Mammoth

Kamila Kudelska

Thousands of years ago, Wyoming was home to mammoths. Archeologists have been studying interactions between the first humans and last mammoths in the state. One archeologist is the University of Wyoming department head of anthropology Todd Surovell. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska chatted with Surovell about what he believes caused the extinction of mammoths.

The Modern West 49: Archaeology And Fossils, Part 1

Jun 5, 2019
COURTESY OF DENVER MUSEUM OF NATURE & SCIENCE

How archaeologists are trying to track down the remaining pieces of a mammoth found in Wyoming.

Todd A. Surovell

University of Wyoming anthropologists are putting out a call out for help looking for a lost mammoth. How do you lose a six-ton extinct animal that lived 13,000 years ago? Well, you find a few of its bones but lose track over the decades of exactly where they were found. But now some clues have come to the surface. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards sat down with the University of Wyoming anthropology professor Todd Surovell, the detective trying to put all the clues together. 

B. SMITH VIA FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Ancient mammoth remains were recently found near Cody on the shoreline of the Buffalo Bill Reservoir. Portions of ribs, vertebrae and other bones are believed to all be part of the same extinct mammal.