All Things Considered

Monday - Friday 4:00PM-7:00PM and Saturday - Sunday 5:00PM-6:00PM

All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari ShapiroATC offers a potent mix of national and international news with regular state news updates and feature reports from the Wyoming Public Radio newsroom. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted today by Michel Martin.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

A case in a Florida court could fundamentally change the way Sea World and other marine parks operate. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, cited Sea World last year for safety violations after a trainer was drowned by one of the killer whales.

Letters: A Thanksgiving Tale

Nov 25, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

We turn now to our weekly political observers, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and the Brookings Institution here with me in Washington. E.J., welcome.

E.J. DIONNE: Thank you. Happy Thanksgiving.

It's been an All Things Considered Thanksgiving tradition since 1991— a Bailey White original short story. Over the years, White's stories have included tales about a rose queen, a telephone man, an ostrich farmer and a wife exacting revenge. This year, White presents "Call It Even." It's about a shy painter who moves from Florida to Vermont and wants to feel like he fits in — so he raises a dozen turkeys.

Ingrid Gerdes: A Tomboy With Soul

Nov 24, 2011

Originally from Springfield, Mo., "the Ozarks area of Missouri," Ingrid Gerdes is a neo-soul performer out of Boston, but she considers herself a Southern singer. Her latest album is titled Shed.

Boom Town, U.S.A.

Nov 23, 2011

In the small-town of Elko, ambition looks like high-heel suede booties on the floor of the auto shop at the local high school.

Brandi and Kaylee look like the Olsen twins. And they're the best auto-shop students at Elko High. The girls have a plan. Everyday out the school window, they see trucks heading up to the gold mines. Day and night. So, the girls figure, why not open a truck repair shop after they graduate?

"In Elko we've been really blessed and really lucky to actually have a good economy," Kaylee says. "We can actually have our hopes and dreams."

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

Seventy-five years ago Wednesday, two men, an ocean apart, stepped up to microphones. One man was a cello prodigy who had played for the queen of Spain. The other was the son of black sharecroppers, a regular in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on Nov. 23, 1936, Robert Johnson and Pablo Casals each walked into a room alone with their instruments. And on that day, each made recordings that would change music history.

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

Nov 21, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

With Thanksgiving hard upon us, now is a good time to think about our past. History writers can tell the best stories from centuries of human achievement and folly, yet too often they produce recitations of one damned thing after another. A few, though, combine a respect for accuracy with a deep understanding of the longings, fears and triumphs of the people of our past. Such books make magic.

Yo-Yo Ma's Bluegrass-Inspired 'Goat Rodeo'

Nov 21, 2011

A sense of humor comes through The Goat Rodeo Sessions, the latest Americana exploration for the world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma.

One night last September, Roger Craig, a computer scientist from Newark, Del., was about to make history.

In his second appearance on Jeopardy!, he'd given one of the most dominant performances ever seen on the show.

"The whole game was sort of like a flow type of experience," Craig tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan. "I was in the zone."

When it was time for "Final Jeopardy" — the last and most important wager of the game — Craig's competitor Tony Fan turned to him.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (Foreign language spoken)

Libya Weighs Life After Gadhafi

Nov 20, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Libya's interim government says Moammar Gadhafi's son Saif al-Islam will be tried at home. Saif was the last wanted member of the ruling family when he was captured this weekend, one month after Gadhafi's death.

Bill Maher Lays Down The (Mostly Silly) Law

Nov 20, 2011

Comedian Bill Maher wraps up every installment of his TV show, Real Time, with a segment called "New Rules." That's where he takes potshots at whatever's bothering him — from wrappers on ice cream cones, to red light cameras, to more serious subjects like war and economic ruin.

His new book, The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass, sports a title we can't say on the radio and a mix of rules both lighthearted and serious, some of which never appeared on television.

HBO's How to Make It in America airs its season finale Sunday, and if you listen close, you'll see what sets music supervisor Scott Vener apart.

Week In News: Obama Wraps Up Asia Tour

Nov 19, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

MAHMOUD SHAMMAM: What we can confirm now that Saif al-Gadhafi has been arrested and he should be tried in front of the Libyan court, by Libyan people and by Libyan justice.

Perhaps Scientists Like Lab Mice TOO Much

Nov 19, 2011

The lab mouse is the most ubiquitous animal in biomedical research, but that doesn't mean it's always the best subject for researching disease.

In a series of articles for Slate magazine, Daniel Engber looked into why the mouse is such a mainstay of science — and whether that's a good thing.

Billy McCarthy lost his mother to suicide when he was a teenager. He cared for his schizophrenic brother as best he could after that, but his brother landed in solitary confinement in prison, where he eventually took his own life, too. Somehow, McCarthy found a way to rise above his anguish — as a songwriter. He began playing music while living in foster care in California.

Kurt Vonnegut was a counterculture hero, a modern Mark Twain, an avuncular, jocular friend to the youth — until you got to know him.

"Kurt was actually rather flinty, rather irascible. He had something of a temper," author Charles Shields tells weekends on All Things Considered host Laura Sullivan. Shields is the author of a new biography of Vonnegut, called And So It Goes: Kurt Vonnegut: A Life.

"But as I also point out in the book," Shields adds, "he was a damaged person."

A.A. Bondy: Making His Own World

Nov 18, 2011

One Friday night at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb., more than 150 people are milling around waiting for A.A. Bondy to take the stage. His new album, Believers, came out two months ago and caught fans like Andre Steinbergs by surprise.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Albert Einstein better be watching his back. Physicists have added fuel to a fire that could destroy one of Einstein's fundamental notions: Nothing travels faster than the speed of light.

Week In Politics: Gingrich, Debt Panel

Nov 18, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now to our regular Friday political commentators, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times. Hello, both.

DAVID BROOKS: Hello.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

'Managed' Apple Creates A Buzz

Nov 18, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now, something completely unfair, something sure to make your mouth water. Listen to this description of a rising star in the apple world, an apple called SweeTango.

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

Pages