children

Wyoming Department of Health

The Wyoming Children's Health Insurance Program, also known as Kid Care CHIP, will transition from a private insurance company to the processes in place already for Wyoming Medicaid. 

This means it will be taken over by the Wyoming Department of Health. In the past, a private insurance company administered the program. 

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

As we focus on suffrage in Wyoming, we are taking this opportunity to preview a new podcast that Wyoming Public Media and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West are in the process of creating. The KidsAskWhy podcast amplifies the voices of kids who want to ask questions. And it turns out Wyoming kids want to know about women's suffrage as well. Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck spoke to producer Kamila Kudelska.

Bob Beck

One of the difficult things for children who are placed in group homes is how to manage when they leave that setting. It used to be that when those 18-year-olds left a group home, they would essentially have to fend for themselves. In Laramie, Cathedral Home for Children has the Extended Families Program that tries to help young people navigate the so-called real world.

Nationwide, more and more people are surviving childhood. But researchers found those improvements might not be as big in rural areas. 

A report last year found that child mortality rates had improved. In fact, nationally, it looked like the country had met its 2020 goals. But then researchers took a closer look.

A few months ago, Tricia Shields was having a regular day at work. 

“I think I was daydreaming at my desk,” says Shields, a resident of Parker, Colorado, who was at the time working at a kidney care center in Denver.

Pixabay

A report focusing on the overall health of children from newborn to age three says Wyoming has some room to improve.

https://pxhere.com

With busy schedules, extra visitors and new toys, the holidays can introduce new hazards into an environment. According to the Nebraska Regional Poison Center, accidental poisonings increase over the holidays. 

The number of uninsured children across the country has increased for the first time in more than a decade.


Wyomingites working to reduce violence gathered this week for the 3rd Annual Conference for Violence Prevention and Response. A major portion of the conference was devoted to spreading awareness about the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, or ACES for short.

yoming Public Radio's Tennessee Watson sat down with Jennifer Davis from the Wyoming Children's Trust Fund and Todd Garrison from the Montana-based not-for-profit ChildWise to understand why ACES could make a difference in Wyoming.

The country's first free-range parenting law goes into effect in Utah May 8. But people in other states are already warming to the idea.

childrensmuseumofcheyenne.org

The dream of an interactive children’s museum in Cheyenne is one step closer to reality. The Wyoming Humanities Council is investing $25,000 towards a stage and theatre in the new museum. The 300-400 seat venue will be a flexible space that can host events for all ages.

Museum President Amy Surdam says the idea for an interactive museum came from taking her own kids to a children’s museum in Bloomington, Indiana. The interactive exhibits sparked her children’s interest in learning and got Surdam wondering about a similar museum in Cheyenne.

Two Wyoming children are leading the charge against African elephant poaching. 

The Tooth Fairy Project is an elephant conservation event in Jackson on Saturday and Sunday. Two Jackson children, 11 year old Lily Marvin and 9 year old Alex French are headlining they event after they caught a filmmaker’s attention because of their passion for saving elephants.  The filmmaker is creating a documentary called Elephant Daze about elephant poaching and plans to incorporate the children into the documentary.

A few weeks ago, we reported that victims of domestic violence are staying in shelters longer than they used to, in part because it’s gotten harder for them to find jobs and affordable housing. We turn now to a different aspect of domestic violence: children. When a victim decides to leave an abuser, there are often battles over custody. Dona

Nationally and in Wyoming, more children are being cared for by Grandparents or other family members.

Children end up being cared for by relatives or close family friends because of military deployments, the death of a parent, substance abuse or mental illness, or child abuse and neglect.  The Annie E. Casey Foundation says some four thousand Wyoming children are being cared for by a family member.  Wyoming Kids Count Director Marc Homer says these can be excellent guardians for children, but he notes that state policies can be challenging for these caregivers.

A new report from the Wyoming Children’s Action Alliance says between 2005 and 2010, the number of children living in poverty jumped from 11 percent to 14 percent. Marc Homer is with the Children’s Action Alliance. He says the biggest spike came in 2009 and 10 when the nations recession began to catch up to the state, and childhood poverty jumped from 13 percent to 19 percent.

“Certainly I think it’s the recession that’s hit the United States and its impacted Wyoming,” says Homer. “So we’re seeing a slowing of the economy and this trickles down to families in our communities.”