affordable housing

CJ Oliver/Flickr Creative Commons

Housing in tribal communities across the country has led to numerous social problems, including those in Wyoming. On the Wind River Reservation, it has led to a severe housing shortage with overcrowding in the homes that are available and to homelessness in the community. Housing stock has grown old and is falling into disrepair and about 600 new housing units are needed to fill the need.

Sheridan County

Sheridan County Commissioners are hosting a public meeting aimed at developing more affordable housing in the county on February 5.

Northern Arapaho Tribal Housing

The Northern Arapaho Tribe has been awarded a nearly $5 million federal grant to develop affordable housing on the Wind River Reservation.

Wikimedia Commons

The city of Lander's Zoning and Planning Board has launched a study aimed at identifying barriers to affordable housing development. At a pair of community forums on Tuesday, residents were given the opportunity to weigh in.

The United States added more than 200,000 jobs last month, according to the latest report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While wages and jobs are growing in the Mountain West, they aren’t outpacing the skyrocketing cost of housing. 

Courtesy Jackson Hole Community Housing Trust

The lack of affordable housing in Teton County is affecting state agencies like the Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

Public Domain

Jackson State Representative Mike Yin is proposing a bill that could help address the affordable housing shortage in his district. It would allow counties to charge a fee for homes left empty more than six months out of the year.

JACKSON, Wyo. — In this corner of the Cowboy State, where homes start at $1 million, it may appear Teton County Sheriff Matt Carr made out like a bandit.

MOAB — After a recent 12-hour nursing shift at the local hospital, Ryan Huels took stock of his tidy home just south of this high desert town.

Housing prices are still on the rise in the Mountain West, and so is the cost renting. That's according to the latest housing report from Zillow.


Courtesy Jackson Hole Community Housing Trust

Teton County has long been the wealthiest area of Wyoming, but the median household income for a family of four just cracked $100,000 for the first time in 2018, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Flickr Creative Commons/Lynette

A program that helps victims of domestic violence is increasingly having trouble finding safe places for people to stay because of an energy boom that has filled all the housing options in the area. Converse Hope Center Director Lisa Thalken said recently, when a woman sought their help, they couldn't find anywhere to put her.

StoryCorps

As a chef for a Jackson Hole outfitter, Christine Semrow struggled to find an affordable place to live in Jackson.

When StoryCorps came to Jackson in 2018, Semrow sat down with StoryCorps facilitator Madison Mullen to talk about what it’s like to be part of the 99-percent in Jackson.

StoryCorps

When StoryCorps came to Jackson last summer, friends Stephanie Thomas and Carrie Krose sat down to discuss how the affordable housing shortage in Jackson is affecting children. 

StoryCorps

When StoryCorps came to Jackson last summer, friends Arne Jorgensen and Anne Cresswell discussed the lack of concern for affordable housing in their community.

Melodie Edwards

It's freezing outside as Terry Short smokes a cigarette under a hotel's awning near downtown Douglas. He's wearing a Dallas Cowboys sweatshirt, his hometown team.

"For the most part it's as nice little sleepy town that you know generally doesn't have a whole lot of chaos," Short said.

Short is an oil field worker for a company called Gunslinger. Today is his day off, but normally he would be out in the field doing inspections or survey work. Short is far from the only worker of his kind in the area. He said folks get a daily per diem from companies to live on. The housing strategies are diverse and often focused on saving. 

Melodie Edwards

This story is part of a two-part series on the effects of the Converse County energy boom on housing in Douglas. 

I knock on the door of an apartment in the one and only income-restricted apartment complex in Douglas. 29-year-old Elise shows me in. Petite with long dark hair and a friendly smile, she gives me a tour of the small apartment she shares with her two children. We're not using her last name to protect her from retaliation. I notice a sign on the living room wall that says, "Home Sweet Home," and for Elise, a home has never been so sweet as this one. About eighteen months ago, Elise left an abusive relationship with her children's father.

National Park Service

Yellowstone National Park may add more seasonal housing for their employees and is seeking public comment on a proposal. This comes after Yellowstone Lodges built five new lodging facilities in Canyon Village, which increased the guest capacity to about 2,200 people per night.

StoryCorps

Jackson is the most economically unequal city in the U.S. That's according to the Economic Policy Institute, a non-partisan think tank. A study found in 2016 that the income gap between the bottom 99 percent and the top one percent is widest in Jackson.

That makes affordable housing challenging. When StoryCorps came to Jackson in June, friends Marcela Badillo and Cristina Briones sat down to talk about what that means for immigrant families. 

The Modern West 40: More People, Less Affordable Housing

Nov 20, 2018
Bob Beck

The Mountain West's population boom is putting a squeeze on affordable housing. What's being done address the issue?

Our region is home to some of the hottest housing markets in the country but that trend may slowing down. 

Darrah Perez

Nationally, there’s a shortage of about 68,000 homes on tribal reservations, and on the Wind River Reservation, both the Northern Arapaho and the Eastern Shoshone tribes are hundreds of homes short. That’s led to severe overcrowding and homelessness there.

Caroline Ballard

Walk around Jackson this summer, and you can expect to see a few things: lots of people, lots of traffic, and lots of help wanted signs.

StoryCorps: Rory And Primm Loudenslager

Jun 27, 2018
StoryCorps

Lorelei "Rory" Loudenslager (7) talks to her mom Primm Loudenslager (32) about their old apartment, their new Habitat for Humanity House, the building process, and favorite things she likes to do, play, and learn. 

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson's recent proposal to triple rent for the lowest income households is part of what’s being called "Welfare Reform 2.0." This change to federal assistance could have a big impact on our growing region.

mobile homes in Cheyenne, Wyoming
Bob Beck

Cheyenne’s local government has been putting a lot of work behind its Fight the Blight campaign to address a number of abandoned houses and run-down buildings. But efforts to clean those places up have indicated another problem—a lack of affordable housing. 

 

Soon after Cheyenne Mayor Marian Orr took office in 2017, she formed the Fight the Blight committee. 

 

Sign for Guernsey, Wyoming
Maggie Mullen


What do you get when three ranchers, a school teacher, a real estate agent, and one community development coordinator walk into a bank? In Guernsey, Wyoming—a possible solution to the affordable housing problem that’s plaguing many parts of the nation, including the Mountain West.

Laramie County Community Partnership

Next fall, the Strong Families Action Team in Laramie County is hoping to open a new homeless shelter for young people. Action Team Co-Chairman Terry Williams said the goal is to provide shelter for K-12 students who either have nowhere to live or have an unsafe home life.

During a recent homeless count in Cheyenne, 39 unaccompanied K-12 students were identified. When surveyed, Williams said they wanted somewhere to live, so that they can complete their education.

Wyoming's outdated housing stock needs replacing, but resources to make that happen are limited. That's left most counties in the state in need of more low-income housing, according to a new Wyoming Business Council report

Jordan Cooper via Flickr

Teton County residents will vote in May whether to approve $70 million in revenue collected from a Special Purpose Excise Tax, or SPET. The tax would fund local infrastructure projects, including three housing developments meant to accommodate Jackson’s far-flung workforce. Two of the projects would provide housing for seasonal town and county employees.

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