Hoback RV Park Owners Extend Leases, But Residents Say That's Not Good Enough

Dec 4, 2020

Credit Inanna Reistad

Late last month, residents of the Hoback RV Park were informed that their leases would not be renewed past the end of December and that much of the community would be evicted by New Year's Eve.

Crowley Capital, a minority owner of the RV park, is planning to bring the septic system there up to regulation. That will result in a smaller tank and reduced capacity at the site.

While the park owners have been planning this update for about a year, residents were told of the impending eviction deadline just over one month before the move-out date. The residents claim they had previously received verbal confirmation that their leases would be extended until May.

Residents objected to the eviction timeline and the short notice they were given, arguing that it was difficult, maybe even deadly, for elderly, disabled and at-risk people to move winterized mobile homes during the winter and during a pandemic.

In a press release, Crowley Capital says that the residents can now stay through the winter.

"This approach offers a solution that accommodates multiple stakeholders. First and foremost, it fully accommodates tenants' request to remain on site until May 31, 2021," the release states. "Of equal importance, this approach allows us to remain good stewards of the property in compliance with state, county and federal regulations. In a situation with multiple stakeholders and competing desired outcomes, this approach offers a fair, if imperfect, solution."

The release states residents can contract directly and individually with Macy's Services to provide septic and water service through the coming months. Between this and a reduced monthly rent, Crowley Capital claims in the release that monthly occupancy costs for residents should work out to less than what they've been paying.

But in a press release of their own, some residents say there's a lot that's still up in the air. At this time, the release states, residents don't have information on how their water access will be maintained and what costs that will incur on the community.

"Ultimately, we do not see Crowley Capital's offer to extend leases or its vague arrangement with Macy's a true solution," the release states. "We also find ourselves ill-equipped to fully understand the legal implications of this offer, and we have no means or opportunity to negotiate on our collective behalf."

The residents are now petitioning the Teton County Commissioners to ensure that they are treated fairly by the RV park owners as those owners work to bring the septic system into compliance set by county and state regulators.

"Crowley Capital operated a septic system that polluted this beautiful place we call home - but it was a system that was permitted by and now subject to enforcement action by the County and the State," the release states. "We are longtime residents and taxpayers who implore the Board of County Commissioners to intervene on our behalf and ensure that we have a viable solution."