It’s already made stops in Jordan, London and Washington DC, and will open at the Center for the Arts in Jackson on Friday evening.

 

Wyoming House for Historic Women

Wyoming is rapidly approaching its 150th anniversary of granting women the right to vote – the first government in the world to do so unconditionally.

The new podcast and photography series Women in Wyoming profiles accomplished women living in the Equality State. Its creator photographer Lindsay Linton Buk grew up in Powell thinking that in order to be successful in life she would eventually have to leave the state.

UW College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Women engineers face a lot of challenges, some of which begin as early as their college education, where they are highly outnumbered by their male peers in the classroom.

To address this disparity, the University of Wyoming has launched a new mentoring program, that pairs female engineering undergraduates with female alumni working in the field. Wyoming Public Radio’s Maggie Mullen spoke with Teddi Freedman, a Senior Coordinator for UW’s College of Engineering that is heading up the new program.

Bob Beck

Earlier this month Callie Mae Bishop was crowned Miss Wyoming USA. The Casper native had sought the title for a number of years.

In real life, Bishop is a yoga instructor, rock climber, and serves beer, in other words the perfect Miss Wyoming. She told Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck that the victory is a dream come true. 

Wyoming Women's Antelope Hunt

In 2013, when the Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt was launched, it was the first of its kind in the country. Since then, it has grown and now includes more hunters than ever.

During the second weekend in October, first-time female hunters will pair up with an experienced mentor in hopes of harvesting an antelope on the Ucross Ranch east of Buffalo.

The Hilde Project

A Laramie organization that teaches women to sew, knit and crochet is holding a crowdfunding campaign to raise enough money to stay open for another year. The Hilde Project teaches classes in sewing, knitting and crocheting to give women a marketable skill.

Bren Lieskie, an instructor at The Hilde Project, said these days knitting and sewing are almost ancient arts.

Photo by Sarah Mirk with use under Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Following the presidential election, family planning centers in Wyoming experienced a sharp increase in women seeking long-term contraceptives. Recently, that’s begun to slow down. Now, concern from the centers is about around funding and healthcare access.

 

Planned Parenthood clinics across the country saw an unprecedented rise in donations following the election, mainly because of threats to its future funding.

 

She's A Runner Girl

Across the country, women outnumber men at the finish lines of running events, and in Laramie, the number of young girls who run is on the rise.

Close to 100 girls will participate in Laramie’s Hapi-ness 5k this year. They are participants in She’s A Runner Girl, a program that physically and mentally prepares girls to complete a 3.1-mile run.

A second grader named Ada said she likes running with all girls. "Because there are no boys to make you sad or anything."

Melodie Edwards

On July 3, 2013, 21-year-old Northern Cheyenne member Hannah Harris left her baby with her mom and went out. Hours later, she still hadn’t come back to breastfeed her child. The police investigation was slow to start a search and the family was forced to rely on word of mouth and social media. Still, it was five days before Harris was found, brutally beaten and raped, her body thrown in a ditch. 

Native Women's Society of the Great Plains

On February 12, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution designating a day of awareness for missing and murdered Native women on May 5, the birthday of Hanna Harris, a 21-year-old Northern Cheyenne woman who disappeared in 2013.

Carmen O’Leary, director of the Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains, said the resolution was passed in Harris' name.

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