gender

Safe Project

The Me Too movement is changing the conversation about sexual violence. For some women, it's been empowering but, also, a painful reminder of buried trauma. And for some men, it's been a realization that they want to do more to change the status quo. One victim advocacy group in Wyoming wants to help men make that change by giving them better tools.

Catherine Wheeler

Mikayla Patton had no intention of going into what she calls "dirty work" before starting school at Gillette College. She thought maybe she would try criminal justice. But then she got a phone call from her dad. He had worked on oil rigs and in coal mines.

Tennessee Watson / Wyoming Public Radio

High school girls in Wyoming have access to 10 sports, while boys have 11. That's why advocates are pushing for girls softball to be added to the list of sanctioned sports. The Wyoming High School Activities Association will add girls softball as long as eight high schools agree to create teams.

A new study out of our region shows that when more women are involved in group-decision making about natural resources, conservation gets a boost.

The Modern West 45: Winning Winter

Mar 26, 2019
Andrew Burr

Men and women skiers might race down the same mountain, but the prize money at the bottom isn’t necessarily the same. Plus, how ice climbing is warming to female climbers and a conversation with the women who made dog sled racing history.

Flickr Creative Commons/Joseph B

In the early days of psychology, therapists thought mental health disorders were mostly experienced by one gender or the other: for instance, anorexia by women, or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) by men. But in the last couple decades, the thinking has swung hard the other way with attempts to ignore the role of gender in mental health studies.

Two Mountain West states are part of a dozen across the country that allow people to select non-binary gender on legal documents.

Colorado residents, who do not identify as male or female, will be able to choose "X" as their gender on driver's licenses starting on Nov. 30.

"It's really important that Colorado is now allowing another opportunity for male, female and non-binary -- people who identify as neither male or female -- to also have an identity document who matches who they are," said Daniel Ramos, executive director of One Colorado, an LGBTQ advocacy organization.