Annie E. Casey Foundation

2018 Kids Count Data Book

A large part of our region isn't doing very well when it comes to child health. That's according to the 2018 Kids Count Data Book out today.

Annie E. Casey Foundation

A new study by the Annie E. Casey Foundation finds kids from immigrant families, as well as children of color, face persistent challenges that hinder their economic future.  

The Annie E. Casey Foundation

Wyoming’s child well-being rank dropped from 12th to 27th nationally according to this year’s Kids Count Data Book put out by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Samin Dadelahi is the Chief Operating Officer for the Wyoming Community Foundation, which provided some of the data. She said since the newest report uses data from 2015, what the lower ranking reflects is the impact of Wyoming’s economic downturn on kids.

Eric Lewis via Flickr Creative Commons

Wyoming ranks 12th in the nation in child well-being, according to data released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Wyoming rose four places from last year’s report—one of the biggest improvements in the nation.

But while Wyoming ranked first for economic well-being, it came in 48th place in health in this year’s Kids Count profile, which is based on 2014 data.

A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation says that nearly one in ten Wyoming children has a parent or guardian who has spent time in prison or jail.  

The report says incarceration can have a negative impact on families and kids. The Wyoming Community Foundation’s Micah Richardson said Wyoming is above the national average when it comes to having a parent in prison.  One reason may be the state’s efforts to be tough on crime. 

Courtesy Annie E. Casey Foundation

Wyoming has improved in national child well-being rankings over the past year, but still ranks very low when it comes to child health. That’s according the Kids Count Data Book released Tuesday by the Annie. E Casey Foundation.

Wyoming saw improvements in economic well-being, education and family & community concerns—and rose from 19th to 16th place overall in the annual rankings. But the Cowboy State still ranks 45th in the nation for child health.

The official child poverty rate in Wyoming—and around the country—may be too high. That’s according to a report released Wednesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The report says the measure created 50 years ago fails to account for the impacts of social programs and tax policy on poverty. It says a newer index—the Supplemental Poverty Measure—better measures the success of anti-poverty programs.

Elizabeth Albert via Flickr Creative Commons

Wyoming has dropped several spots in its ranking in a national report on children’s well-being.

The 2014 Kids Count Index ranked Wyoming 19th in the country, down from 15th last year. The report weighs several factors. Wyoming earned a sixth place ranking for children’s economic well-being, but ranked 45th in health.

Some of the factors contributing to that low ranking include rates of teen alcohol abuse, the number of children without health insurance, and the number of babies born underweight.