matt mead

Ambre Energy

Oregon has shut down Wyoming’s attempt to force the permitting of a coal export terminal in that state.

The Oregon Department of State Lands rejected Ambre Energy’s application for a permit to build a coal transfer terminal in August, citing concerns about the impact on nearby tribal fisheries. The terminal would allow Powder River Basin coal to be shipped to Asia.

The Wyoming Board of Education supports making the state’s schools chief an appointed position instead of an elected one, as the Wyoming Constitution currently requires.

After hours of deliberation Thursday, all but one Board member voiced support for making such changes to the office of State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The Board was split on whether the Governor or the Board itself should be responsible for appointing a state Superintendent.

Due to the summer, turnout may not be high during today’s primary election. That will mean that fewer people will decide some key races. 

One of the hotly contested races involves Governor Matt Mead and challengers Taylor Haynes and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill. University of Wyoming Political Scientist Jim King said the governor needs his supporters to vote.

“The concern I would think in the Mead camp right now would be making sure that people don’t just assume that everything is fine and find something else to do that day.”

Tuesday is Wyoming’s primary election and while it’s not that unusual for incumbent legislative candidates to have contested races, this year several top elected officials will also have to fend off challengers.

Aaron Schrank/WPR

Advocates for gay marriage in Wyoming delivered more than 2,300 signed petitions to the Capitol Tuesday, urging Governor Matt Mead and Attorney General Peter Michael to stop defending the state’s gay marriage ban in court.

Stephanie Joyce

Governor Matt Mead may be changing his mind when it comes to expanding Medicaid services for low income people in the state. After publicly rejecting the notion of Medicaid expansion late last year, the governor says he is negotiating in good faith with the federal department of Health and Human Services to develop a Wyoming specific Medicaid expansion plan. 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released its final version of a plan to reduce atmospheric haze by cutting emissions from coal-fired power plants in Wyoming.

EPA officials say the plan will improve visibility across wide-open spaces while protecting natural resources and local economies which depend on recreation.

They say the 714-page document adopts most of a separate plan proposed by Wyoming environmental regulators.

Wyoming attracts another gun product business

Jan 3, 2014

Gun magazine manufacturer Magpul Industries is leaving Colorado and moving part of its operation to Cheyenne. 

The company announced that it is leaving Colorado because of the passage of a number of new gun restrictions.  Its production, distribution and shipping operations will move to Cheyenne.  Governor Matt Mead says he and other Wyoming officials started speaking with Magpul a year ago.

Democrats push for Medicaid expansion

Dec 9, 2013

Two Democratic members of the legislature’s Joint Appropriations Committee criticized Governor Mead’s decision not to expand Medicaid Services. 

At today’s/Monday’s meeting, Senator John Hastert said Mead’s dislike of the Affordable Care Act has nothing to do with expanding Medicaid and helping Wyoming’s poor get insurance. 

Representative Ken Esquibel noted that despite concerns with the A-C-A, other states are having great success with Medicaid expansion.  He urged Mead to keep an open mind and review those successes.

While some states are considering using their own money to open national parks and help underfunded federal programs which are struggling due to the federal shutdown…Wyoming will not participate.  

Governor Matt Mead says there is no doubt that the federal shutdown has far reaching implications, but his spokesman, Renny MacKay, says the state has no intention of spending state money on federal programs.            

State agencies say they continue to work on contingency plans in case key programs run out of money.

Governor Matt Mead says he trusts the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality to deliver trustworthy results when it takes over the Pavillion water contamination study from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A draft of the study initiated by the EPA was released in 2011 and tentatively linked groundwater contamination with fracking, something industry expressed skepticism about.

Mead says he’s not sure yet whether the state study will be peer reviewed once it’s completed.

Gov. Matt Mead has named Peter Michael to serve as interim Wyoming Attorney General.

Michael replaces former AG Greg Phillips, who was sworn in on Monday as a judge on the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. Michael had served as deputy attorney general for Phillips.

Mead says Michael is an excellent attorney. Mead says he's confident Michael will lead the Attorney General's Office in a steady and capable manner until he can find a permanent replacement for Phillips.

NEW ED DIRECTOR - Gov. Matt Mead has selected an Arizona state senator to run the Wyoming Education Department.

Mead late Wednesday afternoon announced his choice of Richard Crandall, who co-owns two nutritional service companies.

The Education Department has a budget of about $1 billion a year and employs about 150 people.

Governor Matt Mead says the Republican Central Committee acted too hastily when it approved a resolution endorsing a petition drive to repeal the state law that removed powers from State Superintendent Cindy Hill. Several members of the committee also wanted three Republican legislators who were instrumental in passing the law to leave the party. Mead says a court challenge to the law will be heard by the Supreme Court and the Wyoming Attorney General’s office is also concluding an investigation into how the Department was run in Superintendent Hill’s first two years in office.

Mead concerned about more federal cuts

May 3, 2013

Wyoming is scheduled to lose 53 million dollars in federal mineral royalties this summer along with other federal dollars due to the sequester. 

Governor Matt Mead says higher than expected gas prices and other earnings will allow the state to overcome that loss of revenue.  But during a news conference with reporters, Mead said that he will be worried if these federal cuts continue.

The Wyoming Republican Party Central Committee has approved a resolution endorsing the drive to repeal the state law that took power away from the state superintendent of public instruction.

The Central Committee approved the resolution on a 40-32 vote over the weekend in Buffalo.

The action is a slap at the Republican controlled state Legislature and Republican Gov. Matt Mead who approved the law during this past legislative session.

Top Wyoming officials say congressional action to block about $700 million in federal Abandoned Mine Land payments to the state over the next 10 years threatens to be devastating to the state budget.
 
Gov. Matt Mead and Sen. Phil Nicholas, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee in the Wyoming Legislature, say the loss will leave the state hard-pressed to continue to pay for coal research and other programs it has covered with the AML dollars.

Gov. Matt Mead says it’s taking longer than he expected to develop an energy policy for Wyoming.

Mead wanted to have a draft energy policy finished this summer, but he says it’s taking a long time to gather input from all interested parties, including conservation groups, ag groups and the energy industry. Still, he says the finished product will be worth the wait.

“Rather than being reactive and engaging in lawsuits and court battles, let’s work together to find a consensus on where we should go with energy development in the state,” the governor said.

       Wyoming Governor Matt Mead and a delegation of state officials will tout Wyoming’s coal and abundant energy resources in China this week.  The group is attending the 2012 International advanced Coal Technologies Conference.  Governor Mead says this could turn out to be an important trip.

“This is a big enough issue, that is coal and energy to Wyoming, that collectively we all need to see what others have done and see if we can take back some good ideas.”

A panel of Wyoming legislators has voted to deny Gov. Matt Mead's request to use state money to make up for expired federal stimulus funds that had gone to help support the Medicaid program.

A majority of members of the Joint Appropriations Committee voted against Mead's request to give the Health Department and extra $37 million for Medicaid today.

The committee also voted against Mead's request to put up nearly $7 million to cut waiting lists for people in the state waiting for services for developmental disabilities and acquired brain injuries.

Governor Matt Mead is wrapping up a trip to Texas where he's been meeting with officials of some of the nation's largest energy companies to try to drum up support for the University of Wyoming's School of Energy Resources.

Renny MacKay is spokesman for Mead in Cheyenne. MacKay says Mead and UW officials have been in Houston and Dallas since Tuesday.

MacKay says they've been meeting with representatives from such energy firms as Exxon, Mobil and Marathon Oil Corp. He says Mead is due back in Wyoming on Wednesday afternoon.

Governor Matt Mead is once again urging the U-S Postal Service of resist cutting some of Wyoming’s Post Offices.  Mead says rural Post Offices are an important source of commerce and communication for rural areas and he’s urging the Postal Service to find other ways to deal with its budget woes.