Mosquitoes

Beth.herlin via Wikipedia Commons

A Campbell County woman caught the Zika virus while traveling outside the country, and after her return started showing symptoms like fever, rash and joint paint. Department of Health spokeswoman Kim Deti says Wyoming was one of the last states to report a case.

The virus spreads through a certain type of mosquito, but Deti says those mosquitos cannot survive in Wyoming.

Phil, CDC

Cities and towns across Wyoming have begun mosquito prevention efforts. Fogging and spraying are underway to kill adult mosquitos, and larvicide is being applied to areas of standing water like wheat fields and ponds.

Keith Wardlaw, the mosquito crew supervisor for the city of Laramie, said areas that have seen lots of rain and snowmelt, like Southeast and Central Wyoming, may also see more mosquitos this summer.

“We’ve had a very wet spring. There’s certainly a lot of habitat available right now for mosquitos to be produced in,” said Wardlaw.

Wikimedia Commons

According to the Wyoming Department of Health, the Zika Virus should have little to no presence in Wyoming this summer.

There have been 618 cases of Zika in the United States reported to the Centers for Disease Control over the past year.

The virus is linked to the birth defect microcephaly, a condition where babies are born with smaller-than-average heads and underdeveloped brains.

With snow in the forecast, you’re probably not thinking much about mosquitoes. But the Laramie City Council is.

Laramie Beekeeper Helen Coates says last July, after the city sprayed organophosphates--a powerful common insecticide-- on the fields surrounding the city, she found hundreds of dead bees outside her hive. She says the chemical may be the cheapest approach, but it’s the worst for the environment.

“If you go spray, for example, a field of blooming yellow clover, you’re going to kill all the pollinators, probably some birds, it’s toxic to fish, etc.”