insects

Stephen Ausmus, USDA ARS

The Western Bumble Bee Working Group published a study that found the probability of finding a western bumblebee decreased by 93% from 1998 to 2018. The study, published in Ecosphere, explained that this may be because of changes in habitat, climate, and pressures from disease, pesticides, and other animals.

Ben Sale

If you're dealing with a miller moth invasion in your home or backyard, you're not alone. People from Colorado to Montana have noticed a larger number of the moths than usual this year.

Yasunori Koide via Wikimedia Commons ( Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International)

An invasive species of insect, commonly referred to as the "murder hornet," has been spotted in Washington state and British Columbia. Its actual name is the Asian giant hornet and it's known to decimate whole hives of honeybees.

Invasive insects and diseases are killing tree species in forests across the U.S., and in turn, weakening one of the planet's natural ways to fight climate change. That's according to a new report published in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The Environmental Protection Agency is expanding the use of an insecticide that is toxic to bees. The move affects more than 17 million acres of farmland in our region.

 


There’s evidence that bee and butterfly populations are in decline, a phenomenon that some have dubbed the “insect apocalypse.” In response, the Colorado Department of Transportation has brought in a bug expert.

Monarch butterflies in the West have hit a record low, according to a conservation group that tracks their numbers.

A new study says when the Trump administration shrank Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument in Utah late last year, it may have endangered scores of native bee species.

thinkwy.org

Two professors from the University of Wyoming have created an original opera about the story of an unusual subject; the Rocky Mountain locust.

Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

Warmer temperatures across the region from climate change are making insect pests hungrier. That’s according to a new study published in the journal Science.

Chelsea Biondolillo

Chelsea Biondolillo is a prose writer living in Wyoming. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Shenandoah, River Teeth, Passages North, Hayden’s Ferry Review and others. She has a master’s degree from the University of Wyoming in creative writing and environmental studies, and is currently working on a book about vultures.

These essays were originally published in The Fiddleback.