Latino Resource Center

Credit Zach Montes

A visit by immigration officials to Jackson this month put many in the town’s immigrant community on edge.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement came to Jackson to find and arrest five undocumented men that met the federal government’s enforcement priorities.

Zach Montes

Last November, President Obama announced a major executive action on immigration—a plan that would offer temporary legal status and deportation relief to millions of immigrants who live in the country without documents. That’s big news for residents of Jackson. In the past few decades, the town’s Latino immigrant population has skyrocketed from basically zero—to about 30 percent of the community. As Wyoming Public Radio’s Aaron Schrank reports, these changes to immigration law could bring new opportunities to Jackson’s working class immigrants—and the employers who hire them.

Mexico's consul general for Utah and Wyoming, Eduardo Arnal Palomera, made a rare visit to Jackson this month. He held a public forum, chatted with some of the 180 people lined up to renew Mexican passports and IDs and also met with town and county officials.

Latino Resource Center Executive Director Sonia Capece says the visit was a big deal.