All Things Considered

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All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari ShapiroATC offers a potent mix of national and international news with regular state news updates and feature reports from the Wyoming Public Radio newsroom. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted today by Michel Martin.

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Author Judith Krantz pioneered what you could call the sex and shopping novel. Her stories featured heroines with big hair and bigger wardrobes. They pursued power, pleasure and fabulous clothes with equal passion. Krantz died on Saturday at the age of 91. NPR books editor Petra Mayer has this remembrance.

PETRA MAYER, BYLINE: Reading Judith Krantz is like playing dress-up in the world's most glamorous closet and then eating a plate of gold-leafed French pastries and then popping a bottle of posh champagne.

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The White House on Saturday published one-half of its long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace plan — a multibillion-dollar proposal to upgrade the Palestinian economy. The Palestinian leadership has already rejected it, and so far, it has been widely panned by former U.S. envoys and Mideast policy experts.

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Author Judith Krantz pioneered what you could call the sex and shopping novel. Her stories featured heroines with big hair and bigger wardrobes. They pursued power, pleasure and fabulous clothes with equal passion. Krantz died on Saturday at the age of 91. NPR books editor Petra Mayer has this remembrance.

PETRA MAYER, BYLINE: Reading Judith Krantz is like playing dress-up in the world's most glamorous closet and then eating a plate of gold-leafed French pastries and then popping a bottle of posh champagne.

Troll Watch: Robocalls

Jun 23, 2019

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Before Bill Cosby was an inmate at a Pennsylvania state prison, he held a pristine reputation as one of Hollywood's most beloved entertainers.

So when Andrea Constand's sexual assault allegations against Cosby broke in 2005, Nicole Weisensee Egan, an investigative reporter at the Philadelphia Daily News at the time, was skeptical. She had grown up watching The Cosby Show, revering the show's family-friendly main character, Cliff Huxtable.

"I was like, 'Who is this woman?' Because they weren't releasing her name," Egan says.

Marijuana Pepsi's mother told her that her birth name would take her places.

She wasn't wrong.

After a life spent being mocked for having an unusual name, the 46-year-old seized on her experience to earn a Ph.D. in higher education leadership. Her dissertation focused on unusual names, naturally.

As of last week, Marijuana Pepsi is now Dr. Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck.

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NICOLE WEISENSEE EGAN: Last Sunday, Bill Cosby's official social media account sent out a message wishing everyone a Happy Father's Day from America's dad. Not too long ago, this would not have raised many eyebrows. Bill Cosby was associated with the best of everything - not just a comedian, but a beloved one - not just a TV pioneer, but one of the most successful of his era - a major philanthropist, an educator, a mentor, a father figure - as he put it, America's dad.

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Late this afternoon, congressional leaders from both parties met with President Trump at the White House and were given a classified briefing about the downing of the U.S. drone. Congressman Adam Smith is a Democrat from Washington state who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, and he was at that meeting. Thank you for joining us.

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Late this afternoon, congressional leaders from both parties met with President Trump at the White House and were given a classified briefing about the downing of the U.S. drone. Congressman Adam Smith is a Democrat from Washington state who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, and he was at that meeting. Thank you for joining us.

ADAM SMITH: Thank you for having me, appreciate the chance.

SHAPIRO: I realize there was classified information at this briefing, but what can you tell us about what you learned this afternoon?

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Late this afternoon, congressional leaders from both parties met with President Trump at the White House and were given a classified briefing about the downing of the U.S. drone. Congressman Adam Smith is a Democrat from Washington state who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, and he was at that meeting. Thank you for joining us.

ADAM SMITH: Thank you for having me, appreciate the chance.

SHAPIRO: I realize there was classified information at this briefing, but what can you tell us about what you learned this afternoon?

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Carla Johnson has been evicted from nine apartments in the past four years. All she did, she says, was complain about things like a gas leak, mold or a missing security gate.

"It's cheaper for the landlord to put you out and move someone else in that doesn't know about the problem," she says.

She lives in Newburgh, N.Y., a former industrial town on the Hudson River about two hours north of Manhattan. She says most apartment owners in Newburgh do the bare minimum to maintain a unit, and if tenants complain, they get evicted.

The recent discovery of the remains of the last slave ship to the United States is bringing hope of revival to Africatown. It's a small community in Mobile, Ala., founded by African captives brought on the schooner Clotilda, thought to have arrived sometime in 1859 or 1860.

Lorna Woods' great-great-grandfather, Charlie Lewis, was brought to Mobile on the Clotilda. Now she tells his story as a volunteer with the local history museum.

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The U.S. women's soccer team is back in action tomorrow at the Women's World Cup in France. The team is taking on its biggest opponent yet, Sweden - a key match for the U.S. And there's plenty else going on at the tournament.

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California utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E) has agreed to pay $1 billion to 14 local governments throughout the state for the wildfire damage caused by its equipment and practices.

Attorneys for a group of local public entities — counties and cities — announced the proposed settlement Tuesday to help cover taxpayer losses from the 2015 Butte Fire, the 2017 North Bay Fires and the 2018 Camp Fire.

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