Wyoming Community Foundation

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Eight thousand children in Wyoming have young parents ages 18 to 24. Close to 60 percent of those families are low income, according to the Opening Doors for Young Parents report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Graphics courtesy of the Wyoming Community Foundation

Why do more moms have access to prenatal care in Johnson County than other parts of Wyoming? Why does Crook County have the highest on-time high school graduation rates?  

Annie E. Casey Foundation

A new study by the Annie E. Casey Foundation finds kids from immigrant families, as well as children of color, face persistent challenges that hinder their economic future.  

Courtesy Annie E. Casey Foundation

Wyoming has improved in national child well-being rankings over the past year, but still ranks very low when it comes to child health. That’s according the Kids Count Data Book released Tuesday by the Annie. E Casey Foundation.

Wyoming saw improvements in economic well-being, education and family & community concerns—and rose from 19th to 16th place overall in the annual rankings. But the Cowboy State still ranks 45th in the nation for child health.

The official child poverty rate in Wyoming—and around the country—may be too high. That’s according to a report released Wednesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The report says the measure created 50 years ago fails to account for the impacts of social programs and tax policy on poverty. It says a newer index—the Supplemental Poverty Measure—better measures the success of anti-poverty programs.