diversity

Vanessa Chavarriaga


Vanessa Chavarriaga loves to be outside, whether it's floating down a river in the desert or ice skating on a frozen alpine lake. And when she posts photos of her adventures, she includes information about where exactly she was.


Wyoming is majority White, but the state is more diverse than people think. The Wyoming Community Foundation says that misconception allows for racism and racial disparities to go unchecked. It's a problem the foundation explored in a report titled: "Does Race Matter In Wyoming?"

Wyoming Public Radio's Tennessee Watson sat down with the foundation's chief operating officer Samin Dadelahi to learn more.

Naina Rao

For people of color and immigrants living in Wyoming, getting a haircut, shopping for groceries, or celebrating holidays can be difficult. Wyoming Public Radio's Naina Rao has been making trips between Laramie, Wyoming, and Denver, Colorado to get the basic cultural amenities she needs for her lifestyle. She takes us on her journey in this audio postcard.

University of Wyoming


Part of the University of Wyoming's mission is to value and nurture diversity. But that's hard to do when the university struggles to attract and retain faculty and administrators of color. To help, Dr. Emily Monago was hired as UW's chief diversity officer three years ago.

The inaugural #BlackBirdersWeek kicked off on Sunday. The virtual event came about in response to the racist incident in Central Park last week when a white woman called the police after a Black birder asked her to put her dog on a leash.

Catherine Wheeler

Destiny and Taylor are both 17 years old and from Rock Springs. In 2019 both attended a disciplinary school in Sheridan called the Wyoming Girls School. They say there are good parts of Wyoming, but difficult experiences are pushing them to leave. For our "Belonging" series, the two sat down to discuss how their experiences in and out of Rock Springs have shaped them and their ideas of community. Destiny starts the conversation off. 

Laramie County Library Source

The Wyoming State Museum's traveling exhibit on black homesteaders, "Empire: A Community of African-Americans on the Wyoming Plains" is on display now at the Laramie County Library in Cheyenne. Founded in 1908, Empire was a black community about ten miles northeast of Torrington, and about a mile past the Nebraskan border. 

Savannah Maher

Growing up on the Wind River Reservation, Gabby St. Clair and Angelo Sage say that their families, traditions, and languages gave them a sense of belonging. But they both attended high school in predominantly white Reservation border towns. For Wyoming Public Radio's "Belonging" series, they sat down to talk about how the love and support of their tribal communities - St. Clair is Eastern Shoshone and Sage is Northern Arapaho - helps them through life's challenges and pulls them to stay here in Wyoming.

Wyoming Community Foundation

 

 

Students of color are more likely to be suspended from Wyoming's public schools than their white counterparts. That's according to a report released by the Wyoming Community Foundation.

McCormick Junior High

In March, racist and homophobic flyers were passed out by students at McCormick Junior High School to members of the school's Gay Straight Alliance club. It was the latest, but far from the only instance of bullying to take place at the Cheyenne school. And it put the school under a spotlight.

Bishop Museum

Back in 1908, Hawaiian Cowboys competed in the Cheyenne Frontier Days. In the new book, Aloha Rodeo: The Three Cowboys, the World's Greatest Rodeo, and the Hidden History of the American West, co-author David Wolman explores how and why Hawaiian Cowboys came to compete in the rodeo. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska asked Wolman if the two cowboy cultures were different in any way.

"We Kind Of Live In The Middle"

Jul 19, 2019
Charles Fournier


Though they have felt like outsiders at times, Allen Pino and Catalina Pedroza—who are both pursuing careers as educators—feel a strong sense of loyalty to Wyoming. For WPR's "Belonging" series, they sat down to discuss racial identity and how Wyoming stereotypes can be at odds with a vision of a state full of potential.

Maggie Mullen

Wyoming is known as the Equality State. So it's fitting that earlier this year one of its Boy Scout Troops was amongst the first in the country to induct girls. The national organization changed its policy in February to be more inclusive. Since then, Troop 221 in Cheyenne has already seen its female scout number double.

University of Wyoming Senior Associate Athletics Director and Senior Woman administrator China Jude was recently named the President of the Minority Opportunities Athletics Association. The goal of the organization is to get more minorities into athletics administration. She tells Bob Beck about her goals during her two year term.

Charles Fournier

June is Pride Month. So this first installation of the "Belonging" series is a conversation between Connor Sears and Jesse Archambeau. They're both 2018 Cheyenne East High School grads who left for college in Peoria, Illinois where a more prominent LGBTQ community has helped them to foster their own identities. Now, they struggle with the reality that their absences perpetuate a trend that leaves Wyoming's queer youth without the mentorship they themselves yearned for.


Update posted June 26, 2019 at 5:48 p.m.: A spokesperson with Clayton Homes says the company has reopened conversations with the Black American West Museum & Heritage Center about the properties they own in Dearfield. "Our hope is to find a way to support their goals while moving ahead with plans to establish affordable housing in the area," said a statement.

http://www.uwyo.edu/diversity/today/

As a part of the University of Wyoming's strategic plan, students, staff and faculty are being asked to participate in a survey on diversity and campus climate. 

A film festival highlighting women athletes is showing in Laramie this week. The No Man's Land Film Festival started in Carbondale, Colorado and now travels around the world with the goal of making the adventure and sports film genre more diverse.

London Homer-Wambeam

At the University of Wyoming Student Union, a long line of students made their way down a row of tables, carefully examining artifacts, many of them taking photos with their phones. They are visiting the Black History 101 Mobile Museum

Award-winning author Nina McConigley reflects on her life growing up in Wyoming. McConigley discusses her life journey of being a girl, teenager, woman, and teacher - neither fully Indian, nor fully Anglo, but thoroughly American. thinkwy.org/podcast/

Maggie Mullen

The trucking industry is facing a record shortage of drivers. However, over the last couple of years, one demographic has been gravitating towards the industry by the thousands: Indian-American Sikhs.

Screen shot from http://www.uwyo.edu/aist/index.html

The University of Wyoming has released a draft strategic plan designed to better meet the needs of Native American students and their communities.

yr.media

An essay has drawn national attention to how University of Wyoming faculty address difficult topics like racism when they come up in the classroom. It was written by Taylar Stagner, a Native American graduate of the University of Wyoming, who is also a part-time reporter at Wyoming Public Radio.

Taylar Dawn Stagner


Across the country, Native American students are severely underrepresented in higher education . Only 16 percent of Native Americans have a bachelor's degree. That's compared to 42 percent of white students. But a collective effort — that spans from the Wind River Reservation to the University of Wyoming — is helping to close that achievement gap.

Screen shot from http://www.uwyo.edu/diversity/council-on-dei/committee-membership.html

The University of Wyoming is introducing new mandatory training for faculty and staff in an effort to foster a stronger culture of inclusivity. Increased programming on diversity and inclusion is part of the university's strategic plan.

Melodie Edwards

A Tour Of Rawlins

Longtime Rawlins city councilor and former mayor DeBari Martinez gives me a tour around town in his truck. He points out all the Latino-owned businesses we pass: a flower shop, a photographer's studio, a steakhouse.

The 2018 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report commissioned by American Express

Wyoming is ranked 42nd in the nation for growth of women-owned businesses since 2007, with a 22 percent increase in that time. That’s compared to a 58 percent increase of women-owned businesses nationwide. But Wyoming still ranks in the top ten for women’s businesses that employ large numbers of people.

Tennessee Watson / Wyoming Public Radio

The University of Wyoming (UW) officially launched its controversial new marketing plan with a presentation, Tuesday, to orient staff to the campaign's central slogan: “The world needs more cowboys.” But it’s raised the question: what about more cowgirls?

Caroline Ballard

Nearly a quarter of Wyoming’s population is Native American. But how they are portrayed—by Natives and by whites—is complicated.

University of Wyoming

Until recently, Wyoming was one of only two states without a chapter of the National Black Law Students Association. UW law student Debra Bullock started a chapter this winter, in part to be able to participate in the organization’s Nelson Mandela International Negotiations Competition. 

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