National Monuments

Public lands that used to be a part of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah will lose many of their environmental protections, according to a final federal government management plan released Friday.

No new oil and gas leases. No more shrinking monuments. Free entrance to national parks.

A new study says when the Trump administration shrank Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument in Utah late last year, it may have endangered scores of native bee species.

A historic election near Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah faces a legal challenge as Republicans have appealed a federal judge’s earlier ruling that allowed the eventual winner to be on the ballot.

A new environmental assessment by the National Park Service proposes improvements to the infrastructure surrounding Devils Tower National Monument. The plan would bring the visitors center and Tower Trail up to modern accessibility standards.

A judge ruled Monday that a federal court in Washington, D.C. — not Salt Lake City — will decide whether it was legal for the Trump administration to shrink two national monuments in southern Utah.

The Bureau of Land Management has issued draft proposals outlining the uses the federal government wants to allow in the Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears national monuments in southern Utah.

Separate bills are active in Congress to alternately strengthen or weaken the law used to create national monuments.

The Department of the Interior is outlining steps aimed at increasing energy production on federal lands. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says boosting production of resources like oil and gas creates jobs and enhances the nation’s energy security.

Jackson Hole’s annual SHIFT Festival kicked off this week with Native American leaders defending Bears Ears National Monument. Each year, SHIFT gathers outdoor enthusiasts from around the nation. This year, Native American leaders took center stage.

Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office

A dedication ceremony is set for Saturday, July 8 at the Ames Monument in southeastern Wyoming. It was listed as a National Historic Landmark last November. 

Bobbie Barrasso will act as Master of Ceremonies, while her husband U.S. Senator John Barrasso will be in attendance alongside Governor Matt Mead and U.S. Representative Liz Cheney.

Completed in 1880, the monument was built in honor of Oaks and Oliver Ames—two brothers who helped to finance the Union Pacific Railroad.

Fossil Butte National Monument

Aug 15, 2016
Fossil Butte National Monument

Fossil Butte National Monument preserves one of the richest fossil deposits in the world. Fifty two million year old fish, insects, birds, mammals, reptiles, and plants are nearly perfectly preserved in limestone.

Visitor center exhibits include over 300 fossils featuring a thirteen-foot crocodilian, the oldest complete bats and a mass mortality of 356 fish. Also, enjoy two video programs, interactive exhibits, and a book store.