Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program

ASUW

The University of Wyoming student government has helped set up an emergency fund for DACA students.

 

After Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program would be rescinded, the Department of Homeland Security stopped accepting new applications. But those who already have DACA status still have an opportunity to re-apply, and the application has a fee.

 

Maggie Mullen

Following Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ announcement that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA would be phased out, colleges and universities are trying to reassure impacted students, including those in Wyoming. But there are a few complications. For one, it’s unknown how many students are protected under the program.

Old Main by thecoldmidwest is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The University of Wyoming is closely monitoring federal decisions that could affect its immigrant students.

After Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced this week that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, would be phased out, University President Laurie Nichols said in a statement the school is keeping a close eye on the situation.

Nichols also said the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA, will remain in place at the University of Wyoming.

By DHS (http://www.uscg.mil/) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

What are your thoughts on the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA?

For more information, visit the US Citizenship & Immigration Services site.

By contributing your comment, you consent to the possibility of having it read on the air. 

WPM/NPR Community Discussion Rules