Cheyenne Police Department

Tennessee Watson


Sixteen years ago, the Cheyenne Police Department received a report that a former Catholic Bishop had sexually abused a teenage boy in the 1970s. The lead detective told the prosecutor there was no evidence and the case was closed. Earlier this year that case was reopened and multiple victims have since come forward. This second chance at justice reflects how law enforcement attitudes toward sexual abuse are starting to change.

Cheyenne Police Department

The Cheyenne Police Department is seeking information from any victims or witnesses of sex abuse crimes related to any church official. 

Cheyenne Police Department

The Cheyenne Police Department would like to equip its officers with body cameras, and is asking the Cheyenne City Council to approve funds for 75 body cams, as well as 75 dashboard cams to replace the current ones.

Last year, the Wyoming Legislature passed a bill limiting the kind of footage from police body and dashboard cameras that can be requested and viewed by the public. The law limits that footage to incidents involving deadly force and complaints against law enforcement, or if the footage is in the interest of public safety.

An undercover operation that led to the arrests of 15 people during Cheyenne Frontier Days has put a spotlight on human trafficking in the state. The sting was a joint effort by the Cheyenne Police Department, the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation, and the FBI, and several individuals involved in the operation were members of the Attorney General’s Human Trafficking Task Force.

Cheyenne Police Department via Facebook

The Cheyenne Police Department claims racial bias is not an issue for its officers.

The Department released data this week showing how different racial groups in Cheyenne are represented in police citations—and incidents where police use force with a crime suspect.

"We don’t believe it’s a problem here, but with all this discussion nationwide, let’s actually go in—do the analysis so that we can confirm it’s not an issue in the community," says CPD public information officer Dan Long.

Miles Bryan

One of the most riveting images that has emerged out of the protests in Ferguson, Missouri is of civilian police officers using military vehicles for crowd control. For years, the Department of Defense has distributed equipment and vehicles to law enforcement offices all across the country, including some in Wyoming. I rode along with the Cheyenne SWAT team as they trained with their new military vehicle.

credit DJ Lein via Flickr

As military activity in Iraq and Afghanistan has wound down, military armored vehicles have been making their way back home.

Big Horn County and the cities of Cheyenne and Casper have all received heavily armored vehicles designed to protect soldiers from mines and rocket attacks in the Middle East.

“Our new [armored vehicle] can protect us against rifle rounds. Whereas our old [civilian armored vehicle] couldn’t,” says Cheyenne Police Department spokesperson Dan Long.

Irina Zhorov

A new program will allow Laramie and Cheyenne police officers to help one another during the Jubilee and Frontier Days weekends this month.

The arrangement allows an employee of one city to work in another city as needed. The police departments have decided to pilot the program with a focus on preventing drunk driving during the two popular festivals, beginning this weekend.

Commander Mitchell Cushman of the Laramie Police Department says that while the Cheyenne officers will be actively patrolling for impaired drivers, they will be able to enforce all Laramie laws. 

The Cheyenne Police Department has wrapped up a program that was intended to help the homeless get access to shelter and other services, and keep them out of jail.

The Homeless Empowerment Action Team, or HEAT, consisted of police officers and Robin Zimmer, the director of the COMEA homeless shelter. They went around town, informed homeless people of laws about loitering and panhandling, and told them about available social services.

But most individuals declined shelter or other help. Zimmer says that’s because many were alcoholics, and the only shelter in town is dry.

Last summer, the Cheyenne Police Department launched the Homeless Empowerment Action Team, or HEAT. Police officers and the director of Cheyenne’s homeless shelter, the COMEA House, went around town and talked with homeless people.

They made sure homeless individuals knew the rules regarding trespassing, panhandling, and public intoxication, and warned them of the penalties for breaking those laws. They also told homeless individuals about services available to them. The goal was to help the homeless get back on their feet, and make them law abiding citizens.