Art

Jason Hammock

A new virtual gallery has made it possible for those self-distancing to still enjoy the arts. It Takes A Village is the brainchild of Cheyenne-based artist Bria Hammock and is Wyoming's first quarantine-friendly art gallery. 

https://www.westernaf.net/

The coronavirus pandemic has put an indefinite hold on live events, and musicians are among those losing out. So performers are turning to the internet as a virtual concert venue.

Courtesy University of Wyoming Art Museum

Arts organizations throughout Wyoming are stepping up with creative online activities while the coronavirus epidemic keeps people home.

Jennifer Carrigan

The Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area announced its four artists in residence for the coming summer.

Bethann Garramon Merkle

Her Flag is a nationwide project celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gave some U.S. women the right to vote. Bethann Garramon Merkle is a research scientist at the University of Wyoming and one of the women chosen to participate in the Her Flag project.

Catherine Wheeler

The auditorium at the Sheridan VA Health Care System is a space for veterans to come, shoot pool, play board games, or just hang out.

But on Tuesday, March 3, it was serving as an art gallery. The VA is hosting its annual Creative Arts Festival that allows veterans from across the state to submit a wide range of artistic creations.

Cristy Anspach

A Pinedale artist has a new show on display that was inspired by…roadkill. Cristy Anspach has spent the last two and a half years making ceramic jars to honor each animal killed on her route between Boulder and Pinedale. Over the course of eight months she made 110 jars. The show, titled "Unintended Consequences" will be on display at the Mystery Print Gallery until March 1.

Anspach talked to Wyoming Public Radio's Megan Feighery about finding beauty in death and how every creature deserves respect.

Robert Martinez

Governor Mark Gordon honored five Wyoming artists with the 2019 Governor's Arts Award, including visual artist and graphic designer Robert Martinez. Martinez is Northern Arapaho and Chicano, and grew up in a family of talented painters and beadworkers on the Wind River Reservation. He draws and paints portraits using bright, contrasting tones in a style intended to challenge the viewer's assumptions of what Native people and Native art should look like.

"You see many depictions of Natives as black and white or sepia toned, and that connotes to a dead culture," Martinez said. "So, one of the things I was doing with this bright paint was I wanted to show that we're not dead, we're alive and strong."

Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher visited Martinez at his studio outside of Riverton and talked with him about his work and what it means to be one of only a few people of color ever awarded the state's top artistic honor.

Plains Indian Museum

The Plains Indian Museum doesn't only collect art from the past. Rebecca West, the curator of the museum, said their job is also to collect contemporary art like those of John Isaiah Pepion, of the Blackfeet nation in northern Montana.

Laramie County Library Source

The Wyoming State Museum's traveling exhibit on black homesteaders, "Empire: A Community of African-Americans on the Wyoming Plains" is on display now at the Laramie County Library in Cheyenne. Founded in 1908, Empire was a black community about ten miles northeast of Torrington, and about a mile past the Nebraskan border. 

Public Domain

The spring season of the Northwest Wyoming Film Series begins the week of January 27. The film series is entering its eighth season of showing signature films for people in the northwest region. Harriet Bloom-Wilson, a board member of the series, said it allows residents of the Bighorn Basin the opportunity to see more than just Hollywood films.

Catherine Wheeler / Wyoming Public Media

The Sheridan VA Health System is looking for veterans across the state to submit their art to its Creative Arts Festival for Veterans.

Melodie Edwards

It isn't easy keeping America's folk arts alive, but the Wyoming Arts Council has been doing their best to preserve Wyoming's. Each year, they give out grants to folk artists who pass on their knowledge to the next generation.

Jack Mease braids rawhide to create beautiful horse tack like reins and hackamores, and now has taught numerous students, including Soliana Abernathy. Mease and Abernathy were among last year's recipients of the Wyoming Arts Council's Folk and Traditional Art Mentoring grant. You can see Mease's work at the State Museum in Cheyenne.

Wyoming Public Radio's Melodie Edwards visited Mease's workshop in Lander.

Wyoming Humanities

Wyoming has been working towards economic diversification and one way to do that is to make Wyoming's culture, arts and humanities programs a bigger part of the effort. Recently the former CEO of the Wyoming Business Council, Shawn Reese, joined Wyoming Humanities to further this effort. The Director of Wyoming Humanities is Shannon Smith and she and Reese explain the idea to Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck.

Whitney Western Art Museum

The Charles Russell painting titled “When Law Dulls The Edge of Chance” depicts two North-West Mounted Police or Monty's disarming two horse thieves. Karen McWhorter, the curator of the Whitney Western Art Museum, said the painting has had many different names and one of those included the phrase “horse thieves”

Plains Indian Museum

Beads were one of the main products traded between Native Americans and Europeans. For museum curators and historians, the presence of beads on objects helps place an approximate time frame of when it was created.

Savannah Maher

The library at Wyoming Indian Middle School in Ethete is hands-down the coziest place in the building. When I walk in after driving through a snow storm, the lights are dim and there's some kind of woodsy incense burning. But a few weeks ago, librarian Jenn Runs Close to Lodge said the atmosphere was a bit more chaotic.


Ucross Foundation

For the first time in 41 years, an Indigenous person will sit on the Ucross Foundation's Board of Directors. The foundation announced the appointment of Scott Manning Stevens, a citizen of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation, On Thursday, November 21. 

Cooper McKim

Your phone, your house, your car. It all originally comes from the earth. Artist Nina Elder is fascinated by the complexity of land being at once something beautiful, sometimes sacred, and often extremely valuable - providing resources that the modern world depends on. Through long journeys to mining-based communities, Elder collects found materials and creates intricate drawings that help tell the multilayered stories that lands have to tell.

She's been supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation, Rauschenberg Foundation, and the Pollock Krausner Foundation. Elder has been features in VICE Magazine, PBS and Art In America. She's also held positions as an Art + Environment Research Fellow at the Nevada Museum of Art and Polar Lab Research Fellow. Wyoming Public Radio's Cooper McKim speaks with Elder about her latest exhibit now at the University of Wyoming's Visual Arts Building called Nina Elder: Accumulations.

Ryan Shippy / Sheridan College

Native Americans are considered to serve in the military at a higher rate than any other demographic, and a new exhibit coming to Sheridan College highlights that service.

Savannah Maher

Jackson's Snow King Sports Center usually hosts skating lessons and peewee hockey games. But for one weekend in mid-September, it was filled with about $50 million worth of art.

The space had been taken over by the brand new Jackson Hole Fine Arts Fair. Visitors were greeted at the door by a giant inflatable goldfish — the work of Jackson artist Bland Hoke — before visiting booths from more than 50 galleries based all over the country.


Lander Arts Center

The Lander Art Center is highlighting artists from the Wind River Reservation with an exhibit called "Art of Home." The show features beadwork, paintings, photography, sewing and sculpture from more than a dozen Native artists.

When a visitor enters the Whitney Western Art Museum one sculpture might confuse the visitor. Choosing of the Arrow by Henry Kirke Brown might remind people not of the West, but of a classic European sculpture. But Karen McWhorter, the curator of the museum, said it’s actually the first bronze case made in America in 1849. 

Adam Sings In The Timber

Crow Fair is unlike any other Powwow in the world. For one, horses and their riders have the right of way on roads throughout the Powwow grounds. It also begins every morning with a parade. 


Courtesy of the Tony Foster Foundation

The Whitney Western Art Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West hosted explorer artist Tony Foster for a week. For the past 35 years, Foster takes journeys to paint wild areas…many of them in the American West. Before his residency at the Buffalo Bill Center, he went on a rafting journey on the Green River. Wyoming Public Radio's Kamila Kudelska spoke with Foster to get a better understanding of what it means to be an explorer artist today.

Catherine Wheeler

The Ucross Foundation's ranch is usually very quiet and serene, but tonight, the art gallery that sits on the grounds is filled with the sounds of people and the art itself.

Catherine Wheeler

A Wyoming artist, James Jackson has received a National Heritage Fellowship. It's the nation's highest honor that celebrates traditional and folk art. Jackson is most well-known for his intricate leather carving and spent most of his career at King's Saddlery in Sheridan. Wyoming Public Radio's Catherine Wheeler sat down with Jackson in his leather shop at the Brinton Museum to talk about how his career has been infused with Wyoming's culture.

Luzene Hill

The Ucross Foundation has announced the newest recipient of its fellowship for Native American Visual Artists.

Yellowstone National Park

The first tribal marketplace and fashion show in Yellowstone National Park starts Tuesday, June 11. Northern Plains artists will display and engage with park visitors through discussions and demonstrations.

Catherine Wheeler

About 30 miles southeast of Sheridan, the Ucross Foundation sits on a 20,000-acre working cattle ranch. But that's not what it's known for.

The ranch is home to the Ucross Foundation Residency Program. Foundation president and executive director Sharon Dynak said it's a place for writers and artists to focus on their work. 

Pages