Hill bill

The Wyoming House Education Committee has voted down a proposed Constitutional Amendment that could have led to an appointed State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The 7-2 vote to kill the bill likely ends a two year effort to remove the Superintendent as an elected state official.

Noting heavy public opposition to the bill, Encampment Republican Jerry Paxton said it’s time to stop the discussion.

Wyoming LSO

The Legislature's Joint Education Committee is moving forward with an effort to study alternative ways to manage the Wyoming Department of Education and will seek input from education stakeholders and the public in that process.

A Wyoming legislative committee will decide if it wants to reconsider the powers and duties of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction this Friday. 

State Superintendent Cindy Hill returned to lead the Department of Education this week, after the Wyoming Supreme Court ruled that a law stripping her ability to oversee the department was unconstitutional. 

Governor Matt Mead says he doesn’t know what the legislative committee will try to do.

Judge Delays Reinstating Superintendent Hill

Mar 18, 2014
Wyoming LSO

A District Court Judge has asked for more information before he issues an order allowing State Superintendent Cindy Hill to resume her duties as head of the Wyoming Department of Education. 

In January, the Wyoming Supreme Court ruled that a 2013 law that removed the elected superintendent as department head was unconstitutional.   Laramie County District Court  Judge Thomas Campbell ordered attorneys for the state and Hill to file written analyzes over the next three weeks on whether any parts of the law are constitutional.  Senator Hank Coe of Cody says that’s good news. 

The Wyoming legislature’s management council voted unanimously today/Tuesday to provide 100-thousand dollars to a special committee investigating State Superintendent Cindy Hill. 

Hill is accused of mismanaging federal funds, abusing state resources, and creating a hostile work environment.  Hill has denied the allegations. 

Speaker of the House Tom Lubnau says they need extra help to complete what he says is a complicated investigation.  Normally the Legislative Service Office helps lawmakers with this work, but he says the L-S-O is limited by law in what they can do.

The Wyoming Supreme Court has agreed to hear the lawsuit filed by state schools Superintendent Cindy Hill.
 
 Hill is suing the state and Gov. Matt Mead over a new law that took away many of her powers and duties.
 
Laramie County District Judge Thomas Campbell last month asked the Supreme Court to take up the lawsuit because it raises constitutional questions.
 

State Superintendent Cindy Hill will take her case to the Wyoming Supreme Court.

Wednesday District Court Judge Thomas Campbell refused to issue a preliminary injunction and restore her powers and duties immediately.  But he did send her case immediately to the Wyoming Supreme Court for further action.   

The Legislature and Gov. Matt Mead approved a law this winter taking away many of the superintendent's powers and duties. It included replacing the superintendent as administrative head of the state Education Department with a director appointed by the governor.

Senate File 104 – better known as the Hill Bill - passed in the legislative session that just ended. But it might be challenged in the next election if organizers of a new referendum can get enough signatures to put it on the ballot.

The bill removed some powers from  State Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill.  It also created a State Education Director that will be appointed by the governor.  The Director will oversee the State Department of Education.