Celebrating Wyoming Suffrage And Beyond

Wyoming Public Media honors the 150th anniversary women's right to vote. In 1869, legislation granting women the right to vote and hold office was passed. In 2020, we commemorate the first vote cast by a Wyoming woman. She cast her vote in the small town of Laramie, 50 years before women could vote in the rest of the nation. Women shaped the West in the days of the great westward migrations. In Wyoming they broke the glass ceiling and established parity in our nation's voting laws. Since then, Wyoming's women have continued to blaze the way. This page captures some of their achievements.

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The Wyoming League of Women Voters is now providing survey results that will help voters decide about whether to retain judges when they go to the polls next Tuesday.

The problem in the past has been that judges who are up for retention aren’t allowed to campaign like other elected officials.

The primary elections are Tuesday, and 128 women are on the ballot as candidates for state and local offices. Richelle Keinath of the Wyoming Women’s Foundation says that may sound like a lot, but there are nearly three times as many men. “I think we still have a ways to go in terms of what is actually equal,” Keinath said. The gender gap is even more pronounced when it comes to the state legislature. Eighty men are running, compared to 28 women.

Wyoming’s primary elections are Tuesday, and there are more than three times as many male candidates on the ballot for the state legislature as females. That’s because many women find that serving in office, while also holding down a job and raising a family, is just too difficult. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.

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