tariffs

Drew Eggers stood at the edge of one of his stubble fields when he plucked a patch of mint left over from harvest.

“You can smell the spearmint,” he said, offering it up for a sniff.


A new trade deal with Japan could soon help out dairymen, cattlemen, corn and wheat farmers, among many others.


The Rhodium Group

Since 2016, Chinese foreign direct investment (FDI) in the U.S. has plunged by 90 percent. That includes things like tech, agriculture and real estate-all drivers in the region's economy. But that dip isn't being felt in our region, yet.

Seven Mile Hill Wind Farm in Carbon County
Cooper McKim

Wind power expansion in our region could soon face a new challenge. The International Trade Commission is considering a tariff on wind turbines. Domestic manufacturers argue several countries are selling turbines below fair prices, undercutting the U.S. industry.

If you’re in the market for a new tent or fleece jacket, you could see prices for those products go up. The Trump Administration is proposing new tariffs on items like these that are produced in China.

 


Increased tariffs on Chinese goods will ‘devastate’ outdoor recreation companies, an industry group warned in a letter sent to President Trump Wednesday.

Where’s the beef? Not in China.

President Trump’s escalating trade beef with China has frozen plans to sell more Montana steaks, hamburgers and jerky to Chinese consumers.

The second round of payments to farmers affected by President Trump’s trade war with China will soon get sent out. The application deadline for growers is Jan. 15.

But the bulk of that money is largely skipping our region.


The outdoor recreation industry makes up an important part of the Mountain West economy and it’s feeling relieved right now after President Trump and President Xi of China have agreed to pause their escalating trade wars for now.  

The ongoing trade war with China is feeling close to home these days. Mounting tariffs on outdoor recreation gear may hit the wallets of folks in the Mountain West who love going outside.

On Monday, the Trump administration announced $200 billion dollars worth of new tariffs on products from China.

“This is going to include backpacks, sport bags, leather ski gloves, bikes and some camping equipment,” Rich Harper, a trade analyst with the lobbying group Outdoor Industry Association, said.

Cooper McKim


On Laramie's western edge, TNT Motorsports is lined with dirt bikes, Sea-Doo watercrafts, and gear with neon and flashy patterns. Yamaha and Fox logos hang on the wall as a yellow-shirted customer eyes the latest YZ 450 dirt bike.

United States Department of Agriculture

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue was in Wyoming as part of a tour of the Mountain West. Secretary Perdue Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck that he is getting a lot of feedback from producers over tariff and trade issues and how that might hurt Wyoming producers.

National Park Service

Japan is considering hitting back against the U.S. in retaliation for America's steel and aluminum tariffs. A Japanese levy could hurt our region's agricultural industry.

The Chinese government has retaliated in what appears to be an escalating trade war. The government says it will slap tariffs on a long list of American goods including pork and fruit, a move that could put producers across the region in a bind.

China buys a lot of American pork. And while Iowa may be this country’s pig-producing colossus, tariffs would hit producers everywhere, including states in the Mountain West like Utah and Colorado.