Features

Laramie County Library Source

The Wyoming State Museum's traveling exhibit on black homesteaders, "Empire: A Community of African-Americans on the Wyoming Plains" is on display now at the Laramie County Library in Cheyenne. Founded in 1908, Empire was a black community about ten miles northeast of Torrington, and about a mile past the Nebraskan border. 

Public Domain

The spring season of the Northwest Wyoming Film Series begins the week of January 27. The film series is entering its eighth season of showing signature films for people in the northwest region. Harriet Bloom-Wilson, a board member of the series, said it allows residents of the Bighorn Basin the opportunity to see more than just Hollywood films.

Catherine Wheeler / Wyoming Public Media

The Sheridan VA Health System is looking for veterans across the state to submit their art to its Creative Arts Festival for Veterans.

Catherine Wheeler

The Ucross Artist Residency is receiving a $30,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in support of its Native American artist fellowship program.

Melodie Edwards

It isn't easy keeping America's folk arts alive, but the Wyoming Arts Council has been doing their best to preserve Wyoming's. Each year, they give out grants to folk artists who pass on their knowledge to the next generation.

Jack Mease braids rawhide to create beautiful horse tack like reins and hackamores, and now has taught numerous students, including Soliana Abernathy. Mease and Abernathy were among last year's recipients of the Wyoming Arts Council's Folk and Traditional Art Mentoring grant. You can see Mease's work at the State Museum in Cheyenne.

Wyoming Public Radio's Melodie Edwards visited Mease's workshop in Lander.

Wyoming Humanities

Wyoming has been working towards economic diversification and one way to do that is to make Wyoming's culture, arts and humanities programs a bigger part of the effort. Recently the former CEO of the Wyoming Business Council, Shawn Reese, joined Wyoming Humanities to further this effort. The Director of Wyoming Humanities is Shannon Smith and she and Reese explain the idea to Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck.

Jeff Victor

Wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone 25 years ago, after intense debate and under serious scrutiny. Park rangers exterminated the last wolves in Yellowstone nearly a century ago, and their return has restored the park's ecosystem to a state not seen in a long time.

Ian Murphy

Writer Alexandra Fuller has penned numerous memoirs about her childhood growing up in war-torn Africa in a family constantly scrambling to find stability, and now Fuller has released a new book called Travel Light, Move Fast. It chronicles both her father's death in a Budapest hospital and the horror of her son's death soon after.

Wyoming Public Radio's Melodie Edwards sat down with Fuller at her home in Jackson to talk about how, as she gets older, it's even more necessary to process such trauma by writing about it.

Alex Myers

A new novel tells the story of a newly-out transgender Harvard student who has to give everything up when his family and girlfriend reject him. He's broke and looking for a new start—so he heads to Wyoming. Continental Divide is partly based on the real-life experiences of author Alex Myers, who was the first openly transgender student at Harvard. He talked with Wyoming Public Radio's Erin Jones about Wyoming, masculinity, and writing a new kind of fiction.

Poll Results: Listeners Pick The Best Music Of 2019

Dec 31, 2019

The Best Music Of 2019

We asked listeners to vote from two lists, the top albums of 2019 and the top Wyoming albums of 2019, and we received an abundance of votes! Thanks to everyone who voted and thank you for listening to Wyoming Sounds. 

Go. See. Do.

Jackson-based writer Alexandra Fuller has released a new memoir that strives to reckon with her grief at the deaths of both her father and her son in close succession. 

Around this time of year, it’s not too hard to find a holiday train ride in the Mountain West, from the North Pole Express in Heber City, Utah to the Santa Express in Horseshoe Bend, Idaho.

To get a sense of how it all works, I visit Carson City, Nev. to take a look at the different options.

Pixabay / jackmac34

Winters in Norway usually last from October to late May—sound familiar? Norway also has something called the polar night. For about two months, the sun never rises above the horizon, giving way to some of the longest, darkest winters on earth. But to psychologists surprise, rates of seasonal depression there are extremely low for what one would expect. That's why Stanford Doctoral Student Kari Leibowitz went there to learn more. She told Wyoming Public Radio's Maggie Mullen about what she found in a town called Tromsø.

Walter Clapp

This is the 22nd year that the Rocky Mountain Dance Theatre in Cody hosted its annual Nutcracker performance. Cody's Nutcracker is all about inclusion and support from the community.

You have to be looking for Juan Pablo Mijares’s violin shop to find it. The storefront is tucked deep behind an alleyway in downtown Colorado Springs. Small details make the place feel decidedly old world, from the carved wooden sign above the entrance to the plink of violin strings that serve as door chimes. On a recent visit to Mijares’s shop, he says some of his customers declare the place is even otherworldly.

Taylar Stagner

Taylar Stagner spoke with Tiffany Midge a Lakota author about her career as a poet, author, and a columnist for Indian Country Today. Many of her humorist essays have been compiled in her new book Bury My Heart At Chuck E. Cheese. In this new book, she talks about Native representation in movies, pussy hats, and why humor is important in Indian Country.

In her new book Bury My Heart At Chuck E. Cheese, Tiffany Midge combines popular culture with Indigenous humor. Her collection of essays repackages many stories like Fifty Shades of Grey, The King and I, and Attack of the 50-Foot Woman. I asked the Standing Rock Lakota author why it's important to indigenize popular culture.

Ben Winship

Grady Kirkpatrick spoke with Teton Valley producer and musician, Ben Winship, about his 2019 albums Acorns and Toolshed.

On a recent walk along a trail north of Boise, Idaho near dusk, photographer Glenn Oakley stopped and pointed.

“Oh, over there. See that owl?”

A great horned owl was flying out over one of the hills.


Vote For The Best Music Of 2019

Dec 9, 2019

Do you have favorite albums from this year? Now's your chance to tell us! One vote per person please and the deadline is midnight on December 28. We'll play back all your favorites on Wyoming Sounds, Tuesday, December 31 and Wednesday, January 1 from 9 a.m. to noon.

Laramie-Based Western Americana Band Pluck! On Wyoming Sounds

Dec 6, 2019
Anna Rader

Pluck! live on Wyoming Sounds recorded 12/06/19.

Courtesy of Irish Dance Theatre

The Colorado nonprofit Irish Dance Theatre is hoping to introduce Wyoming audiences to a new kind of Irish Dance. The Celtic Gift is a family-friendly musical dance show that brings to life a holiday fairytale.

Ucross Foundation

For the first time in 41 years, an Indigenous person will sit on the Ucross Foundation's Board of Directors. The foundation announced the appointment of Scott Manning Stevens, a citizen of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation, On Thursday, November 21. 

Lucia R.M. Martino, Smithsonian

The Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. is featuring a portrait exhibition that was created by a University of Wyoming (UW) professor.

Terese Mailhot

After checking herself in to a psychiatric hospital in 2013, writer Terese Mailhot was given a notebook. The result is her award-winning debut memoir Heartberries, which tells the story of her coming-of-age on the Seabird Island First Nation in British Columbia, sometimes-tumultuous family relationships, and adult struggles with mental illness.

"My book is essentially about how to love when you come from a dysfunctional home and you have these long shadows of shame kind of following you everywhere you go," said Mailhot, now a New York Times Bestselling author, in an interview with Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher. During a recent visit to the University of Wyoming, Mailhot talked about the book's success and what Native writers risk and gain when they choose to put their stories out into the word.

Cooper McKim

Your phone, your house, your car. It all originally comes from the earth. Artist Nina Elder is fascinated by the complexity of land being at once something beautiful, sometimes sacred, and often extremely valuable - providing resources that the modern world depends on. Through long journeys to mining-based communities, Elder collects found materials and creates intricate drawings that help tell the multilayered stories that lands have to tell.

She's been supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation, Rauschenberg Foundation, and the Pollock Krausner Foundation. Elder has been features in VICE Magazine, PBS and Art In America. She's also held positions as an Art + Environment Research Fellow at the Nevada Museum of Art and Polar Lab Research Fellow. Wyoming Public Radio's Cooper McKim speaks with Elder about her latest exhibit now at the University of Wyoming's Visual Arts Building called Nina Elder: Accumulations.

Women's Suffrage Limerick Contest Winners

Nov 22, 2019
Wyoming House for Historic Women

In celebration of 150 years of women's suffrage in Wyoming, the University of Wyoming Department of History presented a limerick contest. Here are the winning entries.

Anna Rader

Rob Weimann live on Wyoming Sounds recorded 11/15/19.

Warner Brothers

Changes are coming to Buffalo's annual Longmire Days festival.

The four-day event celebrates the fictional sheriff Walt Longmire, the central character in a series of books by author Craig Johnson. In 2012, the mystery series was adapted into a popular television show.

Alpheus Media

 

A documentary film produced on the Wind River Reservation will air on PBS stations around the country on Monday, November 11.

Kim Nielsen

The author of a book called A Disability History of the United States is visiting the University of Wyoming this week as part of a celebration of the Wyoming Institute for Disabilities. Kim Nielsen is a professor of Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. She tells Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck that her book was not planned.

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